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Michael Stoff, Director 305 East 23rd St, CLA 2.102, (G3600) Austin, TX 78712-1250 • 512-471-1442

David C. Warner

Professor Ph.D., Syracuse University

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Biography

David C. Warner's major teaching and research interests are in economics, health policy, and health finance. A graduate of Princeton University and Syracuse University (Ph.D. in economics), he formerly taught at Wayne State University and Yale University and was Deputy Director of the Office of Program Analysis of the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation.

Professor Warner has served as a consultant to a number of organizations in the health sector, and for six years was a member of the Board of Directors of Austin's Brackenridge Municipal Hospital. In addition, he was Chairman of the Texas Diabetes Council from January 1985 to December 1989. He has also served on several editorial and advisory boards and been appointed to other state level advisory committees.

At the LBJ School, Professor Warner has directed policy research projects on a variety of health and mental health topics. Among his publications are Toward New Human Rights, more than forty articles and book chapters, and sixteen books, monographs, and policy research project reports. He is currently working on projects related to improving health insurance coverage, the integration of the U.S. and Mexican health care systems, diabetes policy, public health funding, and U.S.-Mexico border health.

 

T C 357 • Investment Strategy

43425 • Fall 2014
Meets W 1200pm-300pm CRD 007A
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Warren Buffett and Bill Gates: How they got Rich and how they will give their money away

Course Number: TC 357                                                                                 Semester: Fall 2014

Instructor: David Warner, Wilbur J. Cohen Professor In Health and Social Policy, PHD, LBJ School of Public Affairs

 

Description:

This course will use the lives and writings of Warren Buffett and Bill Gates to examine the ways in which great wealth may be accumulated, the social role of business, and options in the field of philanthropy. The first four weeks will focus on “value investing” as opposed to current efficient market beliefs. Warren Buffett not only is generally thought to be the most successful investor of all time; but he is also seen by many as the most significant independent voice with regard to proper governance of the corporation.  Some of the issues we will examine will include:

  1. Whether corporation’s job is to maximize earnings or to serve many social goals
  2. Options for structuring philanthropy
  3. Ways of thinking about risk and uncertainty in investment and in life
  4. Executive compensation, Mr. Market, and the inheritance tax

We will also read biographies of Steve Jobs and Bill Gates to understand how they also were able to amass great wealth. We then will analyze the philanthropic initiatives of the Gates and other Buffett foundations and discuss their effectiveness and outcomes.

 

Texts/Readings:

Roger Lowenstein, Buffett: the Making of an American Capitalist

Buffett’s essays which are the first 20-30 pages of the Berkshire Hathaway annual report all on line at www.berkshirehathaway.com 

And a variety of other reading from Charles Munger’s  Poor Charlie’s Almanack,  Kilpatrick’s Of Permanent Value, and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

 

Assignments:

Two class exercises in which students prepare one side or another of a specific discussion for a particular class in which all will be involved – 30% (15% each)

Final Paper and class presentation – 40%

Class Participation - 30%

 

T C 357 • Investment Strategy

43485 • Fall 2013
Meets W 1230pm-330pm CRD 007B
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Full Title: Investment Strategy, The Social Role of Business and Effective Philanthropy: Lessons from Warren Buffett and Bill Gates

This course will use the lives and writings of Warren Buffett and Bill Gates to examine the ways in which great wealth may be accumulated, the social role of business, and options in the field of philanthropy. Warren Buffett not only is generally thought to be the most successful investor of all time; but he is also seen by many as the most significant independent voice with regard to proper governance of the corporation.  Some of the issues we will examine will include:

  1. Whether      corporation’s job is to maximize earnings or to serve many social goals
  2. Options      for structuring philanthropy
  3. Ways of      thinking about risk and uncertainty in investment and in life
  4. Executive      compensation, Mr. Market, and the inheritance tax

Texts/Readings:

Roger Lowenstein, Buffett: the Making of an American Capitalist

Buffett’s essays which are the first 20-30 pages of the Berkshire Hathaway annual report all on line at www.berkshirehathaway.com 

And a variety of other reading from Charles Munger’s  Poor Charlie’s Almanack,

Kilpatrick’s OF Permanaent Value and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

Assignments:

Two class exercises in which students prepare one side or another of a specific discussion for a particular class in which all will be involved – 30% (15% each)

Final Paper and class presentation – 40%

Class Participation - 30%

About the Professor:

David C. Warner's major teaching and research interests are in economics, health policy, and health finance. A graduate of Princeton University and Syracuse University (Ph.D. in economics), he formerly taught at Wayne State University and Yale University and was Deputy Director of the Office of Program Analysis of the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation.

Professor Warner has served as a consultant to a number of organizations in the health sector, and for six years was a member of the Board of Directors of Austin's Brackenridge Municipal Hospital. In addition, he was Chairman of the Texas Diabetes Council from January 1985 to December 1989. He has also served on several editorial and advisory boards and been appointed to other state level advisory committees.

At the LBJ School, Professor Warner has directed policy research projects on a variety of health and mental health topics. Among his publications are Toward New Human Rights, more than forty articles and book chapters, and sixteen books, monographs, and policy research project reports. He is currently working on projects related to improving health insurance coverage, the integration of the U.S. and Mexican health care systems, diabetes policy, public health funding, and U.S.-Mexico border health.

T C 357 • Investment Strategy

43005 • Fall 2012
Meets W 200pm-500pm CRD 007B
show description

Full Title: Investment Strategy, The Social Role of Business and Effective Philanthropy: Lessons from Warren Buffett and Bill Gates

This course will use the lives and writings of Warren Buffett and Bill Gates to examine the ways in which great wealth may be accumulated, the social role of business, and options in the field of philanthropy. Warren Buffett not only is generally thought to be the most successful investor of all time; but he is also seen by many as the most significant independent voice with regard to proper governance of the corporation.  Some of the issues we will examine will include:

  1. Whether corporation’s job is to maximize earnings or to serve many social goals
  2. Options for structuring philanthropy
  3. Ways of thinking about risk and uncertainty in investment and in life
  4. Executive compensation, Mr. Market, and the inheritance tax

Texts/Readings:

Roger Lowenstein, Buffett: the Making of an American Capitalist

Buffett’s essays which are the first 20-30 pages of the Berkshire Hathaway annual report all on line at www.berkshirehathaway.com 

And a variety of other reading from Charles Munger’s  Poor Charlie’s Almanack,

Kilpatrick’s OF Permanaent Value and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

Assignments:

Two class exercises in which students prepare one side or another of a specific discussion for a particular class in which all will be involved – 30% (15% each)

Final Paper and class presentation – 40%

Class Participation - 30%

About the Professor:

David C. Warner's major teaching and research interests are in economics, health policy, and health finance. A graduate of Princeton University and Syracuse University (Ph.D. in economics), he formerly taught at Wayne State University and Yale University and was Deputy Director of the Office of Program Analysis of the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation.

Professor Warner has served as a consultant to a number of organizations in the health sector, and for six years was a member of the Board of Directors of Austin's Brackenridge Municipal Hospital. In addition, he was Chairman of the Texas Diabetes Council from January 1985 to December 1989. He has also served on several editorial and advisory boards and been appointed to other state level advisory committees.

At the LBJ School, Professor Warner has directed policy research projects on a variety of health and mental health topics. Among his publications are Toward New Human Rights, more than forty articles and book chapters, and sixteen books, monographs, and policy research project reports. He is currently working on projects related to improving health insurance coverage, the integration of the U.S. and Mexican health care systems, diabetes policy, public health funding, and U.S.-Mexico border health.

T C 357 • Investment Strategy

42845 • Fall 2010
Meets T 200pm-500pm CRD 007B
show description

Description:

This course will use the lives and writings of Warren Buffett and Bill Gates to examine the ways in which great wealth may be accumulated, the social role of business, and options in the field of philanthropy. Warren Buffett not only is generally thought to be the most successful investor of all time; but he is also seen by many as the most significant independent voice with regard to proper governance of the corporation.  Some of the issues we will examine will include:

  1. Whether corporation’s job is to maximize earnings or to serve many social goals
  2. Options for structuring philanthropy
  3. Ways of thinking about risk and uncertainty in investment and in life
  4. Executive compensation, Mr. Market, and the inheritance tax

 

Texts/Readings:

Roger Lowenstein, Buffett: the Making of an American Capitalist

Buffett’s essays which are the first 20-30 pages of the Berkshire Hathaway annual report all on line at www.berkshirehathaway.com 

And a variety of other reading from Charles Munger’s  Poor Charlie’s Almanack,

Kilpatrick’s OF Permanaent Value and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

 

Assignments:

Two class exercises in which students prepare one side or another of a specific discussion for a particular class in which all will be involved – 30% (15% each)

Final Paper and class presentation – 40%

Class Participation - 30%

 

About the Professor:

David C. Warner's major teaching and research interests are in economics, health policy, and health finance. A graduate of Princeton University and Syracuse University (Ph.D. in economics), he formerly taught at Wayne State University and Yale University and was Deputy Director of the Office of Program Analysis of the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation.

Professor Warner has served as a consultant to a number of organizations in the health sector, and for six years was a member of the Board of Directors of Austin's Brackenridge Municipal Hospital. In addition, he was Chairman of the Texas Diabetes Council from January 1985 to December 1989. He has also served on several editorial and advisory boards and been appointed to other state level advisory committees.

At the LBJ School, Professor Warner has directed policy research projects on a variety of health and mental health topics. Among his publications are Toward New Human Rights, more than forty articles and book chapters, and sixteen books, monographs, and policy research project reports. He is currently working on projects related to improving health insurance coverage, the integration of the U.S. and Mexican health care systems, diabetes policy, public health funding, and U.S.-Mexico border health.

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