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Michael Stoff, Director 305 East 23rd St, CLA 2.102, (G3600) Austin, TX 78712-1250 • 512-471-1442

Wendy I Domjan

Senior Lecturer Ph.D., Univeristy of Wisconsin-Madison

Plan II Honors Assistant Director (Sr Lecturer)
Wendy I Domjan

Contact

  • Phone: 471-1442, 475-8495
  • Office: WCH 4.104 or SEA 5.212
  • Campus Mail Code: G 3600

S S 301 • Hon Soc Sci: Psychology

42290 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm NOA 1.126
(also listed as PSY 301 )
show description

Description:

Psychology is a discipline that is broadly concerned with the ways in which people perceive, understand and interact with the world. As such, it addresses questions that range from the micro level of perception within the eye to the macro level of social interactions among people. The SS 301 in psychology is designed to introduce students to a representative range of the topics subsumed within this discipline. We will be taking a levels-of-explanation approach, in which we will simultaneously explore the biological, environmental, and cultural aspects of each of the selected problems. We will also specifically consider the ways in which psychology investigates these problems, in terms of both methodology and epistemology. The hope is that students will leave the SS 301 with an understanding not only of what psychology studies, but also of how and why.

Readings:

Schacter, Gilbert & Weber. Psychology

Marcus. The Norton Psychology Reader

Keith. Cross Cultural Psychology

Requirements:

This class contains a substantial amount of writing and will involve both papers and exams. Students will write a series of four short (3-5 pages) reaction papers. For each paper, students will choose one of about five alternative questions, related to what is currently happening in class, to address. These papers are intended to involve analysis and opinion, not factual recitation. There will also be a midterm and a final exam. Both of these exams will have a short answer/short essay format, and will be take-home exams. Final grades will be computed on the following basis:

Exams:                 50% (25% each)

Papers:                 40% (10% each)

Participation:         10% 

Example paper topics:

An inevitable trade-off exists in research between control and ecological validity. This trade-off can be seen in a wide variety of ways in psychology: a lab versus a natural location for research, a randomly chosen versus a naturally occurring group of subjects, focusing on a limited set of factors at the expense of the diversity of influences on any behavior. In your view, how should psychology deal with this issue? For example, is psychology a science? Should it be? Should it adopt the same constraints (control) as natural sciences? You can make a strong argument for one approach or the other, or present a balanced middle ground.

The argument has been made that, in principle, it would be impossible for human beings to fully understand the nature of their own brain. What is your view of this argument, and why?

The current zeitgeist in psychology is to find the neurological mechanism associated with a given cognition, emotion or behavior. Does finding such a mechanism constitute an explanation for the given cognition/emotion/behavior? Why or why not?

A major issue in psychology, practically since its inception, has concerned the relative influence of genetics and environment. Originally, this was seen as an either-or question, later as a matter of degrees of influence, and most recently in terms of the components of an interaction. Though it is rarely asked, it is worth considering whether this is really an important question, and why? What is your position on this issue?

The research on hemisphere specialization led to the popular conception of people who are right-brained or left-brained. In light of what you have learned about hemisphere specialization, do you find this to be a useful concept? Why or why not? 

About the Professor:

Wendy Domjan has a Ph.D. in psychology from The University of Wisconsin, with specialties in perception and cognition, and currently has a major focus on psychology of religion and positive psychology.

S S 301 • Hon Soc Sci: Psychology

43650 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 301
show description

Description:

Psychology is a discipline that is broadly concerned with the ways in which people perceive, understand and interact with the world. As such, it addresses questions that range from the micro level of perception within the eye to the macro level of social interactions among people. The SS 301 in psychology is designed to introduce students to a representative range of the topics subsumed within this discipline. We will be taking a levels-of-explanation approach, in which we will simultaneously explore the biological, environmental, and cultural aspects of each of the selected problems. We will also specifically consider the ways in which psychology investigates these problems, in terms of both methodology and epistemology. The hope is that students will leave the SS 301 with an understanding not only of what psychology studies, but also of how and why.

Readings:

Schacter, Gilbert & Weber.Psychology

Marcus. The Norton Psychology Reader

Keith. Cross Cultural Psychology

Requirements:

This class contains a substantial amount of writing and will involve both papers and exams. Students will write a series of four short (3-5 pages) reaction papers. For each paper, students will choose one of about five alternative questions, related to what is currently happening in class, to address. These papers are intended to involve analysis and opinion, not factual recitation. There will also be a midterm and a final exam. Both of these exams will have a short answer/short essay format, and will be take-home exams.

 

Final grades will be computed on the following basis:

Exams:                 50% (25% each)

Papers:                 40% (10% each)

Participation:         10%

 

Example paper topics:

  • An inevitable trade-off exists in research between control and ecological validity. This trade-off can be seen in a wide variety of ways in psychology: a lab versus a natural location for research, a randomly chosen versus a naturally occurring group of subjects, focusing on a limited set of factors at the expense of the diversity of influences on any behavior. In your view, how should psychology deal with this issue? For example, is psychology a science? Should it be? Should it adopt the same constraints (control) as natural sciences? You can make a strong argument for one approach or the other, or present a balanced middle ground.
  • The argument has been made that, in principle, it would be impossible for human beings to fully understand the nature of their own brain. What is your view of this argument, and why?
  • The current zeitgeist in psychology is to find the neurological mechanism associated with a given cognition, emotion or behavior. Does finding such a mechanism constitute an explanation for the given cognition/emotion/behavior? Why or why not?
  • A major issue in psychology, practically since its inception, has concerned the relative influence of genetics and environment. Originally, this was seen as an either-or question, later as a matter of degrees of influence, and most recently in terms of the components of an interaction. Though it is rarely asked, it is worth considering whether this is really an important question, and why? What is your position on this issue?
  • The research on hemisphere specialization led to the popular conception of people who are right-brained or left-brained. In light of what you have learned about hemisphere specialization, do you find this to be a useful concept? Why or why not?

 

About the Professor:

Wendy Domjan has a Ph.D. in psychology from The University of Wisconsin, with specialties in perception and cognition, and currently has a major focus on psychology of religion and positive psychology.

S S 301 • Hon Soc Sci: Psychology

43000 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm NOA 1.102
show description

Description:

Psychology is a discipline that is broadly concerned with the ways in which people perceive, understand and interact with the world. As such, it addresses questions that range from the micro level of perception within the eye to the macro level of social interactions among people. The SS 301 in psychology is designed to introduce students to a representative range of the topics subsumed within this discipline. We will be taking a levels-of-explanation approach, in which we will simultaneously explore the biological, environmental, and cultural aspects of each of the selected problems. We will also specifically consider the ways in which psychology investigates these problems, in terms of both methodology and epistemology. The hope is that students will leave the SS 301 with an understanding not only of what psychology studies, but also of how and why.

Readings:

Schacter, Gilbert & Weber.Psychology

Marcus. The Norton Psychology Reader

Keith. Cross Cultural Psychology

Requirements:

This class contains a substantial amount of writing and will involve both papers and exams. Students will write a series of four short (3-5 pages) reaction papers. For each paper, students will choose one of about five alternative questions, related to what is currently happening in class, to address. These papers are intended to involve analysis and opinion, not factual recitation. There will also be a midterm and a final exam. Both of these exams will have a short answer/short essay format, and will be take-home exams.

 

Final grades will be computed on the following basis:

Exams:                 50% (25% each)

Papers:                 40% (10% each)

Participation:         10%

 

Example paper topics:

  • An inevitable trade-off exists in research between control and ecological validity. This trade-off can be seen in a wide variety of ways in psychology: a lab versus a natural location for research, a randomly chosen versus a naturally occurring group of subjects, focusing on a limited set of factors at the expense of the diversity of influences on any behavior. In your view, how should psychology deal with this issue? For example, is psychology a science? Should it be? Should it adopt the same constraints (control) as natural sciences? You can make a strong argument for one approach or the other, or present a balanced middle ground.
  • The argument has been made that, in principle, it would be impossible for human beings to fully understand the nature of their own brain. What is your view of this argument, and why?
  • The current zeitgeist in psychology is to find the neurological mechanism associated with a given cognition, emotion or behavior. Does finding such a mechanism constitute an explanation for the given cognition/emotion/behavior? Why or why not?
  • A major issue in psychology, practically since its inception, has concerned the relative influence of genetics and environment. Originally, this was seen as an either-or question, later as a matter of degrees of influence, and most recently in terms of the components of an interaction. Though it is rarely asked, it is worth considering whether this is really an important question, and why? What is your position on this issue?
  • The research on hemisphere specialization led to the popular conception of people who are right-brained or left-brained. In light of what you have learned about hemisphere specialization, do you find this to be a useful concept? Why or why not?

 

About the Professor:

Wendy Domjan has a Ph.D. in psychology from The University of Wisconsin, with specialties in perception and cognition, and currently has a major focus on psychology of religion and positive psychology.

S S 301 • Hon Soc Sci: Psychology

42850 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 800am-930am NOA 1.102
show description

Description:

Psychology is a discipline that is broadly concerned with the ways in which people perceive, understand and interact with the world. As such, it addresses questions that range from the micro level of perception within the eye to the macro level of social interactions among people. The SS 301 in psychology is designed to introduce students to a representative range of the topics subsumed within this discipline. We will be taking a levels-of-explanation approach, in which we will simultaneously explore the biological, environmental, and cultural aspects of each of the selected problems. We will also specifically consider the ways in which psychology investigates these problems, in terms of both methodology and epistemology. The hope is that students will leave the SS 301 with an understanding not only of what psychology studies, but also of how and why.

 

Readings:

M. Gazzaniga, & T. Heatherton, The Psychological Science: the Mind, the Brain and Behavior

R. Hock, Forty Studies that Changed Psychology

W. Price & H. Richley, Cross-Cultural Perspectives in Introductory Psychology

 

Requirements:

This class contains a substantial amount of writing and will involve both papers and exams. Students will write a series of four short (3-5 pages) reaction papers. For each paper, students will choose one of about five alternative questions, related to what is currently happening in class, to address. These papers are intended to involve analysis and opinion, not factual recitation. There will also be a midterm and a final exam. Both of these exams will have a short answer/short essay format, and will be take-home exams.

 

Final grades will be computed on the following basis:

Exams:                 50% (25% each)

Papers:                40% (10% each)

Participation:         10%

 

Example paper topics:

  • An inevitable trade-off exists in research between control and ecological validity. This trade-off can be seen in a wide variety of ways in psychology: a lab versus a natural location for research, a randomly chosen versus a naturally occurring group of subjects, focusing on a limited set of factors at the expense of the diversity of influences on any behavior. In your view, how should psychology deal with this issue? For example, is psychology a science? Should it be? Should it adopt the same constraints (control) as natural sciences? You can make a strong argument for one approach or the other, or present a balanced middle ground.

 

  • The argument has been made that, in principle, it would be impossible for human beings to fully understand the nature of their own brain. What is your view of this argument, and why?

 

  • The current zeitgeist in psychology is to find the neurological mechanism associated with a given cognition, emotion or behavior. Does finding such a mechanism constitute an explanation for the given cognition/emotion/behavior? Why or why not?

 

  • A major issue in psychology, practically since its inception, has concerned the relative influence of genetics and environment. Originally, this was seen as an either-or question, later as a matter of degrees of influence, and most recently in terms of the components of an interaction. Though it is rarely asked, it is worth considering whether this is really an important question, and why? What is your position on this issue?

 

  • The research on hemisphere specialization led to the popular conception of people who are right-brained or left-brained. In light of what you have learned about hemisphere specialization, do you find this to be a useful concept? Why or why not?

 

About the Professor

Wendy Domjan has a Ph.D. in psychology from The University of Wisconsin, with specialties in perception and cognition, and currently has a major focus on psychology of religion and psychology of religious fundamentalism.

S S 301 • Hon Soc Sci: Psychology

43340 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 400pm-500pm BUR 130
show description

Description:

Psychology is a discipline that is broadly concerned with the ways in which people perceive, understand and interact with the world. As such, it addresses questions that range from the micro level of perception within the eye to the macro level of social interactions among people. The SS 301 in psychology is designed to introduce students to a representative range of the topics subsumed within this discipline. We will be taking a levels-of-explanation approach, in which we will simultaneously explore the biological, environmental, and cultural aspects of each of the selected problems. We will also specifically consider the ways in which psychology investigates these problems, in terms of both methodology and epistemology. The hope is that students will leave the SS 301 with an understanding not only of what psychology studies, but also of how and why.

 

Readings:

M. Gazzaniga, & T. Heatherton, The Psychological Science: the Mind, the Brain and Behavior

R. Hock, Forty Studies that Changed Psychology

W. Price & H. Richley, Cross-Cultural Perspectives in Introductory Psychology

 

Requirements:

This class contains a substantial writing component and will involve both papers and exams. Students will write a series of four short (3-5 pages) reaction papers. For each paper, students will choose one of about five alternative questions, related to what is currently happening in class, to address. These papers are intended to involve analysis and opinion, not factual recitation. There will also be a midterm and a final exam. Both of these exams will have a short answer/short essay format, and will be take-home exams.

 

Final grades will be computed on the following basis:

Exams:                  50% (25% each)

Papers:                  40% (10% each)

Participation:         10%

 

Example paper topics:

  • An inevitable trade-off exists in research between control and ecological validity. This trade-off can be seen in a wide variety of ways in psychology: a lab versus a natural location for research, a randomly chosen versus a naturally occurring group of subjects, focusing on a limited set of factors at the expense of the diversity of influences on any behavior. In your view, how should psychology deal with this issue? For example, is psychology a science? Should it be? Should it adopt the same constraints (control) as natural sciences? You can make a strong argument for one approach or the other, or present a balanced middle ground.

 

  • The argument has been made that, in principle, it would be impossible for human beings to fully understand the nature of their own brain. What is your view of this argument, and why?

 

  • The current zeitgeist in psychology is to find the neurological mechanism associated with a given cognition, emotion or behavior. Does finding such a mechanism constitute an explanation for the given cognition/emotion/behavior? Why or why not?

 

  • A major issue in psychology, practically since its inception, has concerned the relative influence of genetics and environment. Originally, this was seen as an either-or question, later as a matter of degrees of influence, and most recently in terms of the components of an interaction. Though it is rarely asked, it is worth considering whether this is really an important question, and why? What is your position on this issue?

 

  • The research on hemisphere specialization led to the popular conception of people who are right-brained or left-brained. In light of what you have learned about hemisphere specialization, do you find this to be a useful concept? Why or why not?

 

About the Professor

Wendy Domjan has a Ph.D. in psychology from The University of Wisconsin, with specialties in perception and cognition, and currently has a major focus on psychology of religion and psychology of religious fundamentalism.

S S 301 • Hon Soc Sci: Psychology

42700 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm JGB 2.218
show description

Description:

Psychology is a discipline that is broadly concerned with the ways in which people perceive, understand and interact with the world. As such, it addresses questions that range from the micro level of perception within the eye to the macro level of social interactions among people. The SS 301 in psychology is designed to introduce students to a representative range of the topics subsumed within this discipline. We will be taking a levels-of-explanation approach, in which we will simultaneously explore the biological, environmental, and cultural aspects of each of the selected problems. We will also specifically consider the ways in which psychology investigates these problems, in terms of both methodology and epistemology. The hope is that students will leave the SS 301 with an understanding not only of what psychology studies, but also of how and why.

Readings:

M. Gazzaniga, & T. Heatherton, The Psychological Science: the Mind, the Brain and Behavior

R. Hock, Forty Studies that Changed Psychology

W. Price & H. Richley, Cross-Cultural Perspectives in Introductory Psychology

Requirements:

This class contains a substantial writing component and will involve both papers and exams. Students will write a series of four short (3-5 pages) reaction papers. For each paper, students will choose one of about five alternative questions, related to what is currently happening in class, to address. These papers are intended to involve analysis and opinion, not factual recitation. There will also be a midterm and a final exam. Both of these exams will have a short answer/short essay format, and will be take-home exams.

Final grades will be computed on the following basis:

Exams:                  50% (25% each)

Papers:                  40% (10% each)

Participation:         10%

Example paper topics:

  • An inevitable trade-off exists in research between control and ecological validity. This trade-off can be seen in a wide variety of ways in psychology: a lab versus a natural location for research, a randomly chosen versus a naturally occurring group of subjects, focusing on a limited set of factors at the expense of the diversity of influences on any behavior. In your view, how should psychology deal with this issue? For example, is psychology a science? Should it be? Should it adopt the same constraints (control) as natural sciences? You can make a strong argument for one approach or the other, or present a balanced middle ground.
  • The argument has been made that, in principle, it would be impossible for human beings to fully understand the nature of their own brain. What is your view of this argument, and why?
  • The current zeitgeist in psychology is to find the neurological mechanism associated with a given cognition, emotion or behavior. Does finding such a mechanism constitute an explanation for the given cognition/emotion/behavior? Why or why not?
  • A major issue in psychology, practically since its inception, has concerned the relative influence of genetics and environment. Originally, this was seen as an either-or question, later as a matter of degrees of influence, and most recently in terms of the components of an interaction. Though it is rarely asked, it is worth considering whether this is really an important question, and why? What is your position on this issue?
  • The research on hemisphere specialization led to the popular conception of people who are right-brained or left-brained. In light of what you have learned about hemisphere specialization, do you find this to be a useful concept? Why or why not?

About the Professor

Wendy Domjan has a Ph.D. in psychology from The University of Wisconsin, with specialties in perception and cognition, and currently has a major focus on psychology of religion and psychology of religious fundamentalism.

S S 301 • Hon Soc Sci: Psychology-W

43470 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 930-1100 WEL 2.256
show description

Plan II Honors Social Science Psychology (43470)
   Spring 2010:  TTh 9:30, WEL 2.256

Instructor:  
Dr. Wendy Domjan: SEA  5.212 (475-8495) and WCH 4.104 (471-1442)
Office hours: In SEA 5. S212 on TTh 2-3:30 and F 1-2
                       In WCH 4.104 on M 11-1:20 and W 9-11
E-mail: wdomjan@mail.utexas.edu  or wdomjan@gmail.com.
Texts:
Schacter, Gilbert & Wegner: Psychology
Baird, A. Current Directions in Introductory Psychology
Price, William & Richley Crappo: Cross-Cultural Perspectives in Introductory Psychology.
Requirements:
This class will involve both papers and exams. Students will write a series of three short (3-5 pages) reaction papers. For each paper, students will choose one of about five alternative questions, related to what is currently happening in class, to address. These papers are intended to involve analysis and opinion, not factual recitation. There will also be a midterm and a final exam. Both of these exams will have a short answer/short essay format, and will be take-home exams. All paper topics and take-home exams will be distributed two weeks prior to the due date. They are due by midnight on the due date; please submit them by e-mail, as word files.
Grading:
Final grades will be computed on the following basis:
Exams:      50% (25% each)
Papers:      36% (12% each)
Participation:      14%
Experiment Requirement: The Psychology Department has a requirement that students in Psychology 301 either participate in a certain number of psychology experiments or write a paper.  No course credit is given for either the experiments or the paper.  However, you must complete this requirement in order to receive a grade in this class. In order to be eligible for many of the experiments, you must complete on-line pre-testing. The details about this requirement are contained in your green handout. If you have lost this handout, or added the class late and did not receive it, you can get another one from the Undergraduate Psychology Office (Seay 2.216). You can also find out about this requirement by going to the location in the Psychology Department WebSite that describes this requirement. This link will also allow you to go to the location for signing up for studies on-line, for doing pre-testing, or for learning about the paper that can be done instead of doing experiments: http://www.psy.utexas.edu/psy/undergrad/courses/info/pretesting.html
Special Testing Arrangements: The University of Texas at Austin provides, upon request, appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TTY.
If a student has a documented need for special testing arrangements, it is the responsibility of the student to arrange with the instructor for special testing prior to each exam

 
Course Schedule

*SGW: Schacter, Gilbert & Wegner        B: Baird        P&C: Price & Crappo    
All papers and exams are due by 11:59 pm on the date given below

Date                Topic                    Reading
January 19            Introduction            SGW: Chapters 1 & 2
                                P&C: Part 1
January 21-28            Biopsychology        SGW: Chapters 3 & 14
                                P&C: Part 13
                                B:  Pp. 47-55, 100-116
February 2-9            Social                SGW: Chapter 15                                            P&C: Part 15
                                B: Section 6
Paper 1 Due: February 9th

February 11-16         Cognition            SGW: Chapter 5
                         P&C: Part 6 & 7
                                                           B: Pp. 56-63, 93-100, 81-88
Feb 18-March 2        Development            SGW: chapter 10                                            P&C: Part 10, Part 16
                                B: Section 1
Paper 2 Due:  March 2nd

March 4-23            Personality            SGW: Chapter 11                                            P&C: Part 12, Part 1.2, 1.3
                                B: Pp. 161-193, Pp. 73-80
Midterm Exam:  Due March 23rd

March 25-30            Learning            SGW: Chapter 6
                                P&C: Part 5    
April 1-13            Disorders            SGW: Chapter 12                                            P&C: Part 14
                                                   B: Section 4, Pp. 194-200      
April 15-22            Treatment            SGW: Chapter 13
Paper 3 Due: April 20h

April 27-29            Consciousness            SGW: Chapter 8                                            P&C: Part 4                
May 4-6             Emotion            SGW: Chapter 9
                                P&C: Parts 8 & 9
                                B: Pp. 64-72, 117-124
Final Exam Due: May 6th

T C 357 • Hmn Nature: Psy/Rel Perspect-W

43780 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 800-930 BUR 228
show description

Psychology 341K: Psychology and Religion (44150)
Fall 2009, MWF 9-10, ECJ 1.204

Instructor:  Dr. Wendy Domjan; WCH 4.104, email: wdomjan@gmail.com.
Office hours: MWF 10-11, TTh 9:30-10:30, or by appointment
Texts:   
Psychology, Religion and Spirituality by Fontana
The God Gene by Hammer
After the Baby Boom by Wurthnow
Terror in the Name of God by Stern
Other Resources:
UT students can use the library at the Presbyterian Seminary, 100 East 27th Street (this is on the other side of 27th from the student services building); they have many journals that are useful in this class that the UT library system doesn’t carry.
GREAT WebSite: http://www.psywww.com/psyrelig/index.htm
Course Prerequisites:
The Psychology Department will drop all students who do not meet the following prerequisites:
(a) PSY 301 with a C or better
(b) PSY 418 (or an equivalent listed in the course schedule) with a C or better
(c) Upper-Division standing (60 hours completed)
Please note: The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TTY.
Course Orientation: This course is designed to examine the interaction between psychology and religion from a dual perspective.  One focus will explore how psychology can illuminate our understanding of religion.  A second focus will consider the ways in which religion influences psychological functioning, by impacting upon beliefs, behaviors and both mental and physical health.   Psychology approaches the study of religion from an empirical, not a philosophical or theological, perspective.  Please note that the course will investigate global aspects of religion, such as the development and influence of faith; it is not intended to analyze, contrast, or evaluate specific religious beliefs. The bulk of theory and research in this area concerns the three major monotheistic religions, thus these religions will provide the class context.
Course Requirements:  A major portion of this class involves discussion; students are expected to actively participate in class discussions.
There are two options for the written requirements for this class. The basic option is to write a series of four short (about 4-5 pages) essays on topics relating to the material being covered in class. I will post a set of potential questions two weeks before each essay is due; each student will respond to one of these questions. It is always possible, and even preferable, for a student to write on an alternative question of particular interest. These are thought pieces, not research papers.  If you have a special interest in some topic, a second option is to do a long (about 15-20 pages) research paper.
E-mail Submission of Papers:
Topics for the short papers will be distributed two weeks before the papers are due. Papers must be turned in by e-mail as WORD files, by midnight on the due dates. For the long papers, the drafts will be due on April 16th; the final papers will be due on May 9th.
Grades: 
Short Essays: 72% (18% each) or Research paper: 72% (draft 22%, final version 50%)
Discussion Essays 15% (5% each)
Participation (which requires attendance): 13%
               
 
Course Outline
No class on September 7th for Labor Day and November 27th for Thanksgiving

Mondays and Wednesdays will be lecture. Fridays will be discussion.
Date                Topic                Reading   
August 26-September 18    Basic Issues            Fontana 1, 2 , 4   
September 21-25        Biological Influences        Fontana 7    
September 28-October 12    Development            Fontana 6
October 14-30             Adult Life            Fontana 5       
November 2-6            Religious Experience                Fontana 3, 8.10, 11
November 9-18        Conversion                       
November 20-25        Coping                Fontana 12               
November 30- December 4    Mental Health            Fontana 11
                                                               

On the last Friday of each month, we will be discussing one of three books, each of which presents an interesting and somewhat provocative view of some aspect of religion. Students will be required to turn in 1 page essays on the preceding Wednesdays, responding to one of several proposed discussion questions.
Discussion Date             Book                Essay Due
September 25             The God Gene              September 23
October 23            After the Baby Boom            October 21
November 20            Terror in the Name of God        November 18


Assignment            Due Date
Short Paper 1            September 21
Short Paper 2            October 19
Short Paper 3            November 9
Short Paper 4            December 7
Or
Draft Research Paper        November 20
Final Research Paper        December 7

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