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James Loehlin, Director 208 West 21st Street, Stop B5000, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4726

Actors from the London Stage present Othello

Sat, November 9, 2013 • 7:00 PM - 10:00 PM • Winedale Theater Barn - Near Round Top, Texas

2013 AFTLS company performs Othello

2013 AFTLS company performs Othello

Actors from the London Stage returns to The University of Texas at Austin this fall with a production of Othello.  Employing just five actors to assume all the roles in a Shakespearean drama, Actors from the London Stage performances are minimalist in terms of props and staging, intimate and compelling. The performances emphasize language, characterization, and dramatic energy; the results are startlingly clear and powerful, even magical, for audiences of all ages in a way that large-scale productions in the big theaters of Stratford and London can never be. The actors also lead workshops in classes around campus.

This year's residency will take place this year from Friday, November 1st – Saturday, November 9th at the University of Texas at Austin. Performances of Othello will be held at the McCullough Theater on UT Austin campus on November 6th, 7th, and 8th at 7:30pm. It will then be performed at the Winedale Historical Center on November 9th at 7pm. Tickets are $20 and $10 for UT Faculty/UT Staff/Students. For McCullough Theater performances, tickets can be purchased by calling 512.477.6060 or visiting here. For Winedale performances, tickets are available here or by calling (512) 471-4726.

The Tragedy of Othello, the Moor of Venice is William Shakespeare’s timeless story about love, jealousy, racism, and betrayal. Othello, newly married to Desdemona who is half his age, is appointed leader of a military operation. Iago, his ensign, passed over for promotion in favor of young Cassio, persuades Othello that Cassio and Desdemona are having an affair. Called everything from “the noble Moor” to “egregiously an ass,” Othello has little defense but poetry against Iago’s brilliant and vile machinations; and in the end, as he foresees, “chaos is come again.”

Learn more about the AFTLS program here.

 


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