Department of Psychology
Department of Psychology

Jarrod A Lewis-Peacock


Assistant ProfessorPh.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison

Jarrod A Lewis-Peacock

Contact

Interests


Interactions between memory, attention, and learning; neural decoding & neurofeedback

Biography


Jarrod Lewis-Peacock received his B.S. in Computer Engineering, M.S. in Computer Science, and finally his Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and was a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Psychology and the Princeton Neuroscience Institute at Princeton University before coming to the University of Texas at Austin in 2013. His research in the field of Cognitive Neuroscience focuses on understanding how the processes of working memory and long-term memory interact with one another in the human brain, and on how people dynamically deploy these resources in the service of pursuing their goals. His lab uses a combination of behavioral methods, functional neuroimaging, and computational approaches to address these questions. For example, his research melds brain imaging with machine learning techniques to “peek under the hood” and test psychological theories in powerful new ways. By analyzing distributed spatial and temporal patterns of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data, it is possible read out moment-to-moment information trajectories in the brain and identify what a person is seeing, retrieving from memory, holding in mind, and even forgetting. His lab is currently working to expand this approach to incorporate real-time neurofeedback – that is, providing information about a person's brain activity while they are performing a task in the MRI scanner. This state of the art methodology will enable experiments to test whether people can be trained to improve their memory abilities, and in some instances, to strategically impair them (for example, to intentionally forget things), through timely feedback based on real-time measurements of brain function. 

Representative Publications

Lewis-Peacock, J.A. & Norman, K.A. (2014). Competition between items in working memory leads to forgetting. Nature Communications, 5, article number 5768, doi: 10.1038/NCOMMS6768.

Kim, G., Lewis-Peacock, J.A., Norman, K.A., & Turk-Browne, N. (2014). Pruning of memories by context-based prediction error. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, doi: 10.1073/PNAS.1319438111.

Lewis-Peacock, J.A., Drysdale, A.T., & Postle, B.R. (2014). Neural evidence for the flexible control of mental representations. Cerebral Cortex. doi: 10.1093/CERCOR/BHU130. 

LaRocque, J.J., Lewis-Peacock, J.A., & Postle, B.R. (2014). Multiple neural states of representation in short-term memory? It’s a matter of attention. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 8, 5.

Lewis-Peacock, J.A. & Postle, B.R. (2012). Decoding the internal focus of attention. Neuropsychologia, 50(4): 470-478.

Lewis-Peacock, J.A., Drysdale, A.T., Oberauer, K., & Postle, B.R. (2012). Neural evidence for a distinction between short-term memory and the focus of attention. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 24(1): 61-79.

Lewis-Peacock, J.A. & Postle, B.R. (2008). Temporary activation of long-term memory supports working memory. Journal of Neuroscience, 28(35), 8765-8771.

Courses


PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

42205-42210 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 800am-930am NOA 1.116

Students may not enroll in Psychology 418 more than twice. Survey of statistics, including central tendency, variability and inference, and scientific methodology used in psychological research. Three lecture hours and two discussion hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C and credit for one of the following: Mathematics 302, 303D, 403K, 305G, 408C, 408K, 316; or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 394U • Fmri Brain Decoding

42920 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm SEA 1.332

Seminars in Cognitive or Perceptual Systems. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 394U • Fmri Brain Decoding

44315 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm SEA 1.332

Seminars in Cognitive or Perceptual Systems. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

43665-43670 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm NOA 1.116

Students may not enroll in Psychology 418 more than twice. Survey of statistics, including central tendency, variability and inference, and scientific methodology used in psychological research. Three lecture hours and two discussion hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C and credit for one of the following: Mathematics 302, 303D, 403K, 305G, 408C, 408K, 316; or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

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  • Department of Psychology

    The University of Texas at Austin
    SEA 4.208
    108 E. Dean Keeton Stop A8000
    Austin, TX 78712-1043
    512-471-1157