Department of Psychology
Department of Psychology

Samuel D Gosling


ProfessorPh.D., University of California, Berkeley

Samuel D Gosling

Contact

Interests


Interpersonal perception, personality and temperament in non-human animals, and internet research methods

Biography


To learn about my current research, please see: http://gosling.psy.utexas.edu/current-research/

Courses


PSY 301 • Introduction To Psychology

42975 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 100pm-230pm SEA 2.114

Basic problems and principles of human experience and behavior. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, or the equivalent in independent study.

 

FOR PENNEBAKER/GOSLING'S ONLINE COURSE SEE http://www.laits.utexas.edu/tower/psy301 FOR MORE INFORMATON!!

PSY 301 • Introduction To Psychology

42980 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm

Basic problems and principles of human experience and behavior. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, or the equivalent in independent study.

 

FOR PENNEBAKER/GOSLING'S ONLINE COURSE SEE http://www.laits.utexas.edu/tower/psy301 FOR MORE INFORMATON!!

PSY 301 • Introduction To Psychology

42210 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm

Basic problems and principles of human experience and behavior. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, or the equivalent in independent study.

 

FOR PENNEBAKER/GOSLING'S ONLINE COURSE SEE http://www.laits.utexas.edu/tower/psy301 FOR MORE INFORMATON!!

PSY 301 • Introduction To Psychology

42175 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm

Basic problems and principles of human experience and behavior. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, or the equivalent in independent study.

 

FOR PENNEBAKER/GOSLING'S ONLINE COURSE SEE http://www.laits.utexas.edu/tower/psy301 FOR MORE INFORMATON!!

PSY 301 • Introduction To Psychology

42509 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm

Basic problems and principles of human experience and behavior. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, or the equivalent in independent study.

 

FOR PENNEBAKER/GOSLING'S ONLINE COURSE SEE http://www.laits.utexas.edu/tower/psy301 FOR MORE INFORMATON!!

PSY 394V • Curr Tpcs In Social-Pers Psy

42955 • Spring 2015
Meets W 400pm-700pm SEA 1.332

Seminars in Social and Personality Psychology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 301 • Introduction To Psychology

43550-43558 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm

Basic problems and principles of human experience and behavior. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, or the equivalent in independent study.

 

FOR PENNEBAKER/GOSLING'S ONLINE COURSE SEE http://www.laits.utexas.edu/tower/psy301 FOR MORE INFORMATON!!

PSY 394V • Curr Tpcs In Social-Pers Psy

44375 • Spring 2014
Meets W 400pm-700pm SEA 3.250

Seminars in Social and Personality Psychology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 301 • Introduction To Psychology

43600 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 400pm-530pm GAR 0.128

Basic problems and principles of human experience and behavior. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, or the equivalent in independent study.

 

FOR PENNEBAKER/GOSLING'S ONLINE COURSE SEE http://www.laits.utexas.edu/tower/psy301 FOR MORE INFORMATON!!

PSY 301 • Introduction To Psychology

43152 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 400pm-530pm

This Introductory Psychology section will be online and live at the assigned time.  A rotating group of 40-80 students will be invited to attend selected class presentations. Introductoy Psychology is designed to give the students a broad overview of the theory, methods, and findings of modern-day psychology. This is a computer-intensive course whereby students will be required to check into every class via their personal computer. In addition to daily benchmark quizzes, students will be expected to discuss class topics, take surveys, and participate in exercises on their computers. Although there is no textbook, online reading assignements will be assigned for each class. Grades will be based on the daily bechmarks and four writing assignments.  For more course information please visit:

 https://media.psy.utexas.edu/groups/psy301web/wiki/e572c/PSY_301_Online_Course_Gosling__Pennenaker.html#

PSY 341K • Personality Assessment

43300 • Spring 2012
Meets T 330pm-630pm SEA 2.108

This class will teach students about the principles and practice of assessing personality. The early lectures will start with basic methods (e.g., self-reports) and will use them to demonstrate fundamental measurement principles. The class will then focus on several specific methods for assessing personality. Throughout the course, demonstrations and exercises will be used to illustrate the lecture material.

This course carries the Writing Flag. Writing Flag courses are designed to give you experience with writing in an academic discipline. In this class, you can expect to write regularly during the semester, complete substantial writing projects, and receive feedback to help you improve your writing. You will also have the opportunity to revise one or more assignments, and to read and discuss your peers' work. So you should expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from your written work.

PSY 301 • Introduction To Psychology

43040 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm BUR 106

Daily benchmarks and grading. Although psychology is fun and exciting, don't expect it to be an easy course. Having taught this class dozens of times, we expect you to immerse yourself into the readings and lectures. This is an idea class as opposed to a simple fact class. We are more concerned with the ideas and implications of what Freud or Skinner thought than with their birthdays or favorite colors. All of the assessments will stress psychological concepts and their relationships to other concepts and to practical examples.

Rather than thinking of grading as a result of exams, tests, or quizzes, we think of this class as an opportunity to learn to ideas and perspectives. Instead of exams, we call them assessments or benchmarks. The benchmarks reflect student progress over the course of the semester. Although the lectures and readings are the same for both classes, the Pennebaker and Gosling sections will have separate benchmark assessments. If you are signed up for the 2:00 class, you can only take the 2:00 exam; ditto for the 3:30 class. The two sections will have somewhat different benchmark questions and may emphasize slightly different issues. Because any given lecture may be somewhat different in one class versus the other, be sure and attend the class you signed up for.

There will typically be an online benchmark at the beginning of every class. The benchmark assessments will generally include 8 questions – roughly half from lecture and half from the reading. Of the 8 questions, 5 or 6 will come from the previous lecture and most recent readings. The remaining 2-3 questions will be cumulative from previous parts of the course. In addition, at least one question will be specially selected from questions you have missed on your previous exams. Counting the first day of class, there are 28 lectures. The second lecture will be the first benchmark but it won’t count in order to give everyone the opportunity to learn how the system works. The remaining 26 classes will all have benchmarks that will count towards your final grade.

The final grade is based on your benchmark scores and the completion of the writing requirement. Each benchmark is worth 3.6% of your final grade. Your three lowest assessments are worth only 1%. The benchmark assessments are given at the same time at the beginning of class. If you are sick or have an emergency of some kind, you can take the benchmark remotely as long as you take it at the appointed time. If that doesn’t work, you can simply count up to three assessments that you miss as one of the lowest grades worth only 1% each. Because of this policy, there will be no makeup exams except under extremely unusual circumstances. Note that you are restricted to taking only five benchmark assessments remotely. If more than five are done remotely, you will be required to take supplementary exams during the final exam period on the supplemental assessments.

PSY 341K • Personality Assessment

43790 • Spring 2011
Meets TH 330pm-630pm SEA 2.108

This class will teach students about the principles and practice of assessing personality. The early

lectures will start with basic methods (e.g., self-reports) and will use them to demonstrate

fundamental measurement principles. The class will then focus on several specific methods for

assessing personality. Throughout the course, demonstrations and exercises will be used to

illustrate the lecture material.

This course carries the Writing Flag. Writing Flag courses are designed to give you experience

with writing in an academic discipline. In this class, you can expect to write regularly during the

semester, complete substantial writing projects, and receive feedback to help you improve your

writing. You will also have the opportunity to revise one or more assignments, and to read and

discuss your peers' work. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to

come from your written work.

PSY 394V • Adv Tpcs In Personality Psych

44045 • Spring 2011
Meets T 600pm-900pm SEA 3.250

Seminars in Social and Personality Psychology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 301 • Introduction To Psychology

43000 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm BUR 106

Prerequisites

A passing score on the reading section of the TASP test.

Course Description

The purpose of this class is to explore the many ways in which psychology illuminates our understanding of thinking and behavior and to examine critically theories and explanations of psychological phenomena.

Topics will include: the brain and its hemispheres, stress and lie detection, sleep, dreaming, and consciousness, cognitive and moral development, Freud and personality, schizophrenia and depression, and social psychology across cultures.

Course Requirements

Five multiple-choice exams will test your understanding of the material. In-class exercises and the departmental research requirement (subject pool) will provide you with a close-up view of research methods. In addition to the class work, all Psychology 301 students must complete a research requirement by either participating in experimental sessions within the Psychology Dept. or by writing a research paper(the topic must be approved by the TA).

Grading Policy

The five tests. Your final grade in the course is based on your performance on the five exams -- and your turning in your writing assignments. There is no final exam in the course. The computation of your final grade is based on the following:

Lowest of your five tests = 0% Other 4 exams @22.5% each = 90%

Writing assignments. Five writing assignments are due over the course of the semester. You will be graded simply on whether or not you turn them in. Each writing assignment is worth 2%, all 5 count for 10%.

There is no extra credit for this course.

Tests are non-cumulative. The format of the test will be multiple-choice questions. You will be tested on the content of the textbook and lectures (including demonstrations and videos). Everyone is expected to take tests at the regularly scheduled time. The best 4 out of 5 exam grades will be used to determine the course grade. You can drop any of the exams for any reason BUT YOU MUST PASS THE LAST EXAM. If you do not pass the final exam, your score on that exam will count as one of your 4 grades. If you do pass the final exam, then the best 4 grades will used (irrespective of your score on the final exam).

Texts

Experience Psychology with Connect Plus Psychology Access Card, 1st Edition.  Laura A. King, University of Missouri---ISBN-13 9780077406578

PSY 394V • Smnr In Socl & Personality Psy

44210 • Spring 2010
Meets W 400pm-700pm SEA 1.332

Seminars in Social and Personality Psychology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 341K • Personality Assessment-W

44140 • Fall 2009
Meets T 330pm-630pm SEA 2.108

Psychology 341K: Assessment of Personality

Fall semester, 2009

 

This class will teach students about the principles and practice of assessing personality. The early lectures will start with basic methods (e.g., self-reports) and will use them to demonstrate fundamental measurement principles. The class will then focus on several specific methods for assessing personality. Throughout the course, demonstrations and exercises will be used to illustrate the lecture material.

 

Instructor:             Samuel Gosling, Ph.D.

Lecture hours:            Tue. 3.30-6.30 in SEA 2.108

Office hours:             Tue. 2:00-3:00

Office:             3.224 Seay Building

Phone:             471-1628

 

TA:            Lindsay Graham (lindsaytgraham@gmail.com; 232-9596); office hours: Mon 2-4 in SEA 3.426C

 

Texts:

Both books should be available at the Co-op but you might be able to find them cheaper online.

 

Psychometrics: An Introduction (by R. Michael Furr & Verne R. Bacharach, Sage, ISBN: 978-1412927604)

 

Snoop: What your stuff says about you (by Sam Gosling, Basic, ISBN: 978-0465013821)

 

In addition, topic-relevant course readings will be distributed throughout the course.

 

Class                        Topic                                                                                    Readings

 

Sept, 1st            Introduction & Background

                        What should we measure?

 

Sept, 8th            Methods: Unobtrusive measures           

 

Sept, 15th            Methods: Unobtrusive measures

 

Sept, 22            Methods: Self-reports

 

Sept, 29            Methods: Self-reports

 

Oct, 6                         Measurement & scale construction

 

Oct, 13            Measurement & scale construction           

 

Oct, 20            Midterm Exam (first half of class)

                        Methods: Behavior in situ

 

Oct, 27             Methods: Informant reports

 

Nov, 3                        Methods: Personality judgment           

 

Nov, 10            Methods: Trace measures            

 

Nov, 17              Methods: Interviews & biographical data

 

Nov, 24            Methods: Test data

 

Dec, 1                        Prediction paradigm & applications           

 

Examinations: Examinations will be held on Tuesday October 20th, and Wednesday December 9th (2-5pm), covering lectures, laboratory exercises, and readings covered so far.

 

"Lab" exercises:  Participation in class exercises and discussions is required.  If students miss classes, it is their responsibility to find out what they missed. 

 

Papers: Three papers will be due during the semester.  The final paper will be due at 5pm on Friday 4th December. Details on the nature of these papers will be discussed in class.  Late papers will receive a score of 0.  Part of the grade of each paper will be based on the quality of writing. It is each student's responsibility to be aware of the deadline and to start their paper in plenty of time.

 

Grading:

Mid-term examination 1 (Oct 20th)            10%

Final examination  (May 4th)                        10%

Lab exercises            (weekly)                        20%

Paper 1 (due Sept 29th)                        20%

Paper 2 (due Nov 10th)                        20%

Paper 3 (due Dec 4th)                                    20%           

            TOTAL                                    100%

 

Grades will be assigned as follows: A = 93-100; A- = 90-92; B+ = 87-89; B = 83-86; B- = 80-82; C+ = 77-79; C = 73-76; C- = 70-72; D+ = 67-69; D = 63-66; D- = 60-62; F = 0 -59.

 

NOTE: The Psychology Department will drop all students who do not meet the following prerequisites:

(a) PSY 301 with a C or better

(b) PSY 418 (or an equivalent listed in the course schedule) with a C or better

(c) Upper-Division standing (60 hours completed)

The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities.  For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TTY.

PSY 385N • Fundmntls Of Personality Psy

44245 • Fall 2009
Meets W 100pm-400pm SEA 1.332

Survey of important theories and research in personality psychology, with emphasis on current problems. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. A core course option. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 394V • Personality Thry And Research

44365 • Fall 2009
Meets W 100pm-400pm SEA 1.332

Seminars in Social and Personality Psychology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 394V • Smnr In Socl & Personality Psy

44375 • Fall 2009
Meets T 500pm-800pm SEA 3.250

Seminars in Social and Personality Psychology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

Publications



 

The Expression and Perception of Personality in Everyday Life

Back, M. D., Stopfer, J. M., Vazire, S., Gaddis, S., Schmukle, S. C., Egloff, B., & Gosling, S. D. (2010). Facebook profiles reflect actual personality not self-idealization. Psychological Science, 21, 372-374.


Carney, D. R., Jost, J. T., Gosling, S. D., & Potter, J. (2008). The secret lives of liberals and conservatives: Personality profiles, interaction styles, and the things they leave behind. Political Psychology, 29, 807-840.


Gebauer, J. E., Bleidorn, W., Gosling, S. D., Rentfrow, P. J., Lamb, M. E., & Potter, J. (in press). Cross-Cultural Variations in Big Five Relations with Religiosity: A Socio-Cultural Motives Perspective. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.


Gosling, S. D., Augustine, A. A., Vazire, S., Holtzman, N., & Gaddis, S. (2011). Manifestations of personality in Online Social Networks: Self-reported Facebook-related behaviors and observable profile information. Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, 14, 483-488. [DOI: 10.1089/cyber.2010.0087]


Gosling, S. D., Gaddis, S., & Vazire, S. (2008). First impressions based on the environments we create and inhabit. In N. Ambady, & J. J. Skowronski (Eds.), First Impressions (pp. 334-356). New York: Guilford.


Gosling, S. D., Gifford, R., & McCunn, L. (2013). The selection, creation, and perception of interior spaces: An environmental psychology approach. In G. Brooker & L. Weinthal (Eds.), The Handbook of Interior Design (pp. 278-290). Oxford, UK: Berg.


Gosling, S. D., Ko, S. J., Mannarelli, T., & Morris, M. E. (2002). A Room with a cue: Judgments of personality based on offices and bedrooms. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 82, 379-398. [Available in pdf]


Gosling, S. D., Sandy, C. J., & Potter, J. (2010). Personalities of self-identified “dog people” and “cat people.” Anthrozoös, 23, 213-222.


Graham, L. T., & Gosling, S. D. (2012). Impressions of World of Warcraft players’ personalities based on their usernames: Interobserver consensus but no accuracy.Journal of Research in Personality, 46, 599-603.


Graham, L. T., & Gosling, S. D. (2013). Personality profiles associated with different motivations for playing World of Warcraft. Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, 16, 189-193.


Graham, L. T., & Sandy, C. J., & Gosling, S. D. (2011). Manifestations of individual differences in physical and virtual environments. In T. Chamorro-Premuzic, S. von Stumm, & A. Furnham (Eds.), Handbook of Individual Differences (pp. 773-800). Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell.


Mehl, M. R., Gosling, S. D., & Pennebaker, J. W. (2006). Personality in its natural habitat: Manifestations and implicit folk theories of personality in daily life. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 90, 862-877.


Naumann, L. P., Vazire, S., Rentfrow, P. J., & Gosling, S. D. (2009). Personality judgments based on physical appearance. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 35, 1661-1671


Obschonka, M., Schmitt-Rodermund, E., Silbereisen, R. K., Gosling, S. D., & Potter, J. (2013). The regional distribution and correlates of an entrepreneurship-prone personality profile in the United States, Germany, and the United Kingdom: A socioecological perspective. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 105, 104-122[DOI: 10.1037/a0032275]


Rentfrow, P. J., Goldberg, L. R., Stillwell, D. J., Kosinski, M., Gosling, S. D., & Levitin, D. J. (2012). The song remains the same: A replication and extension of the MUSIC model. Music Perception, 30,161-185. [DOI: 10.1525/MP.2012.30.2.161]


Rentfrow, P. J., & Gosling, S. D. (2003). The do re mi’s of everyday life: The structure and personality correlates of music preferences. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 84, 1236-1256. [Available in pdf]


Rentfrow, P. J., & Gosling, S. D. (2006). Message in a Ballad: The role of music preferences in interpersonal perception. Psychological Science, 17, 236-242. [Available in pdf]


Rentfrow, P. J., & Gosling, S. D. (2007). The content and validity of music-genre stereotypes among college students. Psychology of Music, 35, 306-326.


Rentfrow, P. J., Gosling, S. D., Jokela, M., Stillwell, D. J., Kosinski, M., & Potter, J. (2013). Divided We Stand: Three Psychological Regions of the United States and their Political, Economic, Social, and Health Correlates. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 105, 996-1012. [DOI: 10.1037/a0034434]


Rentfrow, P. J., Gosling, S. D., & Potter, J. (2008). A theory of the emergence, persistence, and expression of geographic variation in psychological characteristics. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 3, 339-369.


Sandy, C. J., Gosling, S. D., & Durant, J. (2013). Predicting Consumer Behavior and Media Preferences: The Comparative Validity of Personality Traits and Demographic Variables. Psychology and Marketing, 30, 937-949. [DOI: 10.1002/mar.20657]


Swann, W. B., Jr., Rentfrow, P. J., & Gosling, S. D. (2003). The precarious couple effect: Verbally inhibited men + critical, disinhibited women = bad chemistry. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 85, 1095-1106. [Available in pdf]


Vazire, S., Naumann, L. P., Rentfrow, P. J., & Gosling, S. D. (2009). Smiling reflects different emotions in men and women. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 32, 403-405.


Vazire, S., Naumann, L. P., Rentfrow, P. J., & Gosling, S. D. (2008). Portrait of a narcissist: Manifestations of narcissism in physical appearance. Journal of Research in Personality, 42, 1439-1447.


Vazire, S. & Gosling, S. D. (2004). e-perceptions: Personality impressions based on personal websites. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 87, 123-132. [Available in pdf]


Wilson, R. E., Gosling, S. D., & Graham, L. T. (2012). A review of Facebook research in the social sciences. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 7, 203-220[DOI 10.1177/1745691612442904]


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Geographic/Spatial Distributions of Psychological Characteristics

Bleidorn, W., Klimstra, T. A., Denissen, J. J. A., Rentfrow, P. J., Potter, J. & Gosling, S. D. (2013). Personality Maturation Around the World: A Cross-Cultural Examination of Social Investment Theory. Psychological Science. [DOI: 10.1177/0956797613498396]


Bleidorn, W., Klimstra, T. A., Denissen, J. J. A., Rentfrow, P. J., Potter, J. & Gosling, S. D. (2014). Let the Data Speak – A Response to Terracciano (2014). Psychological Science. [DOI: 10.1177/0956797614521015]


de Vries, R., Gosling, S. D., & Potter, J. (2011). Income inequality and personality: Are less equal U.S. states less agreeable? Social Science and Medicine, 72, 1978-1985. [doi:10.1016/j.socscimed.2011.03.046]


Gebauer, J. E., Bleidorn, W., Gosling, S. D., Rentfrow, P. J., Lamb, M. E., & Potter, J. (in press). Cross-Cultural Variations in Big Five Relations with Religiosity: A Socio-Cultural Motives Perspective. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.


Obschonka, M., Schmitt-Rodermund, E., Silbereisen, R. K., Gosling, S. D., & Potter, J. (2013). The regional distribution and correlates of an entrepreneurship-prone personality profile in the United States, Germany, and the United Kingdom: A socioecological perspective. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 105, 104-122. [DOI: 10.1037/a0032275]


Rentfrow, P. J., Gosling, S. D., Jokela, M., Stillwell, D. J., Kosinski, M., & Potter, J. (2013). Divided We Stand: Three Psychological Regions of the United States and their Political, Economic, Social, and Health Correlates. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 105, 996-1012. [DOI: 10.1037/a0034434]


Rentfrow, P. J., Gosling, S. D., & Potter, J. (2008). A theory of the emergence, persistence, and expression of geographic variation in psychological characteristics.Perspectives on Psychological Science, 3, 339-369.


Rentfrow, P. J., Jost, J. T., Gosling, S. D., & Potter, J. (2009). Statewide differences in personality predict voting patterns in 1996-2004 U.S. presidential elections. In J. T. Jost, A. C. Kay, and H. Thorisdottir (Eds.) Social and Psychological Bases of Ideology and System Justification (pp. 314-347). Oxford University Press.


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Personality in Non-Human Animals

Bensky, M. K., Gosling, S. D., & Sinn, D. L. (2013). The World from a Dog’s Point of View: A Review and Synthesis of Dog Cognition Research. Advances in the Study of Behavior, 45, 209-406[DOI: 10.1016/B978-0-12-407186-5.00005-7]


Dall, S. R. X., Gosling, S. D., Brown, G. D. A., Dingermanse, N. J., Erev, I., Kocher, M., Schulz, L., Todd. P. E., Weissing, F. J., & Wolf, M. (2012). Variation in decision making. In P. Hammerstein & J. R. Stevens (Eds.), Evolution and the Mechanisms of Decision Making (pp. 243-272)Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.


Fratkin, J. L., Sinn. D. L., Thomas, S., Hilliard, S., Olson, Z., & Gosling, S. D. (in press). Do you see what I see?: Can non-experts with minimal training reproduce expert ratings in behavioral assessments of working dogs? Behavioural Processes.


Fratkin, J. L., Sinn, D. L., Patall, E. A., & Gosling, S. D. (2013). Personality consistency in dogs: A meta-analysis. PLOS ONE, 8, e54907. [DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0054907]


Freeman, H. D., Brosnan, S. F., Hopper, L. M., Lambeth, S. P., Schapiro, S. J., & Gosling, S. D. (2013). Developing a Comprehensive and Comparative Questionnaire for Measuring Personality in Chimpanzees using a Simultaneous Top-down/Bottom-up Design. American Journal of Primatology, 75, 1042–1053. [DOI: 10.1002/ajp.22168]


Freeman, H. D., & Gosling, S. D. (2010). Personality in nonhuman primates: A review and evaluation of past research. American Journal of Primatology, 71, 1-19.


Freeman, H. D., Gosling. S. D., & Schapiro, S. J. (2011). Comparison of methods for assessing personality in non-human primates. In A. Weiss, J. King, & L. Murray (Eds.),Personality and Behavioral Syndromes in Nonhuman Primates (pp. 17-40)New York: Springer.


Gosling, S. D. (1998). Personality dimensions in spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta). Journal of Comparative Psychology, 112, 107-118. [Available in pdf]


Gosling, S. D. (2001). From mice to men: What can we learn about personality from animal research? Psychological Bulletin, 127, 45-86. [Available in pdf]


Gosling, S. D. (2008). Personality in non-human animals. Social and Personality Psychology Compass, 2, 985-1002.


Gosling, S. D., & Bonnenburg, A. V. (1998). An integrative approach to personality research in anthrozoology: Ratings of six species of pets and their owners. Anthrozoös, 11, 184-156. [Available in pdf]


Gosling, S. D., & Graybeal, A. (2007). Tree Thinking: A New Paradigm for Integrating Comparative Data in Psychology. Journal of General Psychology, 134, 259-277.


Gosling, S. D. & Harley, B. A. (2009). Animal models of personality and cross-species comparisons. In P. Corr, & G. Matthews (Eds.), Cambridge Handbook of Personality Psychology (pp. 275-286). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.


Gosling, S. D., & John, O. P. (1999). Personality dimensions in non-human animals: A cross-species review. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 8, 69-75. [Available in pdf]


Gosling, S. D., Kwan, V. S. Y., & John, O. P. (2003). A dog’s got personality: A cross-species comparative approach to evaluating personality judgments. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 85, 1161-1169. [Available in pdf]


Gosling, S. D., & Mehta, P. H. (2013). Personalities in comparative perspective: What do human psychologists glean from animal personality studies? In C. Carere & D. Maestripieri (Eds.), Animal personalities: Behavior, physiology, and evolution (pp. 124-145)Chicago, IL: University Chicago Press.


Gosling, S. D., & Mollaghan, D. M. (2006). Animal research in social psychology: A bridge to functional genomics and other unique research opportunities. In P. A. M. van Lange (Ed.), Bridging Social Psychology: Benefits of Transdisciplinary Approaches (pp. 123-128). Mahweh NJ: Erlbaum.


Gosling, S. D., Sandy, C. J., & Potter, J. (2010). Personalities of self-identified “dog people” and “cat people.” Anthrozoös, 23, 213-222.


Gosling, S. D., & Vazire, S. (2002). Are we barking up the right tree? Evaluating a comparative approach to personality. Journal of Research in Personality, 36, 607-614. [Available in pdf]


Graham, L. T., & Gosling, S. D. (2009). Temperament and personality in working dogs. In W. S. Helton (Ed.), Canine ergonomics: The science of working dogs (pp. 63-81). Boca Raton: CRC Press.


Jones, A. C., & Gosling, S. D. (2005). Temperament and personality in dogs (Canis familiaris): A review and evaluation of past research. Applied Animal Behaviour Science, 95, 1-53. [Available in pdf]


Jones, A. C., & Gosling, S. D. (2008). Individual differences in approach and avoidance motivation in animals. In A. J. Elliot (Ed.), Handbook of Approach and Avoidance Motivation (pp. 165-185). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.


Kubinyi, E., Gosling, S. D., & Miklósi, Á (in press). A comparison of rating and coding activity-impulsivity and inattention in dogs. Acta Biologica Hungarica, 66.


Kwan, V. S. Y., Gosling, S. D., & John, O. P. (2008). Anthropomorphism as a special case of social perception: A cross-species comparative approach and a new empirical paradigm. Social Cognition, 26, 129-142.


McGarrity, M. E., Sinn, D. L., & Gosling, S. D. (in press). Which personality dimensions do puppy tests measure? A systematic procedure for categorizing behavioral assays.Behavioural Processes


Mehta, P. H., & Gosling, S. D. (2008). Bridging human and animal research: A comparative approach to studies of personality and health. Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, 22, 651-661.


Mehta, P. H., & Gosling, S. D. (2006). How can animal studies contribute to research on the biological bases of personality? In T. Canli (Ed.), Biology of Personality and Individual Differences (pp. 427-448). New York: Guilford. [email me for a reprint]


Rocznik, D., Sinn, D. L., Thomas, S., & Gosling, S. D. (in press). Criterion analysis and content validity for standardized behavioral tests in a detector-dog breeding program.Journal of Forensic Sciences.


Sinn, D. L., Gosling, S. D., & Hilliard, S. J. (2010). Personality and performance in military working dogs: reliability and predictive validity of behavioral tests. Applied Animal Behaviour Science, 127, 51-65.


Sinn, D. L., Gosling, S. D., & Moltschaniwskyj, N. A. (2008). Development of shy/bold behaviour in squid: Context-specific phenotypes associated with developmental plasticity. Animal Behaviour, 75, 433-442.


Vazire, S., & Gosling, S. D. (2003). Bridging Psychology and Biology with animal research. American Psychologist, 58, 407-408. [Available in pdf]


Vazire, S., Gosling, S. D., Dickey, A. S., & Schaprio, S. J. (2007). Measuring personality in nonhuman animals. In R.W. Robins, R. C. Fraley, & R. F. Krueger (Eds.), Handbook of Research Methods in Personality Psychology (pp. 190-206). New York: Guilford.


Weinstein, T. A. R., Capitanio, J. P., & Gosling, S. D. (2008). Personality in Animals. In John, O. P., Robins, R. W., & Pervin, L. A. (Eds.), Handbook of Personality Theory and Research (pp. 328-348). New York: Guilford.


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Internet Methods

Buhrmester, M., Kwang, T., & Gosling, S. D. (2011). Amazon’s Mechanical Turk: A new source of inexpensive, yet high-quality, data? Perspectives on Psychological Science, 6, 3-5. [email Michael Buhrmester for a reprint]


Gosling, S. D., & Johnson, J. A. (Eds). (2010). Advanced Methods for Behavioral Research on the Internet. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.


Gosling, S. D., & Mason, W. (2015). Internet research in Psychology. Annual Review of Psychology, 66, 877-902. [pdf available here]


Gosling, S. D., Sandy, C. J., John, O. P., & Potter, J. (2010). Wired but not WEIRD: The promise of the Internet in reaching more diverse samples. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 33, 94-95.


Gosling, S. D., & Vazire, S., Srivastava, S., & John, O. P. (2004). Should we trust Web-based studies? A comparative analysis of six preconceptions about Internet questionnaires. American Psychologist, 59, 93-104. [Available in pdf]


Reis, H. T., & Gosling, S. D. (2010). Social psychological methods outside the laboratory. In S. T. Fiske, D. T. Gilbert, & G. Lindzey, (Eds.), Handbook of Social Psychology (5th ed., vol. 1, pp. 82-114). New York: Wiley.


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Personality and Political Orientation

Carney, D. R., Jost, J. T., Gosling, S. D., & Potter, J. (2008). The secret lives of liberals and conservatives: Personality profiles, interaction styles, and the things they leave behind. Political Psychology, 29, 807-840.


Gosling, S. D., & Srivastava, S. (2011). Changes in perceptions of George W. Bush’s personality in the wake of the September 11 2001 World Trade Center attacks. Acta de Investigación Psicológica, 3, 486-490.

Jost, J. T., Napier, J. L., Thorisdottir, H., Gosling, S. D., Palfai, T. P., & Ostafin, B. (2007). Are Needs to Manage Uncertainty and Threat Associated with Political Conservatism or Ideological Extremity? Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 33, 989-1007.


Jost, J. T., Nosek, B. A., & Gosling, S. D. (2008). Ideology: Its resurgence in social, personality, and political psychology. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 3, 126-136.


Jost, J. T., & West, T. V., & Gosling, S. D. (2009). Personality and ideology as determinants of candidate preferences and “Obama conversion” in the 2008 U.S. presidential election. Du Bois Review, 6, 103-124. [Reprinted in Spanish as Jost, J. T., West, T. V., & Gosling, S. D. (2010). La Conversión a Obama: Personalidad e ideología como determinantes de las preferencias de candidato en la elección presidencial americana de 2008. Psicología Política, 40, 31-60.]


Rentfrow, P. J., Jost, J. T., Gosling, S. D., & Potter, J. (2009). Statewide differences in personality predict voting patterns in 1996-2004 U.S. presidential elections. In J. T. Jost, A. C. Kay, and H. Thorisdottir (Eds.) Social and Psychological Bases of Ideology and System Justification (pp. 314-347). Oxford University Press.


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Personality Change and Development

Bleidorn, W., Klimstra, T. A., Denissen, J. J. A., Rentfrow, P. J., Potter, J. & Gosling, S. D. (2013). Personality Maturation Around the World: A Cross-Cultural Examination of Social Investment Theory. Psychological Science. [DOI: 10.1177/0956797613498396]


Bleidorn, W., Klimstra, T. A., Denissen, J. J. A., Rentfrow, P. J., Potter, J. & Gosling, S. D. (2014). Let the Data Speak – A Response to Terracciano (2014). Psychological Science.[DOI: 10.1177/0956797614521015]


Robins, R. W., Trzesniewski, K. H., Tracy, J. L., Gosling, S. D., & Potter, J. (2002). Global self-esteem across the lifespan. Psychology and Aging, 17, 423-434. [Available in pdf]


Soto, C. J., John, O. P., Gosling, S. D., & Potter, J. (2008). The developmental psychometrics of Big Five self-reports: Acquiescence, factor structure, coherence, and differentiation from ages 10 to 20. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 94, 718-737.


Soto, C. J., John, O. P., Gosling, S. D., & Potter, J. (2011). Age Differences in Personality Traits from 10 to 65: Big-Five Domains and Facets in a Large Cross-Sectional Sample.Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 100, 330-348.


Srivastava, S., John, O. P., Gosling, S. D., & Potter, J. (2003). Development of personality in early and middle adulthood: Set like plaster or persistent change? Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 84, 1041-1053. [Available in pdf]


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Scales and Measurement

Denissen, J. J. A., Geenen, R., van Aken, M. A. G., Gosling, S. D., & Potter, J. (2008). Development and validation of a Dutch translation of the Big Five Inventory (BFI). Journal of Personality Assessment, 90, 152-157.


Gosling, S. D., Craik, K. H., Martin, N. R., & Pryor, M. R. (2005). The Personal Living Space Cue Inventory: An analysis and evaluation. Environment and Behavior, 37, 683-705. [Available in pdf]


Gosling, S. D., Craik, K. H., Martin, N. R., & Pryor, M. R. (2005). Material attributes of Personal Living Spaces. Home Cultures, 2, 51-88. [Available in pdf]


Gosling, S. D., John, O. P., Craik, K. H., & Robins, R. W. (1998). Do people know how they behave? Self-reported act frequencies compared with on-line codings by observers. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 74, 1337-1349. [Available in pdf]


Gosling, S. D., Rentfrow, P. J., & Swann, W. B., Jr. (2003). A Very Brief Measure of the Big Five Personality Domains. Journal of Research in Personality, 37, 504-528. [Available in pdf]


Muck, P. M., Hell, B., & Gosling, S. D. (2007). Construct Validation of a short Five-Factor Model Instrument: A Self-Peer Study on the German Adaptation of the Ten-Item Personality Inventory (TIPI-G). European Journal of Personality Assessment, 23, 166-175.


Oshio, A., Abe, S., Cutrone, P., & Gosling, S. D. (in press). Further validity of the Japanese version of the Ten Item Personality Inventory (TIPI-J): Cross-language evidence for content validity. Journal of Individual Differences.


Oshio, A., Abe, S., Cutrone, P., & Gosling, S. D. (2013). Big Five content representation of the Japanese version of the Ten-Item Personality Inventory. Psychology, 4, 924-929. [DOI: 10.4236/psych.2013.412133]


Ramírez-Esparza, N., Gosling, S. D., Benet-Martínez, V., Potter, J. P., & Pennebaker, J. W. (2006). Do bilinguals have two personalities? A special case of cultural frame switching. Journal of Research in Personality, 40, 99-120.


Ramírez-Esparza, N., Gosling, S. D., & Pennebaker, J. W. (2008). Parodox lost: Unraveling the puzzle of Simpatia. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 39, 685-702.


Reis, H. T., & Gosling, S. D. (2010). Social psychological methods outside the laboratory. In S. T. Fiske, D. T. Gilbert, & G. Lindzey, (Eds.), Handbook of Social Psychology (5th ed., vol. 1, pp. 82-114). New York: Wiley.


Renau, V., Oberst, U., Gosling, S. D., Rusiñol, J., & Chamarro, A (2013). Translation and validation of the Ten-Item-Personality Inventory into Spanish and Catalan. Aloma. Revista de Psicologia, Ciències de l’Educació i de l’Esport, 31, 85-97.


Sandy, C. J., Gosling, S. D., & Koelkebeck, T. (in press). Psychometric Comparison of Automated vs. Rational Methods of Scale Abbreviation: An Illustration using a Brief Measure of Values. Journal of Individual Differences.


Soto, C. J., John, O. P., Gosling, S. D., & Potter, J. (2008). The developmental psychometrics of Big Five self-reports: Acquiescence, factor structure, coherence, and differentiation from ages 10 to 20. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 94, 718-737.


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Historical Trends in Psychology

Robins, R. W., Gosling, S. D., & Craik, K. H. (1998). Psychological science at the crossroads. The American Scientist, 86, 310-313. [Available in pdf]


Robins, R. W., Gosling, S. D., & Craik, K. H. (1999). An empirical analysis of trends in psychology. American Psychologist, 54, 117-128. [Available in pdf]


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Others

Anderson, C. P., Ames, D. R., & Gosling, S. D. (2008) Punishing hubris: The perils of status self-enhancement in teams and organizations. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 34, 90-101.


Erdle, S., Gosling, S. D., & Potter, J. (2009). Does self-esteem account for the higher-order factors of the Big Five? Journal of Research in Personality, 43, 921-922.


Gosling, S. D., Sandy, C. J., & Potter, J. (2010). Personalities of self-identified “dog people” and “cat people.” Anthrozoös, 23, 213-222.


Gosling, S. D., & Srivastava, S. (2011). Changes in perceptions of George W. Bush’s personality in the wake of the September 11 2001 World Trade Center attacks. Acta de Investigación Psicológica, 3, 486-490.


Jost, J. T., Hawkins, C. B., Nosek, B. A., Hennes, E. P., Stern, C., Gosling, S. D., & Graham, J. (2014). Belief in a Just God (and a Just Society): A System Justification Perspective on Religious Ideology. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology, 34,56-81[Translated to: Jost, J. T., Hawkins, C. B., Nosek, B. A., Hennes, E. P., Stern, C., Gosling, S. D., & Graham, J. (in press). Creencia en un dios justo: La Religión como una forma de Justificación del Sistema. Psicologia Politica, 47, 55-89.]


Mathieu, M. T., & Gosling, S. D. (2012). The accuracy or inaccuracy of affective forecasts depends on how the question is framed: A meta-analysis of past studies.Psychological Science, 23, 161-162. [DOI: 10.1177/0956797611427044]


Pennebaker, J. W., Gosling, S. D., & Ferrell, J. (2013). Daily online testing in large classes: Boosting college performance while reducing achievement gaps. PLOS ONE, 9,e79774[doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0079774]


Ramírez-Esparza, N., Gosling, S. D., & Pennebaker, J. W. (2008). Paradox lost: Unraveling the puzzle of Simpatia. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 39, 685-702.


Robins, R. W., Tracy, J. L., Trzesniewski, K. H., Potter, J., & Gosling, S. D. (2001). Personality correlates of self-esteem. Journal of Research in Personality, 35, 463-482. [Available in pdf]


Vazire, S., Naumann, L. P., Rentfrow, P. J., & Gosling, S. D. (2009). Smiling reflects different emotions in men and women. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 32, 403-405.


Wood, D., Gosling, S. D., & Potter, J. (2007). Normality evaluations and their relation to personality traits and well-being. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 93, 861-879.


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Research


Everyday Manifestations of Personality

This work explores how personality is revealed in real-world contexts in everyday life. I am especially interested in how individuals select and craft the environments in which they dwell to suit their personalities. I argue that individuals consciously and unconsciously leave traces of their individuality in the spaces around them. In turn, others may use these traces to form impressions about the occupants. Some of these impressions are accurate but others are not. I am becomingly increasingly interested in how individuals use their space to regulate their cognitive and emotional states (e.g., by sitting in certain parts of the room or going to particular neighborhoods); this last area of research is driving my interest in geographical analyses of psychological traits. My collaborators and I examine a number of different environments:


Animal Personality

This work examines personality or temperament in non-human animals. The ultimate goal of this work is to: (a) develop animal models to inform research in personality, social, and health psychology, (b) use perceptions of animal personality to understand general processes in personality perception, (c) apply our understanding of personality to promote animal and human welfare.


Methods for Collecting Data Useful for Research in the Social Sciences

Since 1996 we have been collecting data using the internet. In addition to reaping the benefits of Internet research (e.g., large and relatively diverse samples), we are also evaluating the costs and benefits of using the Internet to gather data in psychology.

People of Gosling Lab


Graduate Students

Recent Collaborators

Lab Alumni

(keep in touch! Please drop me an email when you get a chance)

Books


Advanced Methods for Conducting Online Behavioral Research

Advanced Methods for Conducting Online Behavioral Research

Samuel D. Gosling

Advanced Methods for Conducting Online Behavioral Research
January 2010
American Psychological Association

 

Snoop: What Your Stuff Says About You


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  • Department of Psychology

    The University of Texas at Austin
    SEA 4.208
    108 E. Dean Keeton Stop A8000
    Austin, TX 78712-1043
    512-471-1157