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Schusterman Center for Jewish Studies Presents Free Film Screenings

Monday April 12, 2010
7:00 PM - 9:00 PM • Mezes Hall (various rooms)

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The Schusterman Center for Jewish Studies will host free film screenings at the 8th annual Austin Jewish Film Festival:

"Adam Resurrected"

April 12,  Mezes Hall, Room: 1.306, 7 p.m.

The movie follows the story of Adam Stein, a charismatic patient at a mental institution for Holocaust survivors in Israel, 1961. He reads minds and confounds his doctors, lead by Nathan Gross. Before the war, in Berlin, Adam was an entertainer--cabaret impresario, circus owner, magician, musician--loved by audiences and Nazis alike until he finds himself in a concentration camp, confronted by Commandant Klein. Adam survives the camp by becoming the Commandant's "dog", entertaining him while his wife and daughter are sent off to die. Years later we find him at the Institute. One day, Adam smells something, hears a sound. "Who brought a dog in here?" he asks Gross. Gross denies there is a dog but Adam finds him--a young boy raised in a basement on a chain. Adam and the boy see and recognize each other as dogs--and their journey begins. "Adam Resurrected" is the story of a man who once was a dog who meets a dog who once was a boy.

"Bruriah"

April 14, Mezes Hall, Basement level, Room: 0.306, 7 p.m.

Bruriah and her husband Rabbi Meir lived in the second century C.E., at which time the Rabbis declared that "women are light-minded." 

Bruriah, a most learned and intelligent woman, mocked their statement. In order to prove their justification, Rabbi Meir sent one of his students to seduce her. Bruriah was seduced and when she discovered that her husband had planned it, she committed suicide.This story infiltrates and creates turmoil in the life of a religious, Jerusalem family in 2008. The heroine of the film, who also bears the name Bruriah, struggles with a childhood trauma: a life of excommunication which was forced on her following the publication of her father's book on the same subject. Bruriah goes in search of the one copy of the book, which may have survived. Her husband opposes her quest. Bruriah's desire to find that copy represents a threat to the way of life that he has created for his family. But Bruriah is unwilling to give up. 

The search for the book becomes a crusade during which she faces the compromises she has made in her life, her desires, and her limitations. Her husband Yaacov, faced with no alternative, decides to prove to his wife that really "women are light-minded."

"The Wedding Song"

 April 15, Mezes Hall, Basement level, Room: 0.306, 7 p.m.

Two young women find that their differences bring them closer during a difficult time in this drama from writer-director Karin Albou. Nour (Olympe Borval) and Myriam (Lizzie Brochere) grew up in the same neighborhood in Tunis, and as they've grown into adulthood they've stayed close friends, even though Nour is a Muslim and Myriam is Jewish. It's 1942, and Tunis is under occupation by Axis forces, which has made life difficult for both women: the German authorities have prevented Khaled (Najib Oudghiri), Nour's fiancee, from getting a job, forcing them to postpone their wedding, while Myriam's family must pay exorbitant fines for being Jewish, which may lead her into a marriage of convenience to a wealthy physician (Simon Abkarian) many years her senior.