Department of Sociology

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

44265-44290 • Shapira, Harel
Meets MW 900am-1000am ART 1.102
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Description   This course will introduce you to what it means to think about the world like a sociologist. Over the course of the semester, we will read a little bit about a lot of things: culture, race, the economy, crime, cities, to name just a few. In each case, our focus will be on understanding what a sociological analysis of the topic would entail. We will talk about how sociologists analyze big changes taking place in the world like large scale economic change, but also how they examine small everyday situations like going to a movie theatre. Along the way we will also talk about major theoretical approaches to the study of society developed by the “founding” fathers of sociology: Karl Marx, Max Weber, and Emile Durkheim. By the end of the course you should be able to think about the world in a sociological way, including being able to ask sociological questions and develop sociological schemes for acquiring answers.

 


SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

44295-44414 • Regnerus, Mark
Meets TTH 930am-1030am SAC 1.402
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Description

Sociology 302 will offer insights to understand how social forces in society shape our behavior and influence our being. After all, we are the product of our society and vice versa. Our identity, hopes, fears, grievances and satisfactions derive from the patterns of socialization orchestrated within human groups. In this class, you will become familiar with the nature of sociology, macro-micro perspectives, sociological approaches, and concepts such as culture, socialization, social structures, social interaction, self and society, institutions, stratification, gender inequality, love, marriage, and divorce. Finally, we explore the sociology of health and the mind-body connection. In this course, we will: a) create an environment that encourages active participation and discussion in the learning process; b) Use a variety of techniques in the teaching and learning process, and c) we will assess and evaluate your work and give timely feedback.

Grading Policy

A short project paper (4-5 pages) 20% 

Three exams 20% each

Class participation and group projects 10%

Pop quizzes 10%

Class Attendance: Regular attendance is required. The repercussion of being absent a total of 4 or more classes, without justifiable reason, is that the final grade will automatically be lowered by one letter.

Texts

James M. Henslin, Sociology: A Down to Earth Approach, 2007, (seventh or eight editions)

Reading Packet: in addition to your general sociology text, you are provided with more readings on certain topics for in-depth analysis and discussion. These readings are photocopied articles available as a packet under my name at: Paradigm (407 W. 24th St)


SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

44325-44350 • Haghshenas, Hossein
Meets MW 1000am-1100am JES A121A
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Course Description

This course will closely examine how social forces in society shape our behavior and penetrate our being. After all, we are all the product of our society and vice versa. Our identities, hopes, fears, grievances and satisfactions derive from the patterns of socialization orchestrated within human groups. In this class, students will be introduced to the basic concept of sociological imagination and principles of sociological reasoning. Many societal issues will be examined through the practice of classical theories and sociological perspectives. As we journey through the course, students will become more familiar with the nature of sociology, social construction of reality, micro and macro sociological analysis, and concepts such as culture, socialization, social structures, self and society, stratification, gender inequality, love, marriage, and divorce. Finally, the course will explore the sociology of health, medicine, and the mind-body connection.

Grading Policy

Research paper 24% 

Three exams 60%

Class project and participation 8%

Quiz 8%

Texts

James M. Henslin, Sociology: A Down to Earth Approach (eighth or ninth edition), 2008Reading packet available at Paradigm (407 W. 24th St.)


SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

44355-44380 • Fulton, Kelly
Meets TTH 100pm-200pm WCH 1.120
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Course Description

How are our individual choices shaped by society? How do our choices help shape society? These are two primary questions we will address in Introduction to the Study of Society. The sociological imagination will be one of our primary tools as we explore society and our place within it. Since we are studying society and therefore ourselves, opportunities to use our sociological imaginations are all around us - in our everyday interactions, in institutions such as education or our families, and in global events.

The first part of the course explores some of the ways sociologists view society, and also how we study the social world. In addition, we will examine culture, socialization, and deviance. The second part of the course focuses on inequalities. Stratification takes many forms; we will explore social class, race and ethnicities, and gender.

Grading Policy

Three in-class multiple choice, short answer and essay tests 45% (15% each)

Sociological exercises - several short written assignments 20%

Sociological perspective (group project) – 20%

Class participation, including individual and group activities during lecture and discussion sections 15%

 Texts

Conley, Dalton, You May Ask Yourself: An Introduction to Thinking Like a Sociologist, 

Third Edition, 2013.  New York: W.W. Norton and Company.

McIntyre, Lisa J., The Practical Skeptic: Readings in Sociology, Sixth Edition, 2013.

Boston: McGraw-Hill.

Nathan, Rebekah, My Freshman Year: What a Professor Learned by Becoming a

Student, Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2006. Penguin Books.

 

 

 


SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

44385-44410 • Green, Penny A
Meets TTH 200pm-300pm MEZ 1.306
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Description:  

This course introduces the science of Sociology by focusing on five broad topics: (1) What is Sociology? (2) The Individual and Society, (3) Social Institutions, (4) Social Inequality, and (5) Globalization and Social Change.  In the process, we’ll examine important concepts, theories, and methodologies used by sociologists working on both the micro and macro levels.  We’ll look at interconnections between social institutions (i.e., the family, education, the economy), as well as the way in which institutional change has caused widening income inequality in the U.S. and around the world.  Widening inequality has had particularly negative consequences for men of color and women of all races and ethnicities.  Finally, we’ll examine the process of globalization and some of its economic, political, and cultural consequences.  Much of the data that we look at will focus on the U.S., but given our increasingly interconnected world, other societies will be considered as well.  Class format will be primarily lecture, due to class size.  We’ll try to demonstrate Sociology’s relevance to everyday life, as well as public policy making.

 Required Readings: 

Introduction to Sociology (2014, 9th ed., Seagull) by Giddens, Duneier, Appelbaum, and Carr. W.W. Norton.

Any additional readings will be made available in a packet and/or on Blackboard

Attendance Policy:

Good academic performance requires regular attendance and punctuality.  Students are allowed three (3) non-penalized absences during the semester (excluding our introductory class meeting), regardless of whether these absences are from lecture or lab.  These non-penalized absences are intended to cover such circumstances as illness, family emergencies, university scheduled events, etc.  Students who miss more than three classes, regardless of the reason, will have their semester grades reduced by one full percentage points for each absence beyond the three allowed.  The one exception to this policy concerns absences for religious reasons, assuming advance, written notification is given. 

Grading Policy:

Exams (3-4)      70%               

Pop Quizzes:        15%               

Paper (2-3 pages)         15%                                                       


SOC 304 • Envrnmntl Inequality/Health

44415 • Spangenberg, Emily
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am CLA 1.106
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Description:    This course examines the social roots and impacts of environmental contamination and natural disasters. It will emphasize how environmental health inequalities are linked to social inequalities (race, class, gender, and nation) and how people respond to environmental risks. Drawing from academic texts, documentary films, and photo essays, we will explore how urban planning and economic development policies create environmental inequalities, both in the United States and globally, and how social movements define and address environmental health hazards.  We will analyze case studies to illustrate key theoretical concepts in the environmental health field, including: hazardous materials siting in the U.S., the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, nuclear testing in the Western U.S., pesticide use in industrial agriculture, the Chernobyl meltdown in Ukraine, the Bhopal chemical disaster in India, mining and oil exploitation, and the global toxic waste trade.  

SOC 307C • Amer Families Past And Present

44420 • McZeal, Corey
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm CLA 1.106
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Description

This course examines sociological trends over time in specific aspects of family life, including marriage, cohabitation, mate selection, divorce, parenthood, family structure, and work-family balance. Explores how both individual actions and structural changes influence these trends.

Readings

There will be required weekly readings  of journal articles and newspaper articles.

Grading (tentative)

Two exams, two papers, and multiple in-class writing assignments as assessment

 


SOC 307D • Capital Punishment In America

44424 • Perez, Marcos
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CLA 1.104
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Description:

Why does the United States continue to use the death penalty when nearly every other industrialized Western nation has abolished its use? What explains the persistence of this type of punishment in our society? This course explores capital punishment's past, present and future in America. Using academic sources as well as journalistic case studies, we will examine how the death penalty is currently implemented in the United States and abroad, study the history of capital punishment in this country, discuss different perspectives that shed light on the issue, and explore the debates regarding the morality, legality and efficacy of the death penalty.

By the end of the semester, students will have an extensive understanding of the role that capital punishment plays in American society. Readings and class activities are intended to familiarize them with issues such as the various arguments for and against the death penalty; the changes in public opinion about the subject; the different US Supreme Court decisions on the matter; the influence of race and class in sentencing and executions; the historical legacy of lynching; and the dilemmas posed by the way capital punishment is applied today.

Required Readings and Materials: 

There is no formal text for the course. All required readings will be posted on Blackboard under “Course Documents”, organized by the date on which they are due.

Grading Policy:

The course requires students to complete two exams and write a research paper. In addition, there is a class participation component, and an extra credit assignment.

Exams: There will be two exams that will consist of multiple-choice and true-false questions. Each exam will constitute 30% of your final grade.

Research Paper: You will write a 5-8 page paper, in which you will analyze a topic related to the class. You will be required to state a main question, research the subject, and elaborate your argument in a professional style. Your grade in this assignment will represent 35% of your final grade.

Class participation: Each student is expected to contribute in a meaningful way to in-class discussions. Consequently, 5% of your final grade will be based on your participation in class.

 Extra credit assignment: Students who wish to do so can sign up for an individual presentation about their papers at the end of the semester, in which they will introduce their arguments to the class, and answer questions from their peers and instructor. This is an optional assignment which adds up to 5 points (out of 100) to your final grade. 


SOC 307F • Diversity In Amer Families

44427 • Fulton, Kelly
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm MEZ 1.120
(also listed as WGS 301)
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Description:

 

This course will provide a broad examination of the diversity of American families and current debates about family life from a sociological perspective, with an emphasis on how gender, race/ethnicity, social class, and sexualities shape experiences and definitions of family. The course will cover theoretical perspectives on family and kinship as well as recent trends in several aspects of family life, including cohabitation, marriage and divorce, parenthood, family policy, and family structure. Specific attention will be given to marginalized family types, including LGBT families, immigrant families, and interracial families.

 


SOC 307G • Culture And Society In The US

44430 • Buggs, Shantel
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm CLA 1.106
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Description

This course explores the meanings of culture in contemporary U.S. society, with a focus on cultural representation and cultural (re)production. Course readings and lectures will introduce students to theoretical perspectives on cultural production and representation, emphasizing how culture shapes our experiences and understandings of social phenomena such as class, race, sexuality, and gender. The class will be particularly concerned with the role cultural representation plays in the reproduction of inequality, and therefore will ask students to turn a critical lens toward the cultural practices and representations around them.

Readings

students should anticipate weekly assigned readings.

Grading

Writing assignments and exams

 


SOC 307K • Fertility And Reproduction

44435 • Glass, Jennifer
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CLA 0.102
(also listed as WGS 301)
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Description

Why do birth rates rise and fall?  How can the U.S. have both record rates of childlessness as well as the highest rates of teen childbearing and unwanted pregnancy in the industrialized world?  Why does educating women lower birth rates faster than any population control program in the Third World?  This course will explore when, why, how, and with whom Americans bear children, and how we compare to other developed and developing countries in the world.  We will explore infertility and its treatments, the ethics of surrogacy, voluntary childlessness, the rapid rise of nonmarital childbearing in the U.S. and other countries, the politics of childbirth and risks of maternal mortality in developed and developing countries, and the declining populations and rapid aging  of  rich countries including Japan, Italy, and Spain where women have basically stopped having children. 


SOC 307P • Intro Soc Of Health/Well-Being

44437 • Grajeda, Erika D
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 1
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Description:

This course provides an introduction to the study of social and cultural factors that shape health and the body. The readings will focus on: the historical construction of the modern medicalized body; dominant bio-medical assumptions of health and illness; the moral and cultural dimensions of defining and enforcing “health”; how social structure affects the body, health and well being; and how technologies are used to produce healthy bodies – all while complicating our understandings of health and what one should do to be healthy. By the end of the semester, students will understand how health is a social and cultural designation (not just a biological one). Throughout the course, we will focus on race, gender, sexuality, and disability as centrally important to the study of health and the body.

Requirements:

Attendance to class is mandatory. You may miss up to two classes without affecting your grade. Subsequently, for every class you miss your grade will fall by 1/2 a grade. For example, if you miss four classes, you grade will change from an A to a B. I also expect students to read the assigned material before class. There will be no exams. Instead there will be: “surprise” pop-quizzes, one group presentation, two papers and in-class discussion. The paper will be discussed and elaborated upon during the course of the semester.

 Readings:

There is no textbook for this course. Instead, I will compile a Course Pack which will be available at TBD. Additional readings will be posted on Canvas (http://canvas.utexas.edu). I reserve the right to change the reading schedule during the course for any reason; any changes to the reading will be announced on Canvas.

Grades Distribution:

Surprise Pop-Quizzes                        20 points

In-class Group Presentation:              25 points

Essay #1:                                        25 points

Essay #2:                                        30 points

                                                      100 points total


SOC 308D • Ethncty & Gender: La Chicana

44440 • Uzendoski, Andrew G.
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CMA 3.114
(also listed as AMS 315, MAS 311, WGS 301)
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The purpose of this course is to examine the various experiences, perspectives, and expressions of Chicanas in the United States. This involves examining the meaning and history of the term “Chicana” as it was applied to and incorporated by Mexican American women during the Chicano Movement in areas of the Southwest U.S., such as Texas and California. We will also explore what it means to be Chicana in the United States today. The course will begin with a historical overview of Mexican American women's experiences in the U.S., including the emergence of Chicana feminism. We will discuss central concepts of Chicana feminism and attempt to understand how those concepts link to everyday lived experiences. Specifically, the relationship between gender, race/ethnicity, and class will be key as we discuss issues that have been significant in the experiences and self-identification of Chicanas, such as: family, gender, sexuality, religion/spirituality, education, language, labor, and political engagement. We will engage in interdisciplinary analysis not only concerning cultural traditions, values, belief systems, and symbols but also concerning the expressive culture of Chicanas, including folk and religious practices, literature and poetry, the visual arts, and music. Finally, we will examine media representations of Chicanas through critical analyses of film and television portrayals.

 


SOC 308K • Social Change And The Future

44445 • Sobering, Katherine
Meets MWF 900am-1000am CLA 1.106
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Course Description

Inequality is a defining issue of our time. Income inequality has increased significantly and gender, racial/ethnic and class inequities largely define people’s life chances. But what can we do about these pressing social problems? Some propose taxation, others call for an increase in the minimum wage and better social services. Still others consider inequality at it source: “If you don’t want inequality, don’t distribute income unequally in the first place” (Wolff quoted in Dewan 2012).  This course zooms in on the workplace as a possible site of social change. It will begin by taking students back to the Industrial Revolution to examine the emergence of work under capitalism and the production of inequality in work organizations. Next, it will introduce theories of inequality and examine alternative work organizations such as worker cooperatives, analyzing how they compare to capitalist workplaces and how they may address workplace inequality. The second half of the course provides students an opportunity to critically evaluate four proposals to address inequality in the workplace. Overall, the three main learning objectives are: (1) to provide students with a historical understanding of the emergence and nature of capitalist work arrangements; (2) to introduce theories that explain the emergence and persistence of inequality in the workplace; and (3) to critically examine proposals for the future of work.  

Readings  

This course draws on a variety of readings, including book chapters, journal articles and articles from popular media. All journal articles can be downloaded off the Univeristy of Texas Libraries website. Book chapters can be found in PDF form on Canvas. All books can be purchased in the University Co-op or online. One copy of each will be put on reserve at the PCL.

Exams and Grading

The final grade in the course is made up of a mid-term exam (35%), which will be given the week before spring break, four assignments (20%), regular class participation (10%) and a project (35%) that is due at the end of the semester. There is no final exam for this course.

 


SOC 308L • Socl Trnsfmtn Love/Rltnshps

44450 • Haghshenas, Hossein
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm CLA 0.102
(also listed as MES 310)
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“All the particles of the world are in love and looking for lovers.” --Rumi

 OBJECTIVES

Sociology 308 examines the social, psychological, spiritual, and historical perspectives toward love and intimacy. It focuses on the cross-cultural diversity of passionate love and sexuality from early civilization in the East and West to the modern era. The course will offer insights to understand how love and intimacy interact with rapid social, economic, and cultural change, and how the subsequent change transformed the social world and the meaning of love. As we journey through this course, you will become familiar with: the aspects of self and identity; differentiation in the context of love in the modern age; the family and the individual; the impact of industrialization and capitalism on private lives and the public order; gender, love, and communication; love, health, and socialization; intercultural love and intimacy; personal choice and arranged marriages. Finally, we will look at the current state of love and aggression in modern democracies.  This course brings some of the current research and thinking, not only from the social perspective, but also from a wide variety of intellectual disciplines. Artistic films, documentaries, and other media will be presented as technical methods of representation of "social reality" to better understand and experience the subject.

 Readings: Course Packet – a selection of articles has been prepared in a packet available at Paradigm (407 W. 24thSt.)

*Assigned readings with asterisk below can be found on Blackboard: http://courses.utexas.edu          

Format and Attendance: This course will use a combination lecture-discussion style format, with more emphasis on discussion. Attendance will be taken on a regular basis. Regular attendance is required and I expect that students will come to all classes- both lectures and discussions. Please note that: the repercussion of being absent a total of 4 or more classes for the entire spring semester (without justifiable reason) is that your grade will automatically be lowered by one letter. Unexcused absences will count against your grade.

 Grades: Are assigned based on the standard scale: 93-100%= A; 90-92.9% = A-; 87-89.9% = B+; 83-86.9%=B; 80-82.9%= B-; 77-79.9% = C+; 73-76.9%= C; 70-72.9%=C-; 67-69.9% = D+; 63-66.9= D; 60-62.9%= D-; <60 = F.  There are no grading curves.

1) A research paper (4 – 5 pages) OR group paper (10 – 15 pages) on the subject of love, intimacy, relationships, or related issues. Course project and presentations constitute 25% of the final grade. The project is central to the course and the topic must be chosen by the student and/or the group and approved by the teaching assistant and the instructor.

2) Two exams 50% (each exam counts 25%)

3) Quizzes 9%

4) Class participation/group discussions 16%


SOC 308M • Sociology Of Identity

44455 • Robinson, Brandon
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm CLA 1.104
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Course Description

The New York Times called 2015 “The Year We Obsessed Over Identity.” From Laverne Cox and Caitlyn Jenner to Rachel Dolezal and “Key & Peele” – identities and categories around race, class, gender, and sexuality have been called into question. So, who are we? And how do we know who we are? Although the answers to these questions may seem personal and inherent, in this course, we will explore these questions through a sociological lens. We will examine how the self is produced by society and what the relation is between the self and society. Essentially, this course will tackle how our identities are socially produced and how the social production of identities is bound up with power, privilege, and oppression. The beginning of the course will focus on general theories and concepts about identities, the self, and society. We will then consider the roles that race, gender, class, and sexuality play in understanding our identities. We will end the course by looking at more thematic areas around identities.

Required Texts & Readings

Mock, Janet. 2014. Redefining Realness: My Path to Womanhood, Identity, Love & So Much More. New York: Atria Books.

All other required readings will be posted on Canvas.

Course Grading

Short Paper                  10%

Reading Summaries      15% (5 total/3% each)

Midterm Exam              25%

Final Paper                  25%

Final Exam                   25%

 


SOC 308N • Compar Relig/Politics/Culture

44460 • Swed, Ori
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm CLA 1.106
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Description

The course Comparative Religion, Politics and Culture compares and contrasts three different countries’ political systems; each represents a different culture and religion using the historical comparative method of analysis. In this course we will examine the complex interplay between politics, local religion, and culture following the similarities and dissimilarities among the three case studies, U.S., Iran and Israel. The course addresses fundamental political and societal issues on the role of the state, religion, culture, and the distribution of power. The three case studies illustrate different approaches and solutions for political questions and the dispersal of power between the secular state and religious institutions. Each political system serves as a window to the local culture, ethos, history, and identity, and presenting idiosyncratic political, religious, and cultural model.

The course organized in five sections: Theory, US, Iran, Israel, and Integration. We will open with the theoretical framework that will guide us throughout the course and provide us with the conceptual toolkit for comparison and analyzing. The next three sections will focus on each case study and portray their history, political system, religious structure, and culture. In each the students will evaluate media reports for causality, validity and accuracy and analyze demographic data in the light of sociological theories. The last section, the integration, will juxtapose the three case studies and examine them with the theoretical toolkit we acquired. Here, the students will work both with empirical and theoretical models, appreciating their explanatory and predictive powers.

The course has two main goals. The first is to clarify the dynamics and relations between politics, religion, and culture and how this triangle influences day to day life in a given society. The second goal is to familiarize the students with the Israeli and Iranian culture from a different perspective than the one often presented by the media.

The course consists of readings with class discussion that confront theory with the case studies. Required and recommended readings are listed on canvas or can be accessed through the UT library services. The course grade will be based on two exams, four course assignments and class discussions. The midterm will focus on the theory section and the first case study and the final exam will cover the entire course material. The assignments are short essays, uploaded to the course’s blog, which requires analysis of theory with data. 

Grading Policy:

Participation – 30%

Blog Assignments (4 Assignments) – 10%

Mid-Term Exam (3/18)– 30%

Final Exam (5/3) – 30%

Grading

Letter grades will be assigned on the following scale:

A 94-100

A- 90-93

B+ 86-89

B 83-85

B- 80-82

C+ 76-79

C 73-75

C- 70-72

D+ 66-69

D 63-65

D- 60-62

F 0-59

 


SOC 308S • Intro To Health & Society

44465 • Osbakken, Stephanie
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm CAL 100
(also listed as H S 301)
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A broad, multidisciplinary overview that introduces students to the study of health and society.

Only one of the following may be counted: Health and Society 301, Sociology 308 (Topic: Introduction to Health and Society), 308S.

Same as SOC 308S.


SOC 310S • Wmns Reprod Hlth Nonsci Maj

44470 • Hopkins, Kristine
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm UTC 4.110
(also listed as WGS 301)
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Description 

To study women’s reproductive health is to study biology, chemistry, anatomy, physiology, endocrinology, female sexuality, and the social meaning of gender.  This course provides non-science majors with the scientific and social scientific knowledge needed to understand the basis of women’s reproductive health and the medical, cultural, and even political issues surrounding women’s reproductive health.  Students will learn about female reproductive health across the lifespan.  Students will also learn about some of the ways that social, economic, and cultural factors influence a woman’s reproductive health.


SOC 317L • Intro To Social Statistics

44475 • Powers, Daniel A.
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am PAR 303
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Description:

This is an introductory course in statistics for undergraduate majors in sociology.  The basics of descriptive and inferential statistics and quantitative reasoning will be covered.  Descriptive statistics involves organizing and summarizing important characteristics of the data.  Statistical inference involves making informed guesses about the unknown characteristics of a population based on the known characteristics of a sample. Students are expected to know how to carryout elementary mathematical operations.

Required Text:

R. Johnson and P. Kuby (2012) STAT, 2e. Cengage Learning ISBN-10: 0538733500  ISBN-13: 978-0-538-73841-5  (available from http://books.google.com)

Course Requirement:

Exams: There will be 3 in-class examinations graded on a 100 point scale.  Roughly 75% to 90% of the points on the examinations are accounted for by problems requiring the student to work toward a solution, with the remainder accounted for by true and false or multiple choice questions.  Examinations will be based entirely on topics covered in lectures. In-class examinations are non-cumulative; they cover only the material since the previous exam. Students must take all exams to pass the course. Make up exams will be given only in the case of documented emergencies or illness.

Problems: There will be 5 problem sets worth a total of 200 points. Problem sets include material from the book as well as handout problems. Problem sets must be received in class no later than the dates indicated. No credit will be given for assignments turned in late.

In-Class Assessments: There will be approximately 20 in-class exercises carried out at various points during the course to assess understanding of current topics. These will count 100 points towards the total grade.

 


SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

44480 • Angel, Ronald J.
Meets MW 900am-1000am CLA 0.118
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Course Description:

 

In this course we will investigate the methods used in social scientific research.  We will examine such issues as how one establishes causality and just what “proof” consists of in social scientific inquiry.  We will investigate the nature of data and examine the strengths and weaknesses of qualitative and quantitative data.  We will also deal with issues related to ethics and the uses to which social scientific research can legitimately be put.

 

The final project consists of a research proposal for a theoretical project on a topic you will choose in consultation with the Professor or the Teaching Assistant.  In it you will outline all relevant aspects of the project, including sampling and questionnaire construction, but you will not actually carry out the research itself.  In preparation for the final research proposal two preliminary papers are required.  In these you will (1) define the research question and (2) outline the research methods to be used to address it.   The course includes a lab in which material presented in class will be elaborated and in which computer applications will be discussed.  All course materials will be available on Blackboard.  Assignments, schedule changes, and announcements related to the course will appear on Blackboard and students are responsible for keeping informed.

 

The course includes three Internet assignments that involve answering a particular question using information you locate online.  These assignments will be related to the development of the final research proposal.

 

Course Requirements:

 

In the course we will do a good bit of data analysis with an eye toward understanding what numbers and graphs can tell us and what they cannot.  The required text is Earl Babbie, The Practice of Social Research, tenth edition or later, Thompson publishers.  Other readings are provided in the Readings file on Blackboard and will be assigned in class.  We will use the computer lab in CLA.  All of the software and manuals are available on line.  The Teaching Assistant is available to provide whatever help you need.

 

The final grade will be based on three equally weighted hourly exams (together 40% of the final grade), graded lab work (10% of the final grade) and two graded writing assignments, the first of which is a draft of the problem statement of the final research proposal (15% and 35% of the final grade).  To determine the final grade these weighted scores will be summed and the weighted total curved so that approximately 15% of the class receives an A, 15% A-, 15% B+, 15% B, 30% C, etc.  This is a required course and a C or higher is required for it to count toward the Sociology major.  Attendance at class and lab are mandatory and will be factored into the final grade.  Three unexcused absences will result in an automatic full letter grade drop in the final grade.  More than six unexcused absences will result in a failing grade.  All assignments must be turned in on the date they are due.  Late work will be accepted only with prior approval.  The lab sessions will be critical in developing the proposal.


SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

44485 • Pettit, Becky
Meets MW 1000am-1100am CLA 0.118
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Course Description

 In Sociology 317M, we will investigate questions central to the study of social life.  Using a hands-on approach, we will explore how to examine and communicate core sociological concepts, methods, and explanations.  Like historians, we will examine archival materials.  Like ethnographers, we will observe – and record – contemporary social life.  Like survey methodologists, we will design and implement a survey.  As in other sociology classes, you will be asked to analyze and interpret the evidence you collect.  This class requires you to make a commitment to using – and thinking about – the methods of social science research. 

 This course is designed to promote an experiential and interactive learning environment.  The course will involve a combination of lectures, lab/discussion sections, guided field study (i.e., field trips), and opportunities to apply and communicate learned concepts (i.e., assignments/field projects).   A significant amount of classroom time is reserved to introduce students to the methods of inquiry used by social scientists.  Students are required to practice sociological methods as part of the course.  No prior experience is necessary. 

 Course Materials

 Babbie, Earl.  The Practice of Social Research.  Belmont, CA:  Wadsworth Publishing. 

  • Any Edition after 9
  • I-Clicker
  • Additional readings will be available as links through the course webpage.

 Course Objectives

 When you have completed this course, you will be able to:

  • Articulate a theoretically-oriented research question
  • Identify ethical and unethical methodologies
  • Examine archival materials
  • Observe and record contemporary social life
  • Design and implement a survey
  • Analyze and interpret evidence
  • Evaluate the validity, reliability, and generalizability of different types of data and methods
  • Communicate core sociological concepts, methods, and explanations

SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

44490 • Angel, Ronald J.
Meets MW 1100am-1200pm CLA 0.118
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Course Description:

 

In this course we will investigate the methods used in social scientific research.  We will examine such issues as how one establishes causality and just what “proof” consists of in social scientific inquiry.  We will investigate the nature of data and examine the strengths and weaknesses of qualitative and quantitative data.  We will also deal with issues related to ethics and the uses to which social scientific research can legitimately be put.

 

The final project consists of a research proposal for a theoretical project on a topic you will choose in consultation with the Professor or the Teaching Assistant.  In it you will outline all relevant aspects of the project, including sampling and questionnaire construction, but you will not actually carry out the research itself.  In preparation for the final research proposal two preliminary papers are required.  In these you will (1) define the research question and (2) outline the research methods to be used to address it.   The course includes a lab in which material presented in class will be elaborated and in which computer applications will be discussed.  All course materials will be available on Blackboard.  Assignments, schedule changes, and announcements related to the course will appear on Blackboard and students are responsible for keeping informed.

 

The course includes three Internet assignments that involve answering a particular question using information you locate online.  These assignments will be related to the development of the final research proposal.

 

Course Requirements:

 

In the course we will do a good bit of data analysis with an eye toward understanding what numbers and graphs can tell us and what they cannot.  The required text is Earl Babbie, The Practice of Social Research, tenth edition or later, Thompson publishers.  Other readings are provided in the Readings file on Blackboard and will be assigned in class.  We will use the computer lab in CLA.  All of the software and manuals are available on line.  The Teaching Assistant is available to provide whatever help you need.

 

The final grade will be based on three equally weighted hourly exams (together 40% of the final grade), graded lab work (10% of the final grade) and two graded writing assignments, the first of which is a draft of the problem statement of the final research proposal (15% and 35% of the final grade).  To determine the final grade these weighted scores will be summed and the weighted total curved so that approximately 15% of the class receives an A, 15% A-, 15% B+, 15% B, 30% C, etc.  This is a required course and a C or higher is required for it to count toward the Sociology major.  Attendance at class and lab are mandatory and will be factored into the final grade.  Three unexcused absences will result in an automatic full letter grade drop in the final grade.  More than six unexcused absences will result in a failing grade.  All assignments must be turned in on the date they are due.  Late work will be accepted only with prior approval.  The lab sessions will be critical in developing the proposal.


SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

44495 • Osbakken, Stephanie
Meets TTH 1100am-1200pm CLA 0.118
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Course Description:

How do social scientists know what they know? This course strives to address that question by introducing students to the research methods used by sociologists to understand the world around them. The following are among the topics covered in this course: 1) How to link social theory with empirical inquiry; 2) How to identify the relative strengths and weaknesses of qualitative and quantitative approaches to social research; 3) How to critically understand and evaluate the claims made by social scientists about their research findings; 4) How to analyze, interpret, and present survey data; and 5) How to conceptualize and design a research project. The course will also cover the ethics and politics of conducting social research. Additionally, there will be a lab component to this course, which will take a “hands on” approach to the material covered in class and provide students with the necessary skills to analyze survey data.

Required Readings:

 

In addition to articles and readings that will be provided on the course website, we will use the following textbook:

Babbie, Earl. 2013. The Practice of Social Research (13th Edition). Wadsworth, Cengage Learning.

Course Grading:

Grades for the course will be based on two exams (exam 1 = 20%, exam 2 = 20%), an analysis paper (15%), a research proposal (20%), a class presentation (5%), lab assignments (15%), and class participation (5%).

Attendance in class and at the lab is required and will be factored into the class participation component of the grade. Make-up exams will not be allowed, except in extreme circumstances. Late assignments will only be accepted if approved in advance by the professor.

 


SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

44500 • Pedulla, David
Meets TTH 1230pm-130pm CLA 0.118
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Description:

How do sociologists understand and study the world around them?  This course introduces students to the ways in which social scientists pose and answer questions.   First, this course begins by considering how knowledge production is situated within a specific historical and cultural context and is shaped by power relations within society.   Some questions are simply easier—politically, logistically, legally—to ask and answer.  Other questions are difficult to broach or effectively investigate, and are sometimes fraught with ethical concerns.  We will also explore how theory is linked to empirical discovery, which in turn, tests, builds, and/or refines theoretical understandings of the social world.  Students will examine the process of social research by 1) considering the research questions that social scientists routinely ask, 2) examining the methodological approaches social scientists use to answer their research questions, 3) analyzing the claims authors make in existing research studies, and 4) investigating the ethical issues that shape the context of inquiry and the process of social research.  This course adopts a hands-on approach to research methods.  As such, students will be expected to collect and analyze data in labs as well as outside of class.

 

Readings: 

Textbook TBA, other readings to be posted to Canvas


SOC 318 • Juvenile Delinquency

44505 • Osborne, Lynette
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm CLA 0.126
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COURSE DESCRIPTION 

In this course, we will engage in an analysis of historical, economic, and social conditions affecting both difficulties in socializing youth and the evolution of the state's formal systems of control.  We will also learn about current issues in youth and delinquency as well as programs designed to aid in deterrence and rehabilitation of youth.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

At the end of this course, students will be able to

  • Describe historical trends in delinquency
  • Identify and describe current trends in youth and delinquency
  • Use sociological theories of deviance to analyze trends
  • Identify and interpret data from government sources
  • Analyze scholarly research on delinquency

SOC 319 • Intro To Social Demography

44510 • Paredes, Cristian
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CLA 0.128
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Description

This course is designed to provide an introduction to demography by focusing on the following questions: What are the major components of population change? How are populations structured? What theoretical perspectives guide the scientific study of population?  What data are used to study population changes? What are some of the key methods used to analyze population change and structure? What are major causes and consequences of population change? How are policies created to better help societies deal with population change?  Moreover, this course aims to provide students with some basic skills in demographic analysis (the mathematics used in this course are not difficult/advanced). 


SOC 321G • Global Health Issues/Systems

44515 • Jeon, Jiwon
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CLA 0.118
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Course Description

This course provides an overview of global health challenges in the world today. It is essential to understand the links between health and education, poverty, and development with an appreciation of the values, beliefs, and cultures of diverse groups. The first half of the course will review critical global health issues from biosocial, cultural and environmental perspectives. A biosocial approach to global health equity is the underlying theme. The second half of the course will review various health systems in the World Health Organization geographic regions and will compare and contrast the various regions, as well as countries within regions, with regard to the specific health challenges they face.

This course carries both the Writing flag and Global Cultures flag. We will use writing to improve on critical thinking skills and understanding of global health issues as well as to improve on ability to formulate ideas with an emphasis on the ASA writing style.  In this class, you can expect to write regularly during the semester, complete substantial writing projects, and receive feedback from your instructor to help you improve your writing. You will also have the opportunity to revise one or more assignments, and you may be asked to read and discuss your peers’ work. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from writing assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group. This course may be used to fulfill the social and behavioral sciences component of the university core curriculum and addresses the following four core objectives established by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board: communication skills, critical thinking skills, empirical and quantitative skills, and social responsibility.  


Course Objectives

  1. Describe global health issues, trends, and policies
  2. Understand how population growth, disease, environmental changes, and economic and political activities impact global health
  3. Assess and analyze global health program interventions and their impacts
  4. Compare and contrast health issues and policies between economically developed countries and developing countries
  5. Synthesize findings to highlight common patterns and unique differences in health challenges between and within major world regions

Required Text and Readings

Farmer, Paul, J.Y. Kim, A. Kleinman and M. Basilico. 2013. Reimagining Global Health: An Introduction, University of California Press.

Skolnik, Richard. 2011. Global Health 101. Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett Publishers.

Additional Readings: In addition to above textbooks, other course materials including additional readings will be posted on Canvas each week.  Readings should be completed for the week they are assigned.

Recommended readings

Kidder, Tracy. 2009. Mountains Beyond Mountains: The quest of Dr. Paul Farmer, A man who would cure the world, Random House

Reid, T.R. 2010. The Healing of America, Penguin Books

Recommended resources (for writing)

https://owl.elglish.purdue.edu/owl/resources/583/1

www.asanet.org/student/quickstyle guide.pdf

Course requirements

There are two major paper assignments and two exams. The assignments are due at the beginning of the class and must be turned in as hard copies.  Please do not submit papers as e-mail attachments. Late papers will be marked down one letter grade for each day past the deadline. Papers more than one week late will not be accepted.

  • Assignment 1: Individual paper (30%)

Each student is required to write a research paper (5-6 pages) about global health issues. This assignment should allow the student to examine the rise and fall of global health issues with a more critical view.  There will be peer reviews as well as instructor comments on this assignment.  You will submit a memo detailing your revision with the final draft.  Detailed instructions and criteria for evaluation will be posted on Canvas.

  • Peer review (5%)
  • Paper (25%)

                                       

  • Assignment 2: Group project paper & presentation (25%)

Students are required to form a group to prepare a short presentation at the end of the semester and to write a research paper (not more than 10 pages). Students should work together as a team to analyze the political, social and economic determinants of health and analyze how delivery systems for preventive and curative health services might be strengthened in developing countries. Group members will conduct an evaluation of their fellow group members for the final project and presentation. Detailed instructions and criteria for the group project and criteria for evaluation will be posted on Canvas.

  • Paper (10%)
  • Presentation (10%)
  • Peer evaluation (5%)

 Two Exams (20%)

    • Exam 1 (10%)
    • Exam 2 (10%)

 Class participation (25%)

There will be small group discussions during class and each student will submit a short written summary report.  Each member will be encouraged to participate and contribute substantially to small group discussions.

  • Discussion group summary (15%)
  • Class participation: contribution during class discussions (10%)

 


SOC 321K • Building The Sustainable City

44520 • Swearingen, Scott
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm ETC 2.102
(also listed as URB 352)
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Description

Building the Sustainable City is an interdisciplinary course that examines why we have to create  more sustainable living environments, what we are presently doing to rebuild American cities in more sustainable ways, and where we need to go in the future.  The course adopts the strong definition of sustainability to include the connections between economy, equity, and environment.   80% of the population lives in urban areas today, the vast majority of economic activity occurs in them, and most environmental problems are related to urbanization and industrialization.  Understanding how to build a sustainable city, then, is the key to building a sustainable society.  This course will focus on energy use, transportation policy, housing, and food production/distribution in the city.  Social equity issues will be integrated into all four themes, as all four are both cause and effect of social inequalities. 

The course links our academic understanding of sustainability with “real world”, on-the-ground people doing sustainability today.  It will feature several people working in city government, the non-profit sector, and academic positions as guest speakers.  These speakers will discuss their organizations as examples of how to build a sustainable city, and show students how they are building a more sustainable future here in Austin.  

Required Texts

Girardet, Herbert; "Cities, People, Planet."  Wiley and Sons, 2008.

Grading Policy

There will be 3 essays of 4-5 pages, typed, double spaced, and one group design project where student team design and "build" a sustainable city (this is a poster project which can be displayed on the wall, but those with technical expertise are welcome to mount it on a web platform).  Each essay will be 25% of the course grade, and the design project will be the final 25% of grade.

 


SOC 321K • Effective Philanthropy

44525 • Paxton, Pamela
Meets MW 400pm-530pm GDC 2.502
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Description

Effective philanthropy requires understanding the nonprofit sector as well as individual motivations to give and volunteer. At the same time, nonprofits need fundraising professionals to meet their financial goals. Effective Philanthropy: Fundraising and Nonprofit Advancement is designed to meet both goals by introducing students to theories of the nonprofit sector and individual prosocial behaviors like giving and volunteering, while also introducing the components of a successful development program and basic principles and techniques of fundraising. Students will learn theories and research on the nonprofit sector and prosocial motivations and behavior from Professor Pamela Paxton. Simultaneously, students will receive practical instruction from Adrian Matthys and other fundraising professionals in the local nonprofit community on all aspects of effective fundraising and stewardship, from building a solid base of annual contributors to cultivating relationships with major gift prospects. Attention will also be given to behind-the-scenes activities required to have a successful fundraising operation, including appropriate donor stewardship, prospect research, database maintenance, and donor analytics. Students will be exposed to the best practices of fundraising teams at all levels. The course will further provide students with unique hands-on experience raising money, with the assistance of professional fundraising from the UT Austin Office of Development, to be given away to charities through the paired Philanthropy: The Power of Giving course.

Note:  Professor consent required.

 


SOC 321K • Food And Society

44531 • Fulton, Kelly
Meets TTH 930am-1100am CLA 0.118
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Descriptons 

In this course we will explore the social context of food. Topics will include food and identity, social class and culture.  We will also investigate who plans, purchases, and prepares food for our families, including discussion of the recent debates about the value of a home-cooked meal.  We will take a tour through the alphabet soup of government assistance for the hungry, including SNAP, WIC and NSLP.  Finally, we examine food production and policies in the US. 

 This course carries the Writing Flag. Writing Flag courses are designed to give students experience with writing in an academic discipline. In this class, you can expect to write regularly during the semester, complete substantial writing projects, and receive feedback from your instructor to help you improve your writing. You will also have the opportunity to revise one or more assignments, and you may be asked to read and discuss your peers’ work. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from your written work. Writing Flag classes meet the Core Communications objectives of Critical Thinking, Communication, Teamwork, and Personal Responsibility, established by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

Readings will include:

Nestle, Marion. 201313.  Food Politics: How the Food Industry Influences Nutrition and Health

 

Pilcher, Jeffrey.  2012.  Planet Taco: A Global History of Mexican Food

 Pollan,  Michael.  2006.  The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals.

 


SOC 321K • Reproductive Justice & Race

44535 • Rudrappa, Sharmila
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am CLA 0.122
(also listed as AAS 330, WGS 340)
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Description:

Since the Cairo Conference on Population and Development in 1994 state policies concerning women’s health around the world have taken a turn away from population control to reproductive health. Within this context, activists and scholars alike have turned their attention to reproductive justice that envisions the complete physical and mental well-being of women and girls, which can potentially be achieved when they have the economic, social, and political power and resources to make healthy decisions about their bodies, sexuality, and reproduction. In this class we ask: how do various social movements define reproductive justice? How is access to reproductive rights stratified by race and class? Through drawing students’ attention to specific case studies, this course illuminates on the specific challenges faced by women of color in the U.S., as well as women in developing countries across the world. Topics we will cover are forcible sterilization, access (or lack of access) to birth control, population control policies, prenatal and postnatal care, maternal and infant health outcomes in various parts of the world, sex selective abortions, new reproductive technologies, and stratified reproduction. As part of the final part of the course the students will think through the reproductive health issues facing women of color on campus, through conducting a survey. 


SOC 321K • US Immigration

44540 • Rodríguez, Néstor P.
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm CLA 1.106
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Description

Immigration patterns have significantly affected the development of U.S. society since its inception.  In the 1990s, the United States experienced a record number of new immigrants admitted into the country, and the last decade (2000-2009) recorded even a larger number of immigrants admitted.  This course uses a sociological perspective to address various impacts of immigration in U.S. society.

Course Aims and Objectives

Aims

 This course is designed to provide a sociological understanding concerning the nature of immigration in U.S. society, including an understanding of how immigration affects large (macro) and small (micro) social units in the society.

Specific Learning Objectives

  • Gain background information on the development of immigration patterns in U.S. society and discuss the social forces that affect these patterns from the perspective of historical and recent immigration trends.
  •  Review and discuss different perceptions about immigration patterns.
  •  Review and analyze government statistical reports concerning annual immigration conditions and characteristics.
  • Develop an awareness of the significance of immigration for the development of U.S. society.

 Review major laws affecting migration patterns to U.S. society

Grading

a) Three regular exams (40 multiple-choice items and a take-home essay question for each):

100 points per exam x 3 regular exams = 300 points

b) Total possible points = 300

 

 


SOC 322C • Sociology Of Creativity

44550 • Haghshenas, Hossein
Meets MW 300pm-430pm CLA 0.118
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Description

This course will introduce the students to different aspects of creative insights, human consciousness, social processes, and the ‘invention of reality’.  The class will bring the intellectual abilities and intuitive inclinations together as a complementary process. We’ll pursue and encourage elements of mindfulness, intuition, and creativity at the individual, organizational, societal, and environmental levels.  The course will draw upon a wide range of sources- lectures, group discussions, books, articles, artistic films, documentaries–in order to better understand and appreciate the interconnectedness and interrelationship between ‘inner’ (personal) and the other (‘social’) reality. The media will be presented as technical methods of representation of "social reality" and socio-cultural phenomena. No technical aspects will be emphasized.

Required Texts

A selection of articles will be, prepared in a packet.

Michael Schwalbe. 2007. The Sociologically Examined Life: Pieces of the Conversation.

Otis Carney. 2002. Wars R’ Us: Taking Action for Peace.

Paulo Coelho. 1995. The Alchemist: A Fable About Following Your Dream   

Joseph Campbell. 2004. Pathways to Bliss: Mythological and Personal  Transformation                                   

Mitch Albon. Tuesday with Morrie.

 Grading Policy             

20%  Short essays / Journal entries

20% Group Workshops and class participation

10%  Written Critiques of student paper

10% Oral Presentation

10% Final assessment

30% Final course project


SOC 322E • Entrepreneurship & Innovation

44560 • Butler, John S.
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm CBA 4.344
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Course Description:

 

Entrepreneurship and innovation are the principal source of jobs and wealth in market economies. This course is concern with entrepreneurship, with a special emphasis on technology transfer and wealth creation. Technology transfer is the process of taking innovations out of laboratories and findingcommercial applications for those technologies. Although we will look at all kinds of entrepreneurship, the focus of the group project is on technology transfer and new venture development. The course is also concern with explaining “how” entrepreneurship takes place as well as “why” it takes place. The “how” of new venture development is related to the entrepreneurial process (innovation, technology transfer assessment, business plans, fund raising, launching of the enterprise, and the harvest or selling of the enterprise)? Research in this area is rich, comes out of the discipline of Management and, tends to concentrate on case studies and best practices. The “why” of entrepreneurship is concerned with why people and groups of people engage in the entrepreneurial process? Research in the area is found in the disciplines of History, Sociology, Psychology and Economics, and is less concerned with case studies but instead concentrates on statistical analysis of measured variables of individuals and groups of individuals. The course brings together both the Business side of entrepreneurship research and the Liberal Arts side of new venture development. The course thus concentrates on the entrepreneurial process as well as the history (elements from the ancient world) and theoretical aspects of new venture developments.

Readings:

Reading range from the development of high tech firms (remember that high tech is everything from the discovery of fire, automobiles and airplanes) to the entrepreneurial lessons of American immigrants. The course also utilizes “live” case studies; these are individuals who have created wealth and will share their knowledge with the class. The overall aim of the course is to create within you the idea that someone has to concentrate on wealth creation and job creation within the context of market economies. You will be guided with a tool that is called “Quicklook,” which is designed to analyze a new technologies market potential. You will have an opportunity to create your “BIG IDEA” with your classmates as team members. The final project is for the teams to present their “BIG IDEA” to the class.

Grading:

Two essay examinations 80%

A final group project that is based on an innovative idea 15%

Every student will fill out an evaluation of the presentation presented by fellow students. 5%

 

 


SOC 322M • Sociology Of Masculinities

44565 • González-López, Gloria
Meets MW 500pm-630pm CLA 0.118
(also listed as WGS 322)
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DESCRIPTION:

Why do we study men and masculinity? Isn’t traditional academic knowledge male biased, anyway? Yes, most scholarship has been androcentric but women’s studies intellectuals have facilitated the emergence of a critical analysis and study of men as men. This course is devoted to a sociological examination of the most important debates and discussions about men’s experiences of masculinity in contemporary patriarchal societies. In this course, we will examine social and individual meanings of masculinity, the dominant paradigms of masculinity that we take as the norm, and the problems, contradictions and paradoxes men experience in modern society. We will examine these themes while looking at the social and cultural dynamics shaped by class, race/ethncity, sexuality, age, and culture in a variety of social contexts and arrangements. Although we will study men representing the diverse cultural groups in the United States, we will pay special attention to the experiences of African American and Latino men. We will examine the privileges as well as the costs of rigid expressions of masculinity. In our discussions we will explore avenues for social justice and change.

REQUIRED TEXTS:     

Kimmel & Messner, Men’s Lives, 7th. Edition, Allyn and Bacon

Additional readings are available in Blackboard (Bb) and the UT Library System

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

(1) Class participation and attendance 10%

Students are responsible for the following: a) attending all class meetings; b) completing reading assignments on time; and c) participating in small group exercises, and class discussions and assignments.  I will run this class in a way that is similar to graduate seminars.  Therefore, I will deliver a lecture and we will spend a good deal of time discussing the assigned reading.  You are required to analyze materials and lectures as you develop your own critical thinking and views of men’s lives, culture and society.   

(2) Exams 60%

The Exam # 1 (30%) and Exam # 2 (30%) will consist of both multiple choice and short essay questions.  The exams will include all assigned readings, lectures and guest lectures, and any film or video clips covered in class.  The student must obtain the  professor’s permission one week in advance if she/he is not able to attend class on the day of the exam. She/he will then be assigned an alternate day and time to take the exam. Excuses for missing an exam will not be accepted unless the student offers a physician statement or other valid documentation as required by university policies and regulations.  

(3) Final Paper 30%

 


SOC 323 • The Family

44570 • Palmo, Nina
Meets TTH 930am-1100am CLA 1.102
(also listed as WGS 345)
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Description:

This course explores the family as a social institution in American society. The primary goal of this class is to encourage students to step beyond their personal experiences and cultivate a more sociological and analytical approach to the family.  By the end of the term, students will be able understand the cultural and structural forces that shape family life, and how these dimensions can shift, but also resist change over time. We will begin with a historical overview of the family where we will contextualize and challenge nostalgic depictions of the family in popular culture.  Throughout the term we will chart multiple dimensions of family life, including dating, cohabitation, marriage, parenting, childhood, and divorce, and changing ideas of the American family, to name a few.  We will adopt a sociological perspective, considering how gender, race, class, sexuality, and other social factors shape family relationships and family life.  We will also consider alternate family structures that were once dismissed as deviant (e.g. having children outside marriage and gay marriage) but are increasingly common and continue to shape public policy in the 21st century.  This course carries a writing flag designation and so also seeks to develop students’ writing skills throughout the term.

Texts:                         

TBA

Grades:           

Two Papers 45%

Journal Writing Assignments  20%

Peer Reviews   5%

Attendance and Participation  20%

Group Presentation on a topic about the Family 10%

                        


SOC 323D • Border Control/Deaths

44575 • Rodríguez, Néstor P.
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm WAG 214
(also listed as MAS 374)
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Course Rationale

Since the 1940s, US control of the Southwest border has remained a major challenge in immigration policy. Border control has become one of the most debated topics in Congress, and now even in state legislatures in border areas. Annually thousands of unauthorized migrants cross the US-Mexico border into the United States to participate in US labor markets and in other social arenas. A consequence of unauthorized immigration, and of the implementation of border control measures for deterrence, has been the deaths of hundreds of migrants annually. The social effects of border control and the occurrence of migrant deaths have become sociological topics investigated by sociologists and other researchers to increase our knowledge and understanding of the full nature of international labor migration.

Course Aims and Objectives

Aims

This course is designed to provide a sociological understanding of border control and migrant deaths at the US-Mexico border. Of particular importance for the course is research knowledge concerning border control policies and patterns of migrant deaths.

Specific Learning Objectives

  • Gain information and understanding of the development and effects of US border control policies concerning the following: border control campaigns, social and public perceptions of the border, migrant death patterns in border areas, government plans to redirect migration, ethics of border control, human rights and critical perspectives related to migrant deaths, bureaucratic ideology in border control, migrant death forensics, smuggling, community responses to migrant deaths, recent research on border control and migrant deaths.
  • Review and discuss different approaches and measures for border control.
  •  Review and analyze government statistical reports concerning annual migrant apprehensions at the border and annual counts of migrant deaths in border sectors.
  • Develop an awareness of the significance of border control for the development of US immigration policy.
  •  Review major impacts of US border control measures for local communities.

Grading

 a) Three regular exams. Each exam will have 40 multiple-choice items (worth 80 points) and a take-home essay (worth 20 points):

100 points per exam x 3 regular exams = 300 points

b) Total possible points = 300 without writing a journal article review

   Total possible points = 300 to 310 if you write a journal article review

 


SOC 323M • Sport And English Society-Gbr

44580 • Carrington, Ben
Meets
(also listed as EUS 346)
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Description:

Sport occupies a significant place within English society; from the centrality of cricket in helping to shape the British empire, to the importance of soccer (“football”) in promoting the varied national identities within the UK and Northern Ireland, to the ways in which women and racial minorities have used sport to achieve social mobility and recognition, sport remains one of the most important ways to understand the changing nature of English society in the 21st century.  The course is located in Leeds, a diverse metropolis, known for its culture and sporting teams. Given this unique location, the Maymester enables students to explore the internal divisions around class and region that are central to understanding English identity, particularly the tensions between “the north” and “the south”, as well as discover the origins of American football and baseball.

Assessment criteria:

40% - Three page critical summary of each field trip (each summary will be worth 10% of final grade).

60% - Final synoptic ten to twelve page essay drawing on the lectures, field trips and readings – essay title to be agreed with Professor Ben Carrington.

Required reading: Course pack

 


SOC 325K • Criminology

44585 • Warr, E. Mark
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm CLA 0.102
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UPPER-DIVISION STANDING REQUIRED. COMPLETION OF SIX SEMESTER HOURS OF SOCIOLOGY.

Course Description

An investigation into the nature of criminal events including, homicide, rape, robbery, property crimes and white-collar crimes. Also examines the US criminal justice system.

Grading Policy

Three tests (no final) Occasional quizzes

Texts

Mark Warr, Companions in Crime, Cambridge University Press


SOC 325K • Criminology

44590 • Warr, E. Mark
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CLA 0.102
show description

UPPER-DIVISION STANDING REQUIRED. COMPLETION OF SIX SEMESTER HOURS OF SOCIOLOGY.

Course Description

An investigation into the nature of criminal events including, homicide, rape, robbery, property crimes and white-collar crimes. Also examines the US criminal justice system.

Grading Policy

Three tests (no final) Occasional quizzes

Texts

Mark Warr, Companions in Crime, Cambridge University Press


SOC 325L • Soc Of Criminal Justice

44595 • Kelly, William R
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm CLA 0.128
(also listed as URB 354)
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Description

This course is in two parts.  The first will provide an introduction to the American criminal justice system, its policies and procedures.  The primary focus will be on how criminal justice operates.  This will include some discussion of crime and its correlates, crime prevention, law enforcement, courts and corrections.  The second part traces where criminal justice policy has been, what it has accomplished, and where it should go in order to effectively reduce crime, recidivism, victimization and cost.  The primary focus of where do we go from here is on prosecution, sentencing and corrections.

The class periods will be devoted to lectures and discussion. We may have guest speakers and probably a video or two.  The lecture material will sometimes correspond very closely with the material in the texts and sometimes it will not.  I encourage class discussions and questions and hope that the material will be sufficiently interesting and controversial to motivate discussion.

Texts

Experiencing Criminal Justice by Nicole Hendrix

Criminal Justice at the Crossroads; Transforming Crime and Punishment by William Kelly

Grading and Requirements

There will be four exams.  The first two are multiple choice/true false.  The second two are multiple choice and short answer.  Each exam constitutes 25% of the course grade.  The exams will cover all of the material - assigned readings, lectures, guest speakers and videos.

 


SOC 330P • Sociology & Social Psychology

44605 • Rose, Mary
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CLA 0.112
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Course Description

This course is designed to give you a broad introduction to the field of social psychology, a topic that is investigated in both psychology and sociology departments. I have three aims for the course: (1) I want to provide you with an overview of the field of social psychology; (2) I want to introduce you to the various research methodologies that social psychologists use to investigate a phenomenon empirically; and (3) I want you to be able to spot applications to the “real world” of the material we discuss. Students enrolled in this course should have upper division standing, and, ideally, they should have taken courses in either sociology or psychology. This course is not cross-listed with psychology, which means that it does not count towards the requirements for a degree in psychology (but of course you still get credit for it as an upper-division sociology course). 

Even in a class of this size, I will occasionally call on people and ask them to give me their understanding of a topic we are discussing. Although I do not restrict lecture topics to what appears in the text, the most effective discussions – and the way for you to get the most out of this class in general – is to do your readings prior to the class for which they are assigned. This will help you immensely with lectures and ultimately with the tests. 

Texts

John D. DeLamater, & Daniel J. Myers, Social Psychology (7th edition). Thompson/Wadsworth (2010). [PLEASE NOTE: This version of the book is a restructured one; do not rely solely on older editions without a close comparison to the 7th] 

Grading

Final grades are based on three exams, in-class exercises, and a brief writing assignment. 


SOC 336P • Social Psychology And The Law

44610 • Rose, Mary
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm JGB 2.216
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Description:

Crimes, trials, evidence, juries, sentences, lawsuits – you hear a lot about issues with which the legal system concerns itself. But people in the legal system are not the only ones who consider these issues. This course will look at courts, legal actors, and legal policies through the lens of social science, especially social psychology.  The goal of the course will be to learn about existing research on law-related topics.  A sample of areas to be covered include: predicting dangerousness, eyewitness testimony, mental health issues in the law (such as competence to stand trial and the insanity defense), children in the law, and jury decision-making on verdicts in criminal and civil cases.  Students enrolling must have taken at least one introductory sociology or psychology course.

Texts:

This course has one required textbook (Greene & Heilbrun, “Wrightsman’s Psychology and the Legal System”); attendance is not mandatory but is gauged through for-credit activities that occur during some class sessions. This course has an “Ethics and Leadership” Flag. 


SOC 352D • Boundaries & Dilemmas: Honors

44620 • Ekland-Olson, Sheldon
Meets TTH 800am-930am CLA 0.120
(also listed as LAH 350)
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Description:

This is a advanced research course designed to explore policy issues linked to universal moral imperatives, violation of these imperatives, and perhaps most interestingly how we justify such violation. The objective is to help students develop research skills in a topic of significant policy importance.  In some ways, this course is an advanced, research oriented follow-up to Life and Death Decisions, offered at the lower division.  This lower division course, while helpful, is not a prerequisite.

 

Two imperatives will be chosen for attention:

1)           Life is sacred and should be protected.

2)           Suffering, once detected should be alleviated.

 

The class will be spent exploring how exclusionary boundaries and moral dilemmas play a central role in the justification of violations.

 

As time permits, five specific topics will be explored:

1)           Eugenics and mandated sterilization

2)           Abortion

3)            Neonatal care

4)           Euthanasia and Physician Assisted Suicide

5)           War

 

The class will be spent exploring how exclusionary boundaries and moral dilemmas play a central role in collective justification  of violations of these universal imperatives.  Attention will focus on the important role a sense of injustice and implied assessments of legitimacy play in guiding social change.  Finally, we will focus on how scientific knowledge and associated technological advances stimulate the evolution of moral systems.

 

Required Texts:

There is no assigned text.  Readings from numerous sources such as Edmond Cahn's  The Sense of Injustice; Edwin Black's War Against the Weak; Helga Kuhe and Peter Singer's Should the Baby Live?; and Wesley Smith's Culture of Death.  Will be assigned.

 

Grading Policy:

The class will be broken into smaller groups.  Each group will choose (or be given) a specific topic, such as physician assisted suicide, neonatal care, or war. As a group you will be asked to develop a set of ideas consistent with the general framework developed in the early sessions of class.  Individually, you will be asked to write a 16-20 page paper on your chosen topic. This paper will be handed in for initial grading and editorial comment. Your grade on the initial draft will constitute 40% of your grade. The paper will be handed back to you for revision. You will be asked to hand in the revised version at the end of class. This final version of the paper will be graded and will also constitute 40% of your grade.

 

The remaining 20% of your grade will come from class participation. In addition to in-class discussions, throughout the semester you will be discuss, via Discussion Board, various assigned topics throughout the semester.

 


SOC 354K • Sociology Of Health & Illness

44625 • Jeon, Jiwon
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm CLA 1.106
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Course Description

This course provides an introduction to central topics in the sociology of health and illness. The material covered in this course will encompass individual, institutional and theoretical approaches to health & illness.  The course is designed to provide a critical framework for exploring how social, political, economic and cultural forces shape the understanding and experience of health and illness.  We will explore the following themes: 1) the social production and distribution of disease and illness; 2) the meaning and experience of illness; 3) the social organization of medical care; 4) health politics and health systems.

Course Objectives

At the completion of this course, the student will learn and understand:

  1. how the concepts of health and illness are socially constructed
  2. how social, political and economic factors shape an individual’s experience of health and illness
  3. the major methods and theories used to understand the distribution of health and illness in society
  4. the structure and organization of the health care system and the construction of medical knowledge from a critical perspective

Required Text and Readings

Conrad, Peter & Valerie Leiter. 2013.  The Sociology of Health and Illness: Critical Perspectives (9th Ed.) Worth Publishers (ISBN-10: 1-4292-5527-7).

Additional readings:  In addition to above textbooks, other course materials including additional readings will be posted to Blackboard each week.  Readings should be completed for the week they are assigned.

Course requirements

Your grade will be determined by three criteria:

1) Three exams 75%

2) assignment: short paper 15%

3) class participation 10%

Exams: three in-class exams (75%)

 There will be three in-class exams worth 75 points each.  The in-class exams will cover the readings and lecture materials covered prior to that exam. The format of the in-class exams will be multiple-choice, true and false, and short/medium-answer questions. Missed exams will be counted as zero unless arrangements are made in advance.  Make-up exams will be given only if a physician’s note or other verifiable document is provided.

Assignment: short paper (15%)

 Each student is required to write a paper no more than 5 double-spaced pages in length involving a sociological perspective of health, illness and health care.  Papers must be presented in ASA format and be based upon a review of the appropriate literature.  The information and guidelines for the assignment will be posted on Blackboard.

 The paper assignment is due by the beginning of class.  Late paper grades will be deducted 10% each day beyond the due date, and papers more than one week late will not be accepted.  In such an incidence, a grade of zero will be given and factored into the final grade.

 Class participation: In-class discussions and quizzes (10%)

The in-class components will be measured by pop quizzes and class participation.  There will be several pop quizzes given periodically at the instructor’s discretion, based on weekly readings, class discussions, and films shown during class.  In addition, students will engage in short discussions or working sessions as a group during class and will submit a written report.  This report will include the discussion results and the names of students who participated in the discussion sessions.  There will be NO in-class make-up quizzes and discussion reports regardless of the reasons for absence.

 Attendance and Participation Policy

 Attendance: Class attendance will not be formally taken. However, participation in class discussions will be a proxy for attendance and this may influence your final grade. You are allowed three non-penalized absences during the semester.  Students who miss more than three classes, regardless of the reason, will have their semester grade reduced by one grade. In the event of absence, you will be responsible for all information presented in class.

Student conduct: Every student will be actively involved in classroom discussions.  In order for everyone to feel comfortable voicing opinions or asking questions, a climate of tolerance and respect is essential. 

 Use of laptops in class for taking notes: Use of laptops in class is allowed for taking notes only.  Other uses—like surfing the web or checking email—can be a distraction to those around you and are not permitted.

 


SOC 366 • Deviance

44630 • Osborne, Lynette
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm WEL 4.224
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Course Description

This course examines deviant behavior in the US.  The course begins by defining different types of deviance (negative and positive).  Discussions of types of deviance, how/why we define certain activities as deviant, how deviance changes over time, and how we understand deviant behavior through theories will be the main focus of the course. Empirical, peer reviewed journal articles will be used to learn about current deviance research findings.  Theory articles will be used to demonstrate core theories and how they can be used to understand and predict behavior.

Learning Objectives

By the end of a successfully completed term, students will be able to:

  • define deviance and understand the difference between positive and negative deviance;
  • explain how ideas about what counts as deviance changes over time and how these changes are reflected in society;
  • discuss current research on deviance in the US; 
  • explain and apply various theoretical approaches to deviant behavior.

Additional Objectives

This course is also designed to teach and/or improve the following skills:

  • critical thinking
  • professional/academic writing
  • comprehension of challenging material

Required Materials:                 

Articles:  required articles will be posted on Bb as .pdf or .doc attachments.

Films:  viewing several films is also required.  Titles are on the schedule.  You may find them online or order them from a source like Netflix or iTunes.

Grading:

In class participation  75 point

Reading Briefs           50 points

Journal Analysis         25 points

Three exams             50 points each

Project                     100 points

Grading scale

100-90 = A, 89-88 = B+, 87-80 = B, 79-78 = C+, 77-70 = C, 69-68 = D+, 67-60 = D, below 59 = F

As a general rule, I do not assign minuses (-).  If you earn an 80%, you get the B.  However, in circumstances when the grade is earned by rounding up, a minus will be assigned (e.g.:  79.9=B-).

 

 


SOC 369K • Population And Society

44635 • Cavanagh, Shannon E.
Meets TTH 930am-1100am CLA 0.102
(also listed as WGS 322)
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Description

Population studies or demography is an interdisciplinary field, encompassing the study of the size, distribution, and composition of human populations, and the processes of fertility, mortality, and migration through which populations’ change. These processes are closely connected to many of the pressing problems facing contemporary societies. For instance, the funding of health care in developed countries is a major issue because of declining fertility and population aging. Civil unrest in parts of Africa and the Middle East are, in part, a function of persistently high fertility rates. These processes are also important drivers of many contemporary environmental problems. Finally, a grasp of population processes is important for a deeper understanding of the population explosion in urban areas and the higher transmission and impact of AIDS in the developing world. 

This course provides an overview of the field of population studies. A sociological approach is emphasized, but economic, geographic, anthropological, and biological perspectives will also be used. Attention will be given to a) the demographic concepts needed to objectively evaluate population issues and b) the substantive content of the population issues. Emphasis will be given to evaluating the evidence regarding debates on population topics. 

Reading Materials 

Required text: Population: An Introduction to Concepts and Issues, 10th edition, John R. Weeks. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing Co. ISBN-10: 0495096377 

On-line Readings: There are a number of short reading assignments, marked with an [EL]. These readings can be found in External Links section of the class Blackboard site and should be read prior to class period. 

Grading and Requirement:

You are expected to complete all readings for the day's class before coming to class. Read as actively as possible. Class time will be an opportunity to discuss and further explore the readings, so it is essential that everyone comes prepared to participate. Our class periods will be more productive and enjoyable when we all begin with the same materials. 

There will be TWO examinations during the semester, each worth 20% of your final grade. The exams will draw from both readings and class discussions. The exams are not cumulative. Each will include multiple choice and short answer questions. Make-up examinations will not be administered except in extreme circumstances and only if I am notified beforehand. All make-up examinations are 100% essay. 

You must also complete TWO assignments and ONE short paper during the semester. The assignments—on mortality and fertility—are designed to familiarize you with demographic data on the web, give you an overview of your country of choice, and help you identify your country’s population angle that most interests you and that you will explore in more detail in the short paper. Each assignment is worth 15% of your final grade. The short paper is worth 25% of your grade. 

The final 5% of your grade is based on attendance/class participation. I expect you to show up and engage (i.e., not text, sleep, or read the newspaper) with classmates, the TA, and me in the class. 


SOC 679HA • Honors Tutorial Course

44640
Meets TH 330pm-430pm CLA 0.124
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Description:

This double-semester seminar was created after feedback from former Honors students and faculty supervisors.

The idea is to provide structure, instruction, and assistance throughout the duration of your thesis project, as well as to enable you to interact with and support one another.  Seminar participation should not increase your  workload, but the discussions and assignments will help you become more efficient in your research and writing.  Seminar format is a mixture of discussion, oral presentations, and guest speakers.  

Required Books:

 C. Wright Mills (1959) The Sociological Imagination. Oxford University Press.

Howard S. Becker (2007) Writing for Social Scientists. (2nd ed.) University of Chicago Press. Attendance Policy:

Regular attendance and active seminar participation are expected of all Honors students.  If you miss more than six (6) classes during the double-semester program, regardless of the reason for the absences, your 679HA grade will be reduced by one full percentage point for each absence beyond the six allowed.  This policy excludes absences for religious holidays, assuming advance, written notification is given. 

 Grading Policy:

First Semester:

1. An annotated bibliography comprised of 20 strong sources relevant to your thesis (20%) 2. A 6-7 page research proposal (20%) 3. A detailed outline of your research project by the end of the first semester (20%) 4. Quality of seminar participation (e.g., oral presentations, discussions, giving peer feedback) (40%)

Second Semester:

1. A well-written draft of a chapter of your thesis (20%) 2. Quality of seminar participation (e.g., oral presentations, class discussions, giving peer feedback) (60%) 3. Oral presentation of your thesis at the Sociology Honors Colloquium (20%) At the end of your first semester in Honors, you’ll be assigned an “incomplete.”  At the end of your second semester, after you’ve submitted your signed thesis to the Sociology Department, I’ll remove the incomplete and assign a grade for SOC 679HA, based on your two semesters of work and participation in the Honors Seminar. Your thesis supervisor will assign your grade for SOC 369HB, based on the quality of your thesis.


SOC 679HB • Honors Tutorial Course

44645
Meets TH 330pm-430pm CLA 0.124
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Description:

This double-semester seminar was created after feedback from former Honors students and faculty supervisors.

The idea is to provide structure, instruction, and assistance throughout the duration of your thesis project, as well as to enable you to interact with and support one another.  Seminar participation should not increase your  workload, but the discussions and assignments will help you become more efficient in your research and writing.  Seminar format is a mixture of discussion, oral presentations, and guest speakers.  

Required Books:

 C. Wright Mills (1959) The Sociological Imagination. Oxford University Press.

Howard S. Becker (2007) Writing for Social Scientists. (2nd ed.) University of Chicago Press. Attendance Policy:

Regular attendance and active seminar participation are expected of all Honors students.  If you miss more than six (6) classes during the double-semester program, regardless of the reason for the absences, your 679HA grade will be reduced by one full percentage point for each absence beyond the six allowed.  This policy excludes absences for religious holidays, assuming advance, written notification is given. 

 Grading Policy:

First Semester:

1. An annotated bibliography comprised of 20 strong sources relevant to your thesis (20%) 2. A 6-7 page research proposal (20%) 3. A detailed outline of your research project by the end of the first semester (20%) 4. Quality of seminar participation (e.g., oral presentations, discussions, giving peer feedback) (40%)

Second Semester:

1. A well-written draft of a chapter of your thesis (20%) 2. Quality of seminar participation (e.g., oral presentations, class discussions, giving peer feedback) (60%) 3. Oral presentation of your thesis at the Sociology Honors Colloquium (20%) At the end of your first semester in Honors, you’ll be assigned an “incomplete.”  At the end of your second semester, after you’ve submitted your signed thesis to the Sociology Department, I’ll remove the incomplete and assign a grade for SOC 679HA, based on your two semesters of work and participation in the Honors Seminar. Your thesis supervisor will assign your grade for SOC 369HB, based on the quality of your thesis.


SOC 379M • Sociological Theory

44650 • Fridman, Daniel
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CLA 1.106
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Description

The course introduces students to some of the main sociological theories and theorists since the late 19th century. The main focus of the class (about two thirds of the semester) will be on three classic authors: Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim, and Max Weber. In the last part of the semester, we will cover selected sociological theorists from the second half of the twentieth century, including Alfred Schutz, Erving Goffman, Pierre Bourdieu, Bruno Latour and Dorothy Smith. My goal is to introduce you to interesting and imaginative authors that took great pains to answer tough questions about society. Some readings will be more difficult than others, some will be more fun than others, and you will be more interested in some readings over others. But all of them will be worth your effort, as they will provide you with a solid grounding in the core theories that have informed sociological thinking since its beginnings. However, of course not everything about theory is reading; a great deal of your work will be thinking “theoretically”. I think that theories are a bit like play dough. They have a defined shape, but they can also be stretched, reshaped, and combined with other pieces. The final shape will not always satisfy you, but you can always start over. So, our goal will be to understand the theories by “playing” with them and relating them to what we usually call the “real world” (although ‘one’s world’ is not the same as the ‘real world’). Eventually, I hope you will discover how powerful and useful sociological theories can be to help you answer some of the toughest questions about societies.

Readings Most readings will be in a course packet, in addition to two or three books TBA.

Grading (tentative)

Exams (60%)

Paper (25%)

Class participation and forum posts (15%)


SOC 379M • Sociological Theory

44655 • Fridman, Daniel
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CLA 1.106
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Description

The course introduces students to some of the main sociological theories and theorists since the late 19th century. The main focus of the class (about two thirds of the semester) will be on three classic authors: Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim, and Max Weber. In the last part of the semester, we will cover selected sociological theorists from the second half of the twentieth century, including Alfred Schutz, Erving Goffman, Pierre Bourdieu, Bruno Latour and Dorothy Smith. My goal is to introduce you to interesting and imaginative authors that took great pains to answer tough questions about society. Some readings will be more difficult than others, some will be more fun than others, and you will be more interested in some readings over others. But all of them will be worth your effort, as they will provide you with a solid grounding in the core theories that have informed sociological thinking since its beginnings. However, of course not everything about theory is reading; a great deal of your work will be thinking “theoretically”. I think that theories are a bit like play dough. They have a defined shape, but they can also be stretched, reshaped, and combined with other pieces. The final shape will not always satisfy you, but you can always start over. So, our goal will be to understand the theories by “playing” with them and relating them to what we usually call the “real world” (although ‘one’s world’ is not the same as the ‘real world’). Eventually, I hope you will discover how powerful and useful sociological theories can be to help you answer some of the toughest questions about societies.

Readings Most readings will be in a course packet, in addition to two or three books TBA.

Grading (tentative)

Exams (60%)

Paper (25%)

Class participation and forum posts (15%)



  • Department of Sociology

    The University of Texas at Austin
    305 E 23rd St, A1700
    CLA 3.306
    Austin, TX 78712-1086
    512-232-6300