Department of Sociology

Lynette Osborne


Ph.D., Purdue University

Lecturer

Contact

Interests


Gender, Education, Women/Minorities in STEM, Deviance, Research Methods/Statistics, Evaluation Research

Courses


SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

45340 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 930am-1030am CLA 1.402

Course Description

This course will center on the topic of research methods and data analysis associated with gender and human sexual behavior for the purposes of prediction, explanation and decision-making. Students will be exposed to the process of quantitative and qualitative research including development of research questions, variables for investigation, conducting a content analysis, development of a database, and using basic statistics to answer hypotheses. 

SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

45345 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 1100am-1200pm CLA 1.402

Course Description

This course will center on the topic of research methods and data analysis associated with gender and human sexual behavior for the purposes of prediction, explanation and decision-making. Students will be exposed to the process of quantitative and qualitative research including development of research questions, variables for investigation, conducting a content analysis, development of a database, and using basic statistics to answer hypotheses. 

SOC 318 • Juvenile Delinquency

45360 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm UTC 4.110

COURSE DESCRIPTION 

In this course, we will engage in an analysis of historical, economic, and social conditions affecting both difficulties in socializing youth and the evolution of the state's formal systems of control.  We will also learn about current issues in youth and delinquency as well as programs designed to aid in deterrence and rehabilitation of youth.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

At the end of this course, students will be able to

  • Describe historical trends in delinquency
  • Identify and describe current trends in youth and delinquency
  • Use sociological theories of deviance to analyze trends
  • Identify and interpret data from government sources
  • Analyze scholarly research on delinquency

Reading Expectations

The readings and assignments for this course are substantial. Please consider the workload before committing to the class. Readings will be due each class and we will used to discuss historical and current issues. 

Grading

1. Discussion Day Lead (50 points)

It is important that each student arrives on time and participates MEANINGFULLY on her/his assigned day. You will be responsible for answering questions regarding both assigned materials as well as any films that are due for that section. Come to class with a strong understanding of the materials and/or questions about items that you are unclear on. Five meaningful contributions to the day’s discussion will earn 50 points

(5=50, 4=40, 3=30, 2=20, 1=10, 0=0). If you miss your assigned day, you will either need to plan on participating on the last Discussion Day or take the zero.

2. Readings Briefs (75 points total)

Each day, students will come to class with typed summaries of the day’s readings. These summaries will include a Brief summary (bullet points are fine) of the readings as well as two critical comments or discussion questions. On 6-7 occasions, I will collect these for credit (5 will count for 15 points each). Students must be in class to be able to turn in Briefs. Briefs turned in without attendance will be considered a violation of the Academic Honor Code and will result in disciplinary action.

3. Writing Assignment (25 points)

Students will write a 1-2 page analysis of a news article related to juvenile delinquency. This paper will use concepts and theories from the class to help understand what was reported in the article. 

4. Exams (150 points total)

There will be four exams in this class; three will count for credit. Three exams are based on the preceding module; the final is cumulative. They will be in-class exams on Canvas, multiple-choice, fill in, and/or possibly short answer. No early or late exams will be offered; if you miss an exam, plan to take the final.

How to calculate your grade

Take the points you have earned and divide by the total possible points for the assignment/exam. Do this as well for your total course grade by adding up the points you have earned and dividing by the total points possible in the class.

SOC 318 • Juvenile Delinquency

44505 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm CLA 0.126

COURSE DESCRIPTION 

In this course, we will engage in an analysis of historical, economic, and social conditions affecting both difficulties in socializing youth and the evolution of the state's formal systems of control.  We will also learn about current issues in youth and delinquency as well as programs designed to aid in deterrence and rehabilitation of youth.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

At the end of this course, students will be able to

  • Describe historical trends in delinquency
  • Identify and describe current trends in youth and delinquency
  • Use sociological theories of deviance to analyze trends
  • Identify and interpret data from government sources
  • Analyze scholarly research on delinquency

SOC 366 • Deviance

44630 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm WEL 4.224

Course Description

This course examines deviant behavior in the US.  The course begins by defining different types of deviance (negative and positive).  Discussions of types of deviance, how/why we define certain activities as deviant, how deviance changes over time, and how we understand deviant behavior through theories will be the main focus of the course. Empirical, peer reviewed journal articles will be used to learn about current deviance research findings.  Theory articles will be used to demonstrate core theories and how they can be used to understand and predict behavior.

Learning Objectives

By the end of a successfully completed term, students will be able to:

  • define deviance and understand the difference between positive and negative deviance;
  • explain how ideas about what counts as deviance changes over time and how these changes are reflected in society;
  • discuss current research on deviance in the US; 
  • explain and apply various theoretical approaches to deviant behavior.

Additional Objectives

This course is also designed to teach and/or improve the following skills:

  • critical thinking
  • professional/academic writing
  • comprehension of challenging material

Required Materials:                 

Articles:  required articles will be posted on Bb as .pdf or .doc attachments.

Films:  viewing several films is also required.  Titles are on the schedule.  You may find them online or order them from a source like Netflix or iTunes.

Grading:

In class participation  75 point

Reading Briefs           50 points

Journal Analysis         25 points

Three exams             50 points each

Project                     100 points

Grading scale

100-90 = A, 89-88 = B+, 87-80 = B, 79-78 = C+, 77-70 = C, 69-68 = D+, 67-60 = D, below 59 = F

As a general rule, I do not assign minuses (-).  If you earn an 80%, you get the B.  However, in circumstances when the grade is earned by rounding up, a minus will be assigned (e.g.:  79.9=B-).

 

 

SOC 318 • Juvenile Delinquency

44970 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CLA 0.128

COURSE DESCRIPTION 

In this course, we will engage in an analysis of historical, economic, and social conditions affecting both difficulties in socializing youth and the evolution of the state's formal systems of control.  We will also learn about current issues in youth and delinquency as well as programs designed to aid in deterrence and rehabilitation of youth.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

At the end of this course, students will be able to

  • Describe historical trends in delinquency
  • Identify and describe current trends in youth and delinquency
  • Use sociological theories of deviance to analyze trends
  • Identify and interpret data from government sources
  • Analyze scholarly research on delinquency

SOC 366 • Deviance

45070 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm CLA 1.102

Course Description

This course examines deviant behavior in the US.  The course begins by defining different types of deviance (negative and positive).  Discussions of types of deviance, how/why we define certain activities as deviant, how deviance changes over time, and how we understand deviant behavior through theories will be the main focus of the course. Empirical, peer reviewed journal articles will be used to learn about current deviance research findings.  Theory articles will be used to demonstrate core theories and how they can be used to understand and predict behavior.

Learning Objectives

By the end of a successfully completed term, students will be able to:

  • define deviance and understand the difference between positive and negative deviance;
  • explain how ideas about what counts as deviance changes over time and how these changes are reflected in society;
  • discuss current research on deviance in the US; 
  • explain and apply various theoretical approaches to deviant behavior.

Additional Objectives

This course is also designed to teach and/or improve the following skills:

  • critical thinking
  • professional/academic writing
  • comprehension of challenging material

Required Materials:                 

Articles:  required articles will be posted on Bb as .pdf or .doc attachments.

Films:  viewing several films is also required.  Titles are on the schedule.  You may find them online or order them from a source like Netflix or iTunes.

Grading:

In class participation  75 point

Reading Briefs           50 points

Journal Analysis         25 points

Three exams             50 points each

Project                     100 points

Grading scale

100-90 = A, 89-88 = B+, 87-80 = B, 79-78 = C+, 77-70 = C, 69-68 = D+, 67-60 = D, below 59 = F

As a general rule, I do not assign minuses (-).  If you earn an 80%, you get the B.  However, in circumstances when the grade is earned by rounding up, a minus will be assigned (e.g.:  79.9=B-).

 

 

SOC 366 • Deviance

46293 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm RLM 5.122

Course Description

This course examines deviant behavior in the US.  The course begins by defining different types of deviance (negative and positive).  Discussions of types of deviance, how/why we define certain activities as deviant, how deviance changes over time, and how we understand deviant behavior through theories will be the main focus of the course. Empirical, peer reviewed journal articles will be used to learn about current deviance research findings.  Theory articles will be used to demonstrate core theories and how they can be used to understand and predict behavior.

Learning Objectives

By the end of a successfully completed term, students will be able to:

  • define deviance and understand the difference between positive and negative deviance;
  • explain how ideas about what counts as deviance changes over time and how these changes are reflected in society;
  • discuss current research on deviance in the US; 
  • explain and apply various theoretical approaches to deviant behavior.

Additional Objectives

This course is also designed to teach and/or improve the following skills:

  • critical thinking
  • professional/academic writing
  • comprehension of challenging material

Required Materials:                 

Articles:  required articles will be posted on Bb as .pdf or .doc attachments.

Films:  viewing several films is also required.  Titles are on the schedule.  You may find them online or order them from a source like Netflix or iTunes.

Grading:

In class participation  75 point

Reading Briefs           50 points

Journal Analysis         25 points

Three exams             50 points each

Project                     100 points

Grading scale

100-90 = A, 89-88 = B+, 87-80 = B, 79-78 = C+, 77-70 = C, 69-68 = D+, 67-60 = D, below 59 = F

As a general rule, I do not assign minuses (-).  If you earn an 80%, you get the B.  However, in circumstances when the grade is earned by rounding up, a minus will be assigned (e.g.:  79.9=B-).

 

 

SOC 318 • Juvenile Delinquency

46371 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CLA 0.102

COURSE DESCRIPTION 

In this course, we will engage in an analysis of historical, economic, and social conditions affecting both difficulties in socializing youth and the evolution of the state's formal systems of control.  We will also learn about current issues in youth and delinquency as well as programs designed to aid in deterrence and rehabilitation of youth.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

At the end of this course, students will be able to

  • Describe historical trends in delinquency
  • Identify and describe current trends in youth and delinquency
  • Use sociological theories of deviance to analyze trends
  • Identify and interpret data from government sources
  • Analyze scholarly research on delinquency

SOC 366 • Deviance

46500 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm GDC 6.202

Description 

Substantively, the course is an introduction to sociological perspectives on deviance and social control.  Students will read sociological research on a variety of topics, ranging from relatively harmless social diversions to serious and possibly shocking rule violations. 

By its very nature, the study of deviance involves subject matter that some people regard as offensive.  You are not asked to give up your own ethical standards.  You are expected to:

(1) examine your own values dispassionately, as one kind of datum about your own socialization and culture; and

(2) bracket your own values while you apply sociological perspectives to understand various examples of deviance. 

Your own experience is a resource for critical thought about the concepts examined here; at the same time, you should try not to become overly sensitive or defensive about sociological handling of social arenas in which you participate.  The objective of the sociological approach is to understand social processes, not to judge.

Texts

Required

Adler and Adler, Constructions of Deviance, 7th ed.

Recommended

ASA Style Guide, 4th ed. (order from ASA online book store:  http://www.e-noah.net/asa/asashoponlineservice/ProductDetails.aspx?productID=ASAOE701S10); or

ASA Style Guide, 3rd ed. (short version available online free:  http://www.asanet.org/Quick%20Style%20Guide.pdf)

 

 

Requirements and grading:                                            

Writing Requirement:

The writing emphasis is on developing a scholarly voice and style.  The assignments are six short papers (250-300 words), each focusing on the analysis of a scholarly article, and a longer review of the literature (6-8 pagers), analyzing and organizating information on a topic of particular interest to you.

The assignments for the course should take an average of about six hours per week to complete. 

Grading:

7 short papers (omit one or drop the lowest grade)                   30%

Long paper (draft and final version)                                        30%

Presentation                                                                          5%

Feedback on classmates’ presentations                                     5%

Hour exam                                                                           20%

Daily work

(informal writing, pop quizzes feedback on short papers)   10%

Specific instructions for all papers will be posted on Blackboard. 

Grading Scale

94-100+           A

90-93               A-

87-89               B+

84-86               B

80-83               B-

etc.

Profile Pages



  • Department of Sociology

    The University of Texas at Austin
    305 E 23rd St, A1700
    CLA 3.306
    Austin, TX 78712-1086
    512-232-6300