Individual Writing Assignment Unit 2

1. The following are pairs of sentence that resemble each other superficially but differ in structure. Explain the differences in structure in grammatical terms (e.g., parts of speech identified correctly) provide an explanation of the reasoning behind your analyses, using tests to justify your conclusions (e.g., discussing coreference, movement of sentence constituents) and diagram each sentence. Note that you will NOT receive full credit unless you provide diagrams and justifications of your analyses.

1. A. The crowd might be excited by the speech.
B. The crowd might be sleeping by midnight.

2. A. Cuthbert was sent an invitation to the party.
B. An invitation to the party was sent Cuthbert.

You may find sentence B ungrammatical or marginally acceptable, but many speakers of British English would find it perfectly "cricket."

2. This sentence should be ambiguous. Explain the grammatical reasons behind the ambiguity, providing an explanation of the reasoning behind your analyses that uses appropriate tests, and provide diagrams for both meanings. Do you think this sentence would necessarily be ambiguous in context? If so, why? If not, why not?

1. They are terrifying children.

3. provide the formula (verb string) that describes the main verb in each sentence and give the tense, aspect, mood (if the verb is modal), and voice (active/passive) of each verb. This is NOT a writing assignment, and you do NOT have to diagram the sentences, but you MUST identify the tense, aspect, mood (if necessary), and voice of each verb to receive full credit.

1.Henrietta hadn't ever considered writing greeting cards for a living.
2.Ernest should check his tires more often.
3.Augusta has been investigated by the FBI.
4.Gertie had not passed up the unusual opportunity.
5.Alfred will be earning a generous bonus.
6.Ernestine was terribly late.


Syllabus Class schedule
Assignments Handouts
WWW Resources

Return to main page.

Return to assignments index.

Return to unit index.


Comments to: Sara Kimball
Last updated January, 2001