Linguistics Courses

Spring 2003

Graduate Course Listings and Descriptions

To reduce file size, listings for undergraduate and graduate courses may be viewed separately. This document contains graduate courses only. Undergraduate courses are in a separate document. Click on the course name for the course description.

For more information on these courses (including instructor, course time and course location), see the Spring 2003 Linguistics course schedule (graduate).

Spring 2003

LIN380S Sociolinguistics
LIN381K Phonology II
LIN381L Semantics II
LIN381M Phonetics
LIN381S Syntax II
LIN383 History of the French Language
LIN383 Intro to Synchronic Linguistics: German
LIN384 Structure of Chatino
LIN386M Computational Linguistics I
LIN391 Studies in English Phonology

LIN392 Linguistic Approaches to Narrative
LIN392 Optimality in Romance

LIN392 Reading and Writing Grammars

LIN392 Syntax and Discourse
LIN393 Linguistic Poetics
LIN393 The Psalms: Text, Language, and Art
LIN393-2 Language Acquisition
LIN393-4 Neurolinguistics
LIN393-5 Translation: Theory, History, and Practice
LIN393P Experimental Phonetics
LIN393S Event Structure and Aspectual Systems
LIN393S Word Meaning & Event Structure
LIN395 Conf Course in Linguistics
LIN396 Identities and Language Ideologies
LIN396-2 Intro to Graduate Linguistic Anthropology

LIN 380S: Sociolinguistics (Zhang)

This is an introductory course to the field of sociolinguistics for graduate students in Linguistics and related fields (e.g., Anthropology, Education). Prior background in Linguistics is assumed. This course surveys the kinds of issues with which sociolinguistics deal, the theories and methods which they have developed, and some of their major findings about the nature of sociolinguistic variation and change. Primary emphasis is on work within the area of ìsocially linguisticî linguistics (Hymes 1973), which brings social considerations to bear on problems of description and analysis common to phonology, syntax, historical linguistics and other ìcoreî areas of linguistics. However, we will also survey albeit more briefly, work in the sociology of language (what Hymes refers to as ìthe social as well as the linguisticî) and the ethnography of speaking (what Hymes refers to as socially constituted linguistics).

Prerequisites

Graduate or undergraduate courses in syntax and (e.g., Ling380L (syntax), Ling380K (phonology), Ling391 (English Grammar, English phonology)), or consent from the instructor.

Requirements

Attendance, participation in class discussion.
3 short reaction papers (4-5 double-spaced pages each).
1 midterm paper (5-6 double-spaced pages).
1 final paper (10-12 double-spaced pages).

Texts

Coupland, Nikolas, and Adam Jaworski. 1997. Sociolinguistics: A Reader. New York: St. Martinís Press. (required)
A course reader. (required)

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LIN 381K: Phonology II (Crowhurst)

This course is a continuation of LIN 380K (Phonology I), completing an introduction to contemporary phonology, with an emphasis on Optimality Theory. The overarching theme of this semesterís work will be prosody. In the first section, we will examine metrically based patterns of word stress. In the second part of the semester, we will survey prosodic patterns that are featurally based, in three specific areas: (i) tone, (ii) vowel harmony, (iii) nasal harmony. In the third section of the course, we will briefly consider the role of phonology in morphology, with special focus on reduplication, truncation, and the special role of the prosodic word). At the end of two of the three sections, students will complete a short paper developing an optimality theoretic analysis of a relevant pattern in a language of their choosing.

Prerequisites

Graduate standing and Phonology I (380K)

Requirements

The grade will be based on homework assignments, and two short papers, one each for two of the three sections of the course.

Texts

Kenstowicz. Phonology in Generative Grammar. Blackwell.
Pullum & Ladusaw. Phonetic Symbol Guide. 2nd Ed. Chicago.
Kager, R. (1999). Optimality Theory (CUP).
Readings, drawn from the literature on Optimality Theory (and possibly the pre-OT literature) will be made available in a course packet, or will be placed on reserve in the Department of Linguistics.

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LIN 380M: Semantics I (Schwarz)

This course is an introduction to the study of meaning in natural language. Topics include: Sentence meanings as truth-conditions, definite descriptions, adjectival modification, relative clauses, quantificational noun phrases, scope ambiguities, anaphoric pronouns, ellipsis. The proposed analyses will make use of concepts from mathematics and logic, viz. sets, relations, functions, statement logic, and predicate logic. These tools will be introduced in tandem with the linguistic material.

Prerequisites

Graduate standing.

Requirements

None

Texts

Irene Helm and Angelika Kratzer: Semantics in Generative Grammar, Blackwell, London, 1998.
Other required and optional readings (papers, book chapters) will be made available.

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LIN 381K: Phonology II (Crowhurst)

This course is a continuation of LIN 380K (Phonology I), completing an introduction to contemporary phonology, with an emphasis on Optimality Theory.

The overarching theme of this semesterÌs work will be prosody. In the first section, we will examine metrically based patterns of word stress. In the second part of the semester, we will survey prosodic patterns that are featurally based, in three specific areas: (i) tone, (ii) vowel harmony, (iii) nasal harmony. In the third section of the course, we will briefly consider the role of phonology in morphology, with special focus on reduplication, truncation, and the special role of the prosodic word).

At the end of two of the three sections, students will complete a short paper developing an optimality theoretic analysis of a relevant pattern in a language of their choosing.

Prerequisites

Graduate standing and Phonology I (LIN 380K)

Requirements

The grade will be based on homework assignments, and two short papers, one each for two of the three sections of the course.

Texts

Kenstowicz. Phonology in Generative Grammar. Blackwell.
Pullum & Ladusaw. Phonetic Symbol Guide. 2nd Ed. Chicago.
Kager, R. (1999). Optimality Theory (CUP).
Readings, drawn from the literature on Optimality Theory (and possibly the pre-OT literature) will be made available in a course packet, or will be placed on reserve in the Department of Linguistics.

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LIN 381L: Syntax II (Green)

This is the second semester course of the graduate requirement in syntax. The course takes an approach to syntactic analysis in which concepts from the Government and Binding framework are integrated with concepts from Minimalist approaches. In the introduction to the course, we will review general principles of modules of the grammar: Theta-Theory, Case Theory, Binding Theory and Control and Movement Theory. The course will focus on two types of arguments in syntactic analysis: 1) empirical arguments and 2) theoretical arguments. Empirical arguments will be based on data, while theoretical arguments will be related to the restrictiveness of the system used to account for the data. In the course, we will formulate hypotheses based on data and consider additional data that may lead us to modify the hypotheses. As the course progresses, we will address topics such as argument structure and lexical rules of derivation, lexical and functional projections, and cross-linguistic variation related to morphological properties of languages. In the final section of the course, we will discuss the development of an alternative system which relies on the interface levels Logical Form and Phonetic Form and accounts in an economical way for the phenomena that were previously argued to apply at D-Structure and S-Structure.

Prerequisites

The prerequisites for the course are LIN 380L and LIN 380M or consent of the instructor.

Requirements

1) problem sets
2) presentation of journal article
3) analytical paper

Texts

Chomsky, N. 1970. Remarks on Nominalization. In Readings in English Transformational Grammar. Jacobs and Rosenbaum (eds.). Ginn and Co.
Chomsky, N. and H. Lasnik. 1993. The Theory of Principles and Parameters. In Syntax: An International Handbook of Contemporary Research. Jacobs et al. (eds.). Walter de Gruyter.
Larson, R. 1988. On the Double Object Construction. Linguistic Inquiry 19, 335-391.
Webelhuth, G. (ed.). 1995. Government and Binding Theory and the Minimalist Program. Blackwell.

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LIN 381M: Phonetics (Lindblom)

The general theme of this course is: "What is phonetics?" A broad survey of major topics in modern phonetics will be presented. Theoretical issues as well as applications (e.g. speech technology).

In the first part we will familiarize ourselves with the traditional descriptive methods of phonetics: auditory analysis and transcription. This will include a presentation of phonetic alphabets and distinctive feature theory as well as exercises based on both known and unknown languages. The goal is to establish a general framework for specifying speech in terms of its linguistic and phonetic (mostly articulatory) properties sufficient for later phonology classes. (The book by Ladefoged is the text for this part. It will be supplemented by hand-outs).

Given this background, we will continue with acoustic phonetics. Basic theory and applications in the form of laboratory assignments and spectrogram readings (book by Pickett plus hand-outs). Our objective is to make every student familiar with the source-filter theory of speech production which is central to the acoustic specification of phonetic phenomena. Correlates of segmental and prosodic phenomena will be defined from a cross-linguistic perspective. The representation of speech signals in the auditory system will also be discussed. The rule of thumb in selecting the material for this part is as follows: Nothing will be introduced that does not have an explanatory bearing on the issues of linguistic phonetics: ëFormants without tearsí!

The third and final part will be more problem-oriented and will present, in a preliminary manner, some current ëhot topicsí. This means a review of work on speech production, speech perception, speech development and the phonetic bases of phonology which aims at giving a brief, but coherent and unified view of ëhow speech worksí.

Prerequisites

Graduate standing.

Requirements

TBA

Texts

Ladefoged. A Course in Phonetics.
J. M. Pickett. Acoustics of Speech Communication, The: Fundamentals, Speech Perception Theory, and Technology

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LIN 381S: Semantics II (Schwarz)

This advanced course on semantics aims to apply the kinds of tools and methods developed in LIN380M to a wider range of phenomena and constructions found in natural language. Among the phenomena and constructions we will study are anaphora, tense, modal verbs, sentence embedding verbs, interrogatives, and presuppositions.

Prerequisites

LIN 380M or instructor's permission

Requirements

TBA

Texts

The last three chapters of Heim, Irene & Angelika Kratzer, Semantics in Generative Grammar, Blackwell, London, 1998. Additional required and optional readings (papers, book chapters) will be made available.

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LIN 383: Histoire de la langue/History of the French Language (Bauer)

THIS COURSE WILL BE TAUGHT IN FRENCH. Meets with FR 380L.

In this course we will analyze how French emerged from Latin and became the language it is today. We will discuss the shift from Gaulish to Latin/Romance and its background and the major developments in phonology, morphology and syntax. We will also discuss the successive stages of French each with its own characteristics. We subsequently will focus on a number specific changes such as nasalization or the development of schwa, the loss of case distinctions in Latin and French, or the development of the definite article, negation, gender, agreement, and word order. The course will include analysis of French texts that illustrate specific phenomena or stages in the development of the language. Students will have the opportunity to suggest topics of their special interest.

Prerequisites

Graduate standing.

Requirements

*One written exam during the semester (30%)
*Reading assignments and class discussion (20%)
*One preliminary paper (10%)
*Paper and oral presentation (40%)
*Final exam: NO.

Texts

-Picoche, J and C. Marchello-Nizia. 1991. Histoire de la language française. Paris: Nathan. ISBN: 2-09-190760-X. (Or the latest edition.)
-Marchello-Nizia, C. 1999. Le français en diachronie: douze siËcles díÈvolution. Paris: Ophrys.
-Reading packet.

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LIN 383: Introduction to German Synchronic Linguistics (Boas)

This course is designed to introduce graduate students to the formal and functional study of the German language. At the beginning of the course, we will be concerned with the structural properties (ëbuilding blocksí) of German: phonetics & phonology (the study of speech sounds and how to put them together), morphology (the analysis of words), syntax (the analysis of sentences and their construction), and semantics (the meanings of words and sentences). In this part of the course, we will focus on formal descriptions of sounds, words, and sentences and we will learn about rule systems that can be used to describe these "building blocks" of the German language. The primary focus of this course is on Standard German. Throughout the semester we will also compare and contrast the linguistic structures of Standard German with those of Texas German as documented by the Texas German Dialect Project (TGDP), an on-going research project on the structure of Texas German. At the same time, we will pay special attention to contrastive linguistic issues, i.e. the structural differences between English, Standard German, and Texas German.

During the last weeks of the course we will take a look at a number of sociolinguistic issues. We will consider regional, social, and gender factors which influence language use, as well as attitudes toward different language varieties and the speakers who use them. Topics to be discussed will include (but are not limited to) regional dialects (Swabian, Low German, Swiss German, Texas German), language contact, "Gastarbeiterdeutsch" (foreign worker's German), differences in language use between men and women, and political language in East vs. West Germany.

This course is taught in English.

Prerequisites

Graduate standing, or permission of the instructor. Reading knowledge of German is required.

Requirements

(1) Homework: 10%,
(2) Four in-class presentations ("Referate") of book chapters / articles (10% each): 40%
(3) Final paper: 50%

Texts

Russ, Charles V.J. (1994): The German language today. A linguistic introduction. London/New York: Routledge.
Class Reader in the departmentís reading room and on electronic reserve (http://reserves.lib.utexas.edu). Password(s) will be announced in class.

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LIN 384: Structure of Chatino (Woodbury)

The purpose of this course is to explore Chatino, a Sapotekan language spoken by about 20,000 people in Oaxaca, Mexico. We will:

(a) Gather and read critically the written literature on all varieties of Chatino;

(b) Compare the phonetics/phonology as described in the literature, to the varieties spoken by native Chatino speakers participating in or visiting the class, in order to pinpoint similarities and differences to what is described;

(c) On the basis of (b), come up with our own analysis of the phonetics/phonology, including an analysis of tone, which is not fully covered in the literature;

(d) Make a "thumbnail sketch" (brief description) of the grammar of your language.

Prerequisites

One or more courses in linguistics, and consent of the instructor.

Requirements

Weekly assignments (60%), final paper (40%).

Texts

To be made available.

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LIN 386-M: Computational Linguistics I (Kuhn)

Advances in computational linguistics and natural language processing have not only led to industrial applications of language technology; they can also provide useful tools for linguistic investigations of large online collections of text and speech, or for the validation of linguistic theories. Computational Linguistics I introduces the most important representations and algorithmic techniques used in classical, symbolic computational linguistics: regular expressions and finite-state methods, context-free grammars and parsing, feature structures and unification. The linguistic levels covered are phonology, morphology, syntax (and some semantics). We will apply the techniques in actual programming exercises, using the programming language Prolog. The course is oriented towards graduate students of linguistics; previous programming experience is not required.

The sequel to this course, Computational Linguistics II, will address corpus-oriented techniques and applications of natural language processing.

Prerequisites

Graduate standing. Syntax I or consent of instructor.

Requirements

TBA

Texts

Matthews, C., An introduction to natural language processing through PROLOG. London: Longman, 1998.

Jurafsky, D. and J. H. Martin, Speech and language processing: An Introduction to Natural Language Processing, Computational Linguistics, and Speech Recognition, Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 2000.

Background:

Gazdar, G. and C. Mellish, Natural language processing in PROLOG: An introduction to Computational Linguistics, Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley, 1989.

Pereira, F. C. N. and S. M. Shieber: Prolog and Natural Language Analysis. CSLI Lecture Notes No. 10. Stanford, CA: Center for the Study of Language and Information, 1987.

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LIN 391: Studies in English Phonology (Myers)

This course is an introduction to the sounds of English and the rules governing their distribution (i.e. which sounds can occur where in a word). Topics will include the following:

How the sounds of English are produced
How they are perceived
The differences among the accents of English, including British, Southern
American, and Northern American
How sounds are organized into syllables
Restrictions on the distribution of sounds
Stress and intonation
How children learn to pronounce English
How adults learn to pronounce English

Prerequisites

Graduate standing

Requirements

The grade will be based on homework assignments and three quizzes.

Texts

Peter Ladefoged, A Course in Phonetics (4th edition).

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LIN 392: Linguistic Approach to Narrative (Blyth)

Inherently interdisciplinary, the study of narrative extends the 'interpretive turn' to the social sciences. This course begins by reviewing early research on narrative within linguistics that focused on the formal structures of narrative discourse, that is, the parts of language characteristic of narrative, so-called story grammars. In these approaches, linguists attempted to answer the question: Why are the stories told that way? Of course, linguists soon discovered that to answer such a question, more contextual information was called for. Consequently, more recent sociolinguistic and pragmatic approaches to narrative have examined narrative discourse within the dynamic of human interaction. Human agency and imagination determine what gets included in narrativization, how events are plotted, and what they are supposed to mean to the interlocutors. While storytelling as a speech act exists all over the world, narratives differ enormously from culture to culture. Therefore, we will examine how narrative analysis may be used to explore a given culture. Finally, we will consider how we may apply narrative analysis to actual human problems. As a concrete example, we will study how narratives are used by therapists and patients alike to arrive at a diagnosis of mental illness. We will also consider what it means for researchers (linguists, therapists, sociologists, anthropologists, etc.) to refer to narratives as "data." NB: Students will be required to elicit narratives from various informants outside of class and to transcribe these narratives further analysis. Students may choose to focus their research on any language that they know and speak well.

Prerequisites

Graduate standing.

Requirements

Class discussion/participation 20%
Narrative assignment 10%
Class presentation 10%
Final paper (15-20 pages) 50%

Texts

Texts: 1. Riesman, C. 1993. Narrative Analysis. Thousand Oaks, CA and London. Sage Publications.
2. Ochs, E. & Capps, L. 2001 Living Narrative. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
3. Capps, L. & E. Ochs. 1995. Constructing Panic: The Discourse of Agoraphobia. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
4. Reading packet-Speedway Copies, basement of Dobie Mall

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LIN 392: Optimality in Romance (Montreuil)

In recent years, Optimality Theory has generated a number of challenging reanalyses in the filed of Romance phonology. This course proposes to acquaint students with these new developments. The degree to which they amount to more than mere reformulations and lead to greater insights and enhanced explicative power will be explored. After a short round of ìrefresherî lessons, the course is organized around three themes:

Prosodic domains: OT grammars can be constructed to reflect the way in which phonological generalizations respond to linguistic domains (moras, syllables, words, clitic groups, etcÖ). Specific readings from Spanish (Casali 1998), Gascon (Montreuil 2002), Picard (Cardoso 2002, 2003, Auger 2002), Piedmontese (Wiltshire & Maranzana 1999), Eastern Andalusian (Gerfen 2001) and more.

Opacity: Generalizations which are either not true or not apparent at the output level cannot be directly captured by output-driven models like OT. Several indirect ways of expressing these facts of grammar have been proposed, and their relative merits will be evaluated as we review cases of (sometimes multiple) opacity in Argentenian Spanish (Harris & Kaisse 2001, Wiltshire & Baker 2003), Romansch and Alsatian French (Montreuil 2003), among others.

Phonological change: OT notoriously expresses variation in typologically satisfying ways, but does this include diachronic variation? Attempts to determine in a principled way the exact distribution of work between grammar vs. lexicon in linguistic evolution reveal a number of particularly thorny issues. These will emerge as we study various cases of palatalization and yodization in early French and Spanish (Montreuil 2003), syncope in Latin (Jacobs 2003) and Old Spanish (Hartkemeyer 2000), cluster-reduction in Gallo-Romance (Gess 2002, 2003), allomorphy in Medieval French (Bullock 2003), etcÖ

Notes: This course is cross-listed and will be taught in English. It assumes some familiarity with OT (such as may have been acquired in FR 383K or LIN 380K, 381K). In French Linguistics, it can satisfy requirements for area 1 or 5; in Romance Linguistics: field 1 or 3).

Additional information is available from the instructor at jpmontreuil@mail.utexas.edu.

Requirements

Three mini-papers in outline form, with short oral presentations in class, are required (one for each theme). No final exam. Last mini-paper due by May 8.

Texts

A booklet which will include worksheets, most of our Romance articles plus a few general readings on OT (articles by McCarthy, Ito & Mester, Haspelmath, Padgett, etc.): available at Paradigm copies.

Kager, RenÈ. 1999. Optimality Theory. Cambridge University Press.

McCarthy, John. 2002. A Thematic Guide to Optimality Theory. Cambridge University Press.

McMahon, April. 2002. Change, Chance and Optimality. Oxford Linguistics.

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LIN 392: Reading and Writing Grammars (England)

The object of this course is to analyze what makes a good grammar. A set of about five grammars will be chosen to read and analyze, from the perspectives of general readability, completeness, usefulness for looking up specific information, usefulness for comparative/typological information, and usefulness for speakers. Several evaluative problems involving the selected grammars will be assigned. Additional topics will cover sources for linguistic questionnaires and elicitation sessions, how to collect and analyze texts, and what are the uses of elicited material and text material in grammar writing. A final paper will be assigned, and can be on one of two different topics: 1) for those students who already have data that they are in the process of analyzing, the final paper will consist of a detailed outline of a grammar plus several representative sections; and 2) for those students who do not have data that they are in the process of analyzing, the final paper will consist of a thorough critique of a grammar (not one of the ones assigned for class), with a reworked outline and several representative sections.

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LIN 393P: Syntax and Discourse (Lambrecht)

The course will be taught in English or in French, depending on the participants.

Meets with FR 392K.

The subject matter of this course is the relationship between the morpho-syntactic and prosodic structure of sentences in French and the discourse contexts in which they can be used as units of propositional information. The first part of the course will be an introduction to the information structure component of language. Using the theoretical framework of Lambrecht 1994, we will try to arrive at working definitions of such concepts as ëold and new informationí, ëdefinitenessí, ëtopicí, ëfocusí, ëpresuppositioní, etc. In the second part we will apply this framework to the analysis of specific sentence constructions, especially certain frequently occurring deviations from the canonical (SVO) sentence type, such as subject-verb inversion, NP detachments, and cleft constructions. As much as possible, our analyses will be based on actual language data, in particular recorded conversations.

Prerequisites

A basic knowledge of syntax and (at least) a reading knowledge of French.

Requirements

Homework assignments 20%, oral presentation and short paper 30%, term paper 50%.

Texts

(i) Knud Lambrecht, Information structure and sentence form. Cambridge University Press, 1994;
(ii) A reading packet to be made available through the Campus Copy Service.

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LIN 393: Linguistic Poetics (Woodbury)

This class deals with speech play, verbal art, and poetics from linguistic and anthropological points of view. This typically includes such speech types as puns, jokes, play languages, proverbs, riddles, verbal dueling, narrative, myth, song, poetry, and ritual and theatrical performance; and employs such formal features as parallelism, rhyme, alliteration, meter, prosodic distortion, and versification, and such literary tropes as iconicity, imagery, metaphor, metonymy, and quotation. Our point is that these elements and structures of 'typical' speech play are broadly characteristic of all speech, including even conversation and expository prose; and that their study in heightened, artistic contexts provides the proper framework for any linguistic or anthropological approach to both form and content in naturally-occurring speech activity. For linguistics, such a framework raises the crucial issue of the limits of grammatical knowledge and competence, as against a more general competence for poetics and discourse. That is, have our grammatical theories attempted to account for elements more properly belonging to poetics, such as parallelism in gapping and respectively constructions; meter/versification in the postlexical 'prosodic hierarchy'; or imagistic tropes in reduplicative and echo forms? And can we do better by accounting for these phenomena alongside related poetic phenomena? For anthropology and the study of speech activity as social behavior, this approach offers a framework within which to organize the formal structures discovered in empirical investigations, running a gamut from the unconscious poetic organization found in natural conversation (e.g., turn-taking systems) to the highly conscious poetic organization of a Shakespearian sonnet, or of a disguised speech game.

The class will have an analytic, empirical orientation. Apart from discussions of weekly readings, classes will concentrate on the analysis of oral, videotaped, and written materials provided at first by the instructors but later by students, from their own research. Issues of transcription, written representation, and translation will be addressed. The approach will be cross-cultural and ethnographic in orientation.

Prerequisites

Students should consult with the instructors before registering for the course. Students are expected bring to bear on classwork a background in either Linguistics or Anthropology. We define this practically as having taken (or taking concurrently) three graduate courses in Anthropology, Linguistics (core courses only), or comparaable linguistics courses from any of the following language departments: Germanic, French and Italian, Spanish and Portuguese, Slavic languages, Classics, or English. If all three courses are in Anthropology, at least one of them should be in Linguistic Anthropology.

Requirements

Homework (30%), Final paper (70%)

Texts

None (Reserve readings only)

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LIN 393: The Psalms: Text, Language, and Art

This seminar is designed to introduce the students to the Book of Psalms: the text, the language, the message and the cultural background. The Book of Psalms is one of the most revered and most celebrated books in the Bible. IT is studies, recited, chanted and memorized. Many of the Psalms have become an integral part of the liturgy of both Jews and Christians, and some of them (like Psalm 23, ìGod is my shepherdî) are repeatedly recited and chanted by members of both groups.

We will read the text in the original Hebrew, translate and interpret it, and discuss the different kinds of psalms -- their styles, language, and art.

Prerequisites

Graduate standing. [Qualified undergraduate seniors may obtain special permission to attend this class. Please consult the instructor.] Interested students without adequate background in Hebrew are urged to contact Professor Bar-Adon who will be glad to help them overcome this hurdle, in order to fully benefit from the course. Call 471-1701 or 471-1365.

Requirements

Regular assignments, class readings and discussions, term paper.

Texts

The Hebrew Bible, with or without English translation.

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LIN 393: Language Acquisition (Meier)

This course is an introduction to the linguistic and psychological issues involved in the study of how children acquire a first language. Among the topics to be considered are Chomskyís discussion of the problem of language acquisition, the biological basis of language acquisition, infant speech perception, the relationship between language acquisition and the linguistic input to the child, research methods in language acquisition, the acquisition of American Sign Language, and the childís representation of grammatical categories.

Prerequisites

Graduate standing.

Requirements

Course requirements will include two research assignments involving the collection and analysis of data, several short "critical commentaries" on the assigned papers, and a final exam.

Texts

A packet of readings which will include many key papers in the field. Optional Text: Erika Hoff, Language Development.

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LIN 393-4: Neurolinguistics (Sussman)

Neurolinguistics is a survey-type course that explores subject areas related to the neurobiological representation of language in the brain. It begins with a complete review of basic neuroanatomy. Topics then include: cortical areas involved in language (brain stimulation studies); subcortical areas involved in language; a description of recent work on aphasia emphasizing what can be learned about language representation from empirical study of aphasic language vis-a-vis area of lesion; hemispheric specialization for language. The last topic includes anatomical differences of left and right hemispheres, split-brain subjects, bilingual speakers, and bilingual aphasics.

Prerequisites

Graduate standing.

Requirements

TBA

Texts

Outside reading list and note packet.

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LIN 393: Translation: Theory, History, and Practice (Bar-Adon)

Meets with MEL 391.1, MES 381.33, EDC 385G, CL 380.

This seminar concentrates on various historical, theoretical, and practical aspects of translation. Among the topics to be covered:

Applications

Implications for teaching foreign languages and literatures.

Special Treat

Bibliographic guidance with visits to the library.

Prerequisites

Graduate standing.

Requirements

Assigned and optional readings, class discussion, oral reports, and a term paper.

Texts

A list of required and optional texts will be provided in class.

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LIN 393P: Experimental Phonetics (Lindblom)

The goal of this course is to let the students do their own small research projects. Experimental work in the lab will be encouraged.

With respect to organization, the course will continue where the 381M lectures ended. That means that, initially, there will be classes in which we will further pursue what we began in the final part of 381M, namely the review of current work on speaking, listening and learning to speak. Topics for projects usually suggest themselves during this part. Once students have their own projects, we will abandon the lecturing and switch to a one-on-one format.

Prerequisites

LIN 381M or consent of instructor.

Requirements

Written term paper and a presentation of project in class towards the end of the semester.

Texts

No text.

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LIN 393S: Event Structure and Aspectual Systems (Smith)

Meets with Wechslerís LIN 393S ìWord Meaning and Event Structure.î

Aspect is the semantic domain of temporal point of view in language. Aspect comprises 'viewpoints' such as perfective and imperfective; and categories of situation such as states and events. Viewpoints are conveyed by morphemes; situation types are conveyed by verbs and their arguments, which function as covert linguistic categories. All languages appear to have aspectual categories.

We will spend the first part of the semester discussing aspectual systems, and will then focus on the representation of event structure within word meaning, and associated lexical topics. The topics include situation type (states, events, and various subtypes of event), argument structure, lexical decomposition, aspect shift (coercion), the analysis of resultatives, and questions surrounding the 'Achievement' situation type.

Important themes of the course: how to analyze aspectual systems; how to analyze verb meaning; and similiarities and differences in the systems of different languages.

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LIN 393S: Word Meaning and Event Structure (Wechsler)

Meets with Smithís LIN 393S ìEvent Structure and Aspectual Systems.î Aspect is the semantic domain of temporal point of view in language. Aspect comprises 'viewpoints' such as perfective and imperfective; and categories of situation such as states and events. Viewpoints are conveyed by morphemes; situation types are conveyed by verbs and their arguments, which function as covert linguistic categories. All languages appear to have some aspectual categories.

We will spend the first part of the semester discussing aspectual systems, and will then focus on the representation of event structure within word meaning, and associated lexical topics. The topics include situation type (states, events, and various subtypes of event), argument structure, lexical decomposition, aspect shift (coercion), the analysis of resultatives, and questions surrounding the 'Achievement' situation type.

Important themes of the course: how to analyze aspectual systems; how to analyze verb meaning; and similiarities and differences in the systems of different languages.

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LIN 395: Conference Course

Individual instruction. Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Consent of instructor must be obtained. Requirements: You must have the prior written consent of the instructor before you register for or add this course. Graduate Conference Course Agreement forms are available in Calhoun 508. Please see Kathy Ross, Graduate Coordinator, for information.

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LIN 396: Identities and Language Ideologies (Walters)

Contemporary research in the fields of sociolinguistics and linguistic anthropology often takes one of two foci: the individual and his or her identity (or, more properly, identities) or language ideology, the beliefs about language that language users hold. Many researchers acknowledge the necessity of linking the twoóidentity and ideologyóbut the task is far from complete. In this course, we'll seek to understand why forging links is so difficult and where connections might be found. To achieve this goal, we'll read broadly in work from linguistic anthropology and sociolinguistics that takes identity or ideology as its focus; however, we'll also read researchers from other fields who consider identity and/or ideology with the hope of applying their constructs to questions of language and linguistic practices.

Prerequisites

This course is an advanced graduate seminar, not an introductory course. Prerequisites include Permission of the instructor. "Introduction to Sociolinguistics" or "Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology" as well as at least one additional course in sociolinguistics or linguistic anthropology.

A willingness to read a lot of challenging material and to think hard about complex issues of language and society.

Please note that this course does NOT fulfill the FLE requirement for a course in quantitative research methodology.

Requirements

Presenting readings with a classmate one or more times, a course paper, and a twenty-minute conference-style presentation of your paper in class.

Texts

Bourdieu, Language as Symbolic Power
Kroskrity, Regimes of Language
Schieffelin et al. Language ideologies: Theory and Practice
and a packet of readings

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LIN 396-2: Intro to Graduate Linguistic Anthropology (Keating)

An Anthropology Core Course, this course is an introduction to the theoretical and methodological foundations of the study of language from a sociocultural perspective. Topics discussed include linguistic, philosophical, psychological, sociological and anthropological contributions to the understanding of verbal and non-verbal communication as a social activity embedded in cultural contexts. No prior training in linguistics is presupposed. Readings include both ethnographic studies and theoretical work about language.

Requirements

A seminar paper

Texts

TBA

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Courses | Resources

Spring 2003 Course Schedule | Linguistics Dept| UT-Austin


11/02/02

Comments to: linclass@www.utexas.edu