Embedded Systems - Shape The World

Course Code: UT.6.01x

Classes Start: 22 Jan 2014

Course Length: 15 weeks

Estimated effort: 10 hours per week

Prerequisites: Computer programming course in any language with exposure to variables, arithmetic, logic, loops, and functions. High school physics course covering current, voltage, resistance, and power.

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Build real-world embedded solutions using a bottom-up approach from simple to complex in this hands-on, lab-based course.


 

About this Course

How do they do it? If that is your reaction every time you see an electronic gadget you like, then wonder no more. Join us on a journey that will unravel how these electronic gadgets are designed, developed, and built as embedded systems that shape the world.

This is a hand-on, learn-by-doing course that shows you how to build solutions to real-world problems using embedded systems. Each student will purchase a Texas Instruments TM4C123 microcontroller kit and a few electronic components. This microcontroller has a state of the art ARM Cortex M4 processor. The course uses a bottom-up approach to problem-solving building gradually from simple interfacing of switches and LEDs to complex concepts like display drivers, digital to analog conversion, generation of sound, analog to digital conversion, graphics, interrupts, and communication. We will present both general principles and practical tips for building circuits and programming the microcontroller in the C programming language. You will develop debugging skills using oscilloscopes, logic analyzers, and software instrumentation. Laboratory assignments are first performed in simulation, and then you will build and debug your system on the real microcontroller. At the conclusion of this course you will be able to build your own arcade-style game.

We will provide instructions about purchasing the kit and installing required software at: http://users.ece.utexas.edu/~valvano/edX.

 

Faculty

Jonathan Valvano

Dr. Jon Valvano is a professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin and holds the Engineering Foundation Centennial Teaching Fellowship in Electrical Engineering. He received his S.B. and S.M. in Electrical and Computer Engineering from MIT in 1977 and his Ph.D. in 1981 from the joint Harvard-MIT program in Medical Engineering and Medical Physics. He joined the faculty at The University of Texas at Austin in 1981 and has 32 years of experience in teaching and research. He has received numerous teaching awards and authored five widely-used textbooks on embedded microcomputer systems. He has co-founded a successful medical device company called Admittance Technologies. His research involves integrated analog/digital processing, low-power design, medical instrumentation, and real-time systems.
Dr. Ramesh Terraballi Photo

Ramesh Yerraballi

Dr. Ramesh Yerraballi is a Senior Lecturer in the Departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Biomedical Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin. He received his Bachelors degree in Computer Science and Engineering from Osmania University, India and his PhD in Computer Science from Old Dominion University, Virginia. Dr. Yerraballi worked at Midwestern State University and The University of Texas at Arlington prior to joining UT Austin in 2008. His research interests are Real-Time Systems, Multimedia and Systems Security. He has taught a broad range of computing classes but currently focusses on Embedded Systems, Circuit Theory, Computer Architecture, Programming, and Statistics. He has taught at both the undergraduate and graduate levels and particularly enjoys teaching undergraduate students.