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DOCUMENTS OF THE GENERAL FACULTY

PROPOSED CHANGES FOR DEGREE REQUIREMENTS IN THE SCHOOL OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES IN THE COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES CHAPTER OF THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 1998-2000

Mary Ann Rankin, Dean of the College of Natural Sciences, filed with the Secretary of the Faculty Council the proposal below for changes in degree requirements in the School of Biological Sciences in the College of Natural Sciences chapter of The University of Texas at Austin Undergraduate Catalog, 1998-2000. The changes have been endorsed by the dean and were approved by the faculty and the Natural Sciences Course and Curriculum Committee. The edited proposal was received from the Office of Official Publications on January 27, 2000. The secretary has classified this proposal as legislation of exclusive application and primary interest to a single college or school.

If no objection is filed with the Office of the General Faculty by the date specified below, the legislation will be held to have been approved by the Faculty Council. If objection is filed within the prescribed period, the legislation will be presented to the Faculty Council at its next meeting. The objection, with reasons, must be signed by a member of the Faculty Council.

To be counted, a protest must be received in the Office of the General Faculty by March 24, 2000.


<signed>

John R. Durbin, Secretary
The Faculty Council




This legislation was posted on the Faculty Council web site (http://www.utexas.edu/faculty/council/) on February 28, 2000. Paper copies are available on request from the Office of the General Faculty, FAC 22, F9500. The no-protest deadline was extended form March 13, 2000 to March 24, 2000.


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PROPOSED CHANGES FOR DEGREE REQUIREMENTS IN THE SCHOOL OF
BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES IN THE COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES CHAPTER
OF THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 1998-2000


On pages 377-379, in the section "DEPARTMENTAL HONORS PROGRAMS," make the following changes.

BIOLOGY HONORS PROGRAM

[Candidates for special honors in biology should apply to the honors adviser in one of the three biological science departments for admission to the honors program no later than the semester or summer session preceding the last year. A University grade point average of at least 3.00 and a grade point average in biological science of at least 3.50 are required for admission. The requirements for graduation with special honors, which are in addition to the usual requirements of the major, are (1) Botany 679H, Microbiology 679H, or Zoology 679H, Honors Tutorial Course; (2) satisfactory performance on a comprehensive honors examination in one of the three departments, an acceptable thesis based on original experimentation, or an acceptable score on the Advanced Biology Test of the Graduate Record Examinations; (3) a University grade point average of at least 3.00 and a grade point average in biological science of at least 3.50; and (4) completion at the University of at least sixty semester hours of coursework counted toward the degree.]

Students who plan to seek special honors in biology should apply to the honors adviser in the School of Biological Sciences for admission to the honors program no later than the beginning of their senior year. A University grade point average of at least 3.00 and a grade point average in biology of at least 3.50 are required for admission. The requirements for graduation with special honors, which are in addition to the usual requirements of the major, are (1) Biology 679H or two semesters of Biology 379H, Honors Tutorial Course; (2) a thesis or presentation based on original research and approved by the supervising faculty member and the honors adviser; honors students in the human biology option must select both a thesis supervisor and a second reader, one of whom must be a tenure-track faculty member or senior lecturer in the School of Biological Sciences; (3) a University grade point average of at least 3.00 and a grade point average in biology of at least 3.50; and (4) completion at the University of at least sixty semester hours of coursework counted toward the degree.

[BOTANY HONORS PROGRAM

Majors who are candidates for special honors in botany should apply to the honors adviser for admission to the honors program upon completion of eighteen semester hours of botany or biology, including at least five hours chosen from Biology 302, 303, 304, 205, and 206. A University grade point average of at least 3.00 and a grade point average in biology or botany of at least 3.50 are required for admission. The requirements for graduation with special honors, which are in addition to the usual requirements of the major, are (1) Botany 679H, Honors Tutorial Course; (2) satisfactory performance on a comprehensive honors examination; (3) a University grade point average of at least 3.00 and a grade point average in botany or biology of at least 3.50; and (4) completion at the University of at least sixty semester hours of coursework counted toward the degree.]

[MICROBIOLOGY HONORS PROGRAM

Majors wishing to qualify for special honors in microbiology should apply to the honors adviser for admission to the honors program upon completion of twelve semester hours of microbiology and eight semester hours of organic chemistry and no later than the beginning of the senior year. A University grade point average of at least 3.00 and a grade point average in microbiology and chemistry of at least 3.50 are required for admission. The requirements for graduation with special honors, which are in addition to the usual


276


requirements of the major, are (1) Microbiology 679H, Honors Tutorial Course, and at least three semester hours of biochemistry or an acceptable substitute; (2) an acceptable thesis or presentation based on experimental work; (3) a University grade point average of at least 3.00 and a grade point average in microbiology and chemistry of at least 3.50; and (4) completion at the University of at least sixty semester hours of coursework counted toward the degree.]

[ZOOLOGY HONORS PROGRAM

Majors who are candidates for special honors in zoology should apply to the honors adviser for admission to the honors program no later than the semester or summer session preceding the last year. A University grade point average of at least 3.00 and a grade point average in biological science of at least 3.50 are required for admission. The requirements for graduation with special honors, which are in addition to the requirements of the major, are (1) Zoology 679H, Honors Tutorial Course, a research project, with a grade of A; (2) an acceptable score on a comprehensive honors examination, which is either the Advanced Biology Test of the Graduate Record Examinations, to be taken in the last semester of the last year, or another suitable comprehensive examination approved by the honors adviser; (3) a University grade point average of at least 3.00 and a grade point average in biological science of at least 3.50; and (4) completion at the University of at least sixty semester hours of coursework counted toward the degree.]

Justification:
Due to the reorganization of the School of Biological Sciences, departments have been merged into new academic groups. New degree plans and options have been designed to reflect these changes.


On page 384, in the section "BACHELOR OF ARTS, PLAN I," subsection "MAJORS AND MINORS," make the following changes.

Biology

[The biology degree program is offered by the Division of Biological Sciences. Students electing this degree program must complete Biology 302, 303, and 304 and one of the following introductory laboratory courses: Biology 205, 206, 208, and 309H

Major: In addition to the biology courses listed above, the student must complete twenty-four semester hours of upper-division coursework, consisting of


1.


2.
Botany 323K or Zoology 320.
3.
Zoology 325.
4.
Botany 328 or Microbiology 362 or Zoology 321 or 361K, or both Zoology 365L and 365N.
5.
Courses chosen from the following list. Courses marked with an asterisk are lecture courses that require concurrent enrollment in a laboratory course or courses that contain a substantial laboratory component. Courses marked with a dagger are offered infrequently.
a.
Biology 331* or Botany 331.*
b.
Botany 320 and 120C,* 321 and 121C,* 323L,* 327 and 127K,* 328 and 128K,* 343M, 349, 350M, 351, 352, 262 and 262C,* 362L, 462M,* 365M and 165N,* 367K, 370M, 373K and 173L,* 374 and 174K,* and 474L.*
c.
Chemistry 339K and 339L, or 369.
d.
Marine Science 352C, 352D, 354, 354C, and 354E.
e.
Microbiology 321,* 322 and 122K,* 330 and 130K, 331, 332, 335, 342, 360 and 160K, 361, 361K,* 362, 363, 366, 368,* and 369.
f.
Zoology 321, 322K, 325L, 328K, 432,* 333,* 334C, 436,* 440,* 341K, 346,* 351, 453,* 354, 357, 359, 361K, 362, 365L and 265P, 365N and 265P, 369,* 370K, 371L, 373, 476C,* and 478C.


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Three hours of undergraduate research or special studies courses in either botany, microbiology, or zoology may be counted toward the twenty-four hours in the major. Another three hours of special studies courses may be counted as elective hours.

The student must complete at least five semester hours of coursework in residence in each of the departments of the Division of Biological Sciences (botany, microbiology, and zoology). He or she must also complete at least three laboratory courses from at least two of the three departments. A grade of at least C is required in all courses taken at the University and counted toward the major requirement.

Minor for biology majors: General chemistry and organic chemistry (Chemistry 610A, 610B, and 210C; or 618A, 118K, 618B, and 118L); and at least six semester hours of mathematics, or six semester hours of computer sciences, or eight semester hours of physics (Physics 302K, 302L, 102M, and 102N; or 317K, 317L, 117M, and 117N; or the equivalent).]

In addition to the major requirements below, the student must complete the following: Biology 211, 212, 213, 214, and 325; Biology 205L, 206L, 208L, or 309H; and Chemistry 301. The student must complete these courses before taking further upper-division coursework in biology. Biology majors must also complete Mathematics 305G and 408C; Chemistry 302 and 204; and one of the following: (1) Chemistry 610A, 610B, and 210C; (2) eight hours of coursework in physics, including laboratory work; or (3) six hours of coursework in computer sciences, including at least three hours of upper-division work.

Major: Twenty-one semester hours of coursework, including at least three hours in each of the following areas; no course may be counted toward more than one area.

1.
Cellular, developmental, and molecular biology: Biology 320, 323L, 325L, 325T, 326D, 326E, 226R, 126L, 226T, 327, 127L, 330, 130L, 331L, 332, 333, 335, 336, 337G, 337J, 339, 339M, 343M, 344, 347, 349, 350M, 360K, 160L, 366, 366R, 367, 368L, 379G, 379J.
2.
Physiology, neurobiology, and behavior: Biology 322, 122L, 226S, 328, 128L, 329, 129L, 338L, 339, 341, 141L, 345, 359J, 359K, 359R, 360K, 160L, 361, 361L, 361T, 365L, 465M, 365N, 365R, 365S, 365T, 365W, 371L, 371M.
3.
Ecology and evolution: Biology 321L, 226S, 340L, 342L, 448L, 351, 352, 353L, 354L, 455L, 456L, 357, 458L, 359, 359J, 262, 262L, 363, 364, 369L, 370, 371G, 472L, 373, 373L, 375, 376, Marine Science 352C, 354Q.
4.
Animal biology: Biology 321L, 338L, 340L, 448L, 353L, 354L, 455L, 359K, 359R, 361T, 369L, 478L, Marine Science 354, 354C.
5.
Plant biology: Biology 322, 122L, 324 and 124L, 327 and 127L, 328, 128L, 351, 352, 262, 262L, 363, 472L, 374 and 174L, Marine Science 352D.

6.

Microbiology: Biology 126L, 226R, 226S, 226T, 327, 127L, 329, 129L, 330, 130L, 333, 339, 341, 141L, 364, Marine Science 354E.

To provide twenty-one semester hours in the major, the student must complete three additional hours of coursework chosen from the following: the biology and marine science courses listed in areas 1 through 6 above; other upper-division biology courses; Chemistry 339K and 339L, or 369. The twenty-one hours in the major must include at least three laboratory courses. They may include three hours in undergraduate research or special studies courses. Another three hours in special studies courses may be counted as electives. The student must earn a grade of at least C in each course taken at the University and counted toward the major requirement.


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[Botany

Major: Botany 320 and 120C, 321 and 121C, 328 and 128K, 374 and 174K, 419 or 262 and 262C, Zoology 325, and two additional courses in botany, one of which may be Botany 377. A grade of at least C is required in all courses taken at the University and counted toward the major requirement.

Minor for botany majors: Sixteen semester hours of chemistry, including Chemistry 610A, 610B, and 210C, or their equivalents.

Additional electives in anthropology, chemistry, geography, geological sciences, marine science, mathematics, microbiology, physics, or zoology are recommended.]

Justification:
BA Biology - a broad-based degree that is very similar to the current BA Biology (1284 declared BA majors in fall 1998), often chosen by students pursuing study for the health professions, and has similar life science requirements to the current BA Botany and BA Zoology.

Justification:
Due to the reorganization of the School of Biological Sciences, departments have been merged into new academic groups. New degree plans and options have been designed to reflect these changes.


On page 385, in the section "BACHELOR OF ARTS, PLAN I," subsection "MAJORS AND MINORS," make the following changes.

[Microbiology

Microbiology majors must take eight semester hours of organic chemistry, Chemistry 369 or the equivalent, Mathematics 408C or the equivalent, and Physics 302K, 302L, 102M, and 102N or the equivalent.

Major: Biology 302 and twenty-four semester hours of microbiology, including at least two laboratory courses (or courses that include laboratories) beyond Microbiology 129K. Biology 303 is also recommended. At least sixteen of the twenty-four semester hours of microbiology must be in upper-division courses. A grade of at least C is required in microbiology courses counted toward the major requirement. Up to six hours of special studies in advanced microbiology (Microbiology 279, 379, 679) may be taken, three hours of which may, with the approval of the department chairman, be counted toward the twenty-four-hour major requirement.]

Justification:
Due to the reorganization of the School of Biological Sciences, departments have been merged into new academic groups. New degree plans and options have been designed to reflect these changes.


On page 386, in the section ""BACHELOR OF ARTS, PLAN I," subsection "MAJORS AND MINORS," make the following changes.

[Zoology

Zoology majors must take eight semester hours of organic chemistry (either Chemistry 610A, 610B, and 210C; or 618A, 118K, 618B, and 118L), Mathematics 408C, and either Mathematics 408D or one of the following courses: Mathematics 316, Psychology 317, and Sociology 317L. Only Mathematics 408D may be taken on the pass/fail basis; all other courses used to fulfill the chemistry and mathematics/statistics requirements must be taken for a letter grade. Courses taken in departments outside the College of Natural Sciences to fulfill the mathematics/statistics requirement may not also be used to fulfill the Area B requirement.


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Major: Thirty-six semester hours, consisting of

1.
Biology 302, 303, and 304; or the equivalent.
2.
At least twenty-four hours of upper-division zoology, including at least one course in each of the following areas:
a.
Cell biology: Zoology 320, or 326K and 326L.
b.
Developmental biology: Zoology 321.
c.
Genetics: Zoology 325 (taken alone or concurrently with Zoology 325L).
d.
Structure/function of whole organisms and phylogeny: Zoology 432, 333, 436, 442C, 346, 453, or 370C.
e.
Physiology: Zoology 351; 361K; or 365L and 365N, preferably with 265P; or 371L and 365N, preferably with 265P.
f.
Ecology: Zoology 440, 354, 357, 369, 370C (Topic: Behavioral Ecology), or 370K.
3.
One of the following courses: Botany 419, 320, 321, 323L, 331, Computer Sciences 304P, Geological Sciences 401, 303, 405, Microbiology 226, 227 or 228, 368, Physics 302K, 302L, 317K, 317L. A course in physics is recommended.

At least four courses in the Division of Biological Sciences must include laboratory work. Of these four laboratory courses, two must be in zoology and only one may be lower-division. The laboratory courses must be chosen from Biology 205, 206, 208, Botany 323L, 331, Microbiology 368, Zoology 325L, 432, 333, 436, 440, 442C, 346, 453, 265P, 369.

A grade of at least C is required in all courses counted toward the major requirement.]

Justification:
Due to the reorganization of the School of Biological Sciences, departments have been merged into new academic groups. New degree plans and options have been designed to reflect these changes.


On pages 387-391, in the section "DEGREES," make the following changes.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOLOGY

[Many current areas in the study of biological systems require broadly based training that transcends the classical boundaries of biology. A student interested in specializing in one of these interdisciplinary areas should take courses both in biology and in sciences that complement biology. The Bachelor of Science in Biology degree program offers three areas of specialization: molecular biology; ecology, evolution, and conservation biology; and a teaching option. For a molecular biology concentration a strong background in chemistry, physics, mathematics, and, often, computer sciences is recommended. The program leading to the Bachelor of Science in Biology is based on that for the Bachelor of Arts but allows the student to take more hours in science in a more broadly based program of study and gives additional direction to the student in pursuit of these studies. The Bachelor of Science in Biology is intended primarily for students who plan to continue with graduate work in biology or a related area or to enter the teaching profession.

OPTION I: MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

PRESCRIBED WORK

1.
English 306 and 316K. In addition, in taking courses to fulfill other degree requirements, the student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component; one of these courses must be upper-division. If the writing requirement is not fulfilled by courses specified for the degree, the student must fulfill it either with electives or with coursework taken in addition to the number of hours


280


  required for the degree. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.
2.
Proficiency in a single foreign language equivalent to that shown by completion of three semesters of college coursework. For students who enter the University with fewer than two high school units in a single foreign language, the first two semesters in a language may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree.
3.
Six semester hours of American government, including Texas government.
4.
Six semester hours of American history.
5.
Three semester hours in anthropology, economics, geography, linguistics, psychology, or sociology.
6.
Mathematics 408C and 408D. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 or 304E without degree credit to remove their deficiency.
7.
Three semester hours in architecture, art (including art history, design, studio art, visual art studies), classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts, music (including music, instruments, ensemble), philosophy (excluding courses in logic), or theatre and dance.
8.
Chemistry 301, 302, 204 or 317, and either 610A, 610B, and 210C, or 618A, 118K, 618B, and 118L.
9.
Six semester hours of physical chemistry chosen from Chemistry 353, 354, 354L, and 370.
10.
Physics 301, 101L, 316, and 116L; Physics 303K, 103M, 303L, and 103N; or Physics 317K, 117M, 317L, and 117N.
11.
Thirty-eight semester hours of coursework, consisting of (a) Biology 302, 303, and 304; (b) Microbiology 226, 227 or 228, and 129K; (c) Botany 323K or Zoology 320; (d) Zoology 321; (e) Zoology 322K; (f) Botany 331, Microbiology 368, or Chemistry 370; (g) Zoology 325; (h) Botany 367K, Microbiology 366, or Zoology 362; (i) Chemistry 339K; (j) Chemistry 339L or Microbiology 362.
12.
Two additional courses, one of which must include substantial laboratory work, chosen from the following: Biology 331* or Botany 331,* Botany 323L,* 328 and 128K,* 343M, 350M, Botany 370M or Zoology 370K, Chemistry 369L,* 370, Microbiology 330 and 130K, 331, 335, 342, 360 and 160K, 366, 368,* 369, Zoology 328K, 351, 362, 373, and 476C.* Courses marked with an asterisk are lecture courses that require concurrent enrollment in a laboratory course or courses that contain substantial laboratory work. Students may count three semester hours of special studies research courses in a molecular biology laboratory (Botany 377, Microbiology 379, Zoology 371K, or Chemistry 369K) toward this requirement.
13.
Of the courses chosen to fulfill requirements 11 and 12, at least one course must be taken in residence in each of the departments in the Division of Biological Sciences (botany, microbiology, and zoology).
14.
Thirty-six semester hours of upper-division coursework, of which at least eighteen hours must be in the biological sciences.
15.
At least eighteen semester hours of upper-division coursework, including at least twelve hours of upper-division coursework in biological sciences, must be completed in residence at the University.
16.
Enough additional coursework to make a total of 130 semester hours.

 

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS

The student must fulfill the University-wide graduation requirements given on pages 16-17 and the college requirements given on page 379. He or she must also make a grade of at least C in each course used to fulfill requirements 11 and 12 of the prescribed work above.

OPTION II: ECOLOGY, EVOLUTION, AND CONSERVATION BIOLOGY

PRESCRIBED WORK

1.
English 306 and 316K. In addition, in taking courses to fulfill other degree requirements, the student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component; one of these courses must be upper-division. If the writing requirement is not fulfilled by courses specified for the degree, the


281


student must fulfill it either with electives or with coursework taken in addition to the number of hours required for the degree. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.
2.
Proficiency in a single foreign language equivalent to that shown by the completion of four semesters of college coursework. Spanish or another language useful for fieldwork is recommended. For students who enter the University with fewer than two high school units in a single foreign language, the first two semesters in a language may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree.
3.
Six semester hours of American government, including Texas government.
4.
Six semester hours of American history.
5.
Six semester hours in anthropology, economics, geography, psychology, or sociology chosen from the following courses: Anthropology 301, 302, 318L, Economics 304K, 304L, Geography 301C, 301K, 308, 312, 326K, 328C, 331K, 334, 334C, 334K, 335C, 335K, 339, 339K, 342C, 346, 350L, 351, 356, 357, 360G, 360L, 362K, 366K, 367K, 372K, Psychology 301, 317, Sociology 302, 317L, 319, 369K.
6.
Three semester hours in architecture, art (including art history, design, studio art, visual art studies), classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts, music (including music, instruments, ensemble), philosophy (excluding courses in logic), or theatre and dance.
7.
Mathematics 408C and 408D. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 or 304E without degree credit to remove their deficiency.
8.
Either (1) one of the following sequences: Physics 317K, 317L, 117M, and 117N; Physics 301, 101L, 316, and 116L; or Physics 303K, 303L, 103M, and 103N; or (2) Physics 302K, 302L, 102M, 102N, and either Mathematics 340L or a three-semester-hour mathematics course for which Mathematics 408D is a prerequisite. The same mathematics course may be used to fulfill both this requirement and requirement 10 below.
9.
Chemistry 301, 302, and 204.
10.
Chemistry 610A, 610B, and 210C; or at least six semester hours chosen from the following courses:
a.
Mathematics 316.
b.
Mathematics 340L or mathematics courses for which Mathematics 408D is a prerequisite.
c.
Physics 315 and 115L, and upper-division physics courses other than Physics 341.
d.
Computer sciences courses. Only one introductory computer language course may be counted toward requirement 10.
e.
Geological Sciences 401 or 303 or 312K, and other geological sciences courses that may be counted toward a major in geological sciences.
f.
Civil Engineering 311S, 341, 346K, 369L, and 370K.

The courses used to fulfill requirements 7, 8, 9, and 10 must provide at least thirty semester hours of credit.

11.
Biology 302, 303, 304, 208, and Zoology 325.
12.
At least one course or sequence of courses chosen from each of the following areas:
a.
Ecology: Botany 373K, Marine Science 440, 352C, Microbiology 363, Zoology 440, 357, and 369.
b.
Evolution: Botany 370M, Zoology 442C, and Zoology 370K.
c.
Upper-division courses in applied ecology, such as Botany 375C, Marine Science 354Q, and Zoology 370C (Topic 2: Conservation Biology).
d.
Biological diversity: Botany 321 and 121C, 327 and 127K, 262, Marine Science 352D, 354, 354C, 354E, Microbiology 321, Zoology 432, 333, 334C, 436, 346, and 453.
e.
Cellular/molecular/physiological/developmental biology: Microbiology 226 and 129K, 227, 228, Botany 320 and 120C, 323K, 328 and 128K, Zoology 320, 321, 322K, 326K and326L, 351, 361K, and 362.
f.
An additional course chosen from items a through d; or an advanced evolution course chosen from Botany 352 and 362L; or an animal behavior course chosen from Zoology 354 and 370C (Topic: Behavioral Ecology); or Zoology 478C.


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13.
An upper-division field course or equivalent experience is required. The student may satisfy this requirement by taking a field course; by taking two upper-division biology courses with substantial field components; or by completing an appropriate, supervised research project, an appropriate internship, or an equivalent experience designed by the student and approved by the academic adviser.
14.
At least thirty-six semester hours of upper-division coursework, of which at least eighteen must be in biological sciences.
15.
Of the courses used to fulfill requirement 12, at least one must be taken in residence from two of the three departments of the Division of Biological Sciences. Special studies research courses in botany, microbiology, and zoology may not be counted as the only course in residence in a department.
16.
At least three organized courses in addition to Biology 208 must contain a substantial laboratory or field component.
17.
Enough additional coursework to make a total of 130 semester hours.

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS

The student must fulfill the University-wide graduation requirements given on pages 16-17 and the college requirements given on page 379. He or she must also earn a grade of at least C in each course used to fulfill requirements 11 and 12 of the prescribed work above.

OPTION III: TEACHING

This program is designed to fulfill the course requirements for certification as a secondary school teacher inTexas, but completion of the program does not guarantee the student’s certification. For information about additional certification requirements, see chapter 5 of this catalog and consult the University’s teacher certification officer in the College of Education.

SEQUENCE A: COMPOSITE TEACHING FIELD: SCIENCE

Completion of this program usually requires 126 to 149 semester hours of coursework.

Prescribed Work

1.
English 306, 316K, and three additional semester hours in English; English 309K or 309L is recommended. In addition, in taking courses to fulfill other degree requirements, the student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component; one of these courses must be upper-division. The additional required course(s) in English may be counted toward this requirement if certified to contain a substantial writing component. If the writing requirement is not fulfilled by courses specified for the degree, the student must fulfill it either with electives or with coursework taken in addition to the number of hours required for the degree. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.
2.
Proficiency in a single foreign language equivalent to that shown by completion of courses 506, 507, and either 310K or 312K. For students who enter the University with fewer than two high school units in a single foreign language, the first two semesters in a language may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree.
3.
Six semester hours of American government, including Texas government.
4.
Six semester hours of American history.
5.
Three semester hours in anthropology, economics, geography, linguistics, psychology, or sociology. Psychology 301 is highly recommended.
6.
Mathematics 408C; and Mathematics 408D, 316, or Computer Sciences 304P. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 or 304E without degree credit to remove their deficiency.


283


7.
Three semester hours in architecture, art (including art history, design, studio art, visual art studies), classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts, music (including music, instruments, ensemble), philosophy (excluding courses in logic), or theatre and dance.
8.
Six semester hours in human development, consisting of one course from each of the following groups:
a.
Child Development 313, Educational Psychology 332, 363M (Topic 3: Adolescent Development), Psychology 304, 309, 333D, or 339.
b.
Applied Learning and Development 322 or Psychology 345.
9.
Eighteen semester hours in education: Curriculum and Instruction 331C, 332S, 667S (Student Teaching in Secondary Schools: Science), 370S (Topic 2: Science), and 371 (Topic 18: Critical Issues in Schooling).
10.
Documented evidence of proficiency in oral communication. Proficiency is assessed in Curriculum and Instruction 332S. Students who lack proficiency must take Speech 305, 319, Theatre and Dance 303, 303C, or 326.
11.
Documented evidence of proficiency in computing or credit for three semester hours in computer sciences, data processing, management information systems, or coursework intended to provide computer literacy. This requirement is fulfilled by completion of Biology 208.
12.
Biology 302, 303, 304, and one laboratory course chosen from Biology 205, 206, and 208.4
13.
The following courses:
a.
Microbiology 226, 227 or 228, and 129K.
b.
Botany 323K or Zoology 320.
c.
Zoology 325.
d.
One of the following: Botany 328, Marine Science 354S, Microbiology 362, Zoology 321, 361K, or both Zoology 365L and 365N.
e.
Botany 321 and 121C, or 320 and 120C.
f.
One of the following: Botany 373K, Marine Science 352C, 353 (Topic 6: Marine Ecology), 354E, Microbiology 363, Zoology 357, 369.
g.
An additional upper-division course in botany, microbiology, or zoology that includes a laboratory, or an upper-division course in one of these fields and a freshman-level laboratory course in biology.
14.
Chemistry 301, 302, 204, 610A, 610B, and 210C.
15.
Physics 302K, 102M, 302L, and 102N; or any eight-semester-hour calculus-based physics sequence.
16.
Six semester hours of approved coursework in geological sciences.

Special Requirements

The student must fulfill the University-wide graduation requirements given on pages 16-17 and the college requirements given on page 379. He or she must also make a grade of at least C in each course used to fulfill requirements 13 through 16 of the prescribed work above. For additional teacher certification requirements, see chapter 5 of this catalog and consult the University’s teacher certification officer in the College of Education.

footnote:

14.
Biology 208 fulfills the computer proficiency requirement. It is normally certified as a substantial writing component course.

SEQUENCE B: TWO TEACHING FIELDS: BIOLOGY AND CHEMISTRY

Completion of this program usually requires 124 to 148 semester hours of coursework.

Prescribed Work

1.
English 306, 316K, and three additional semester hours in English; English 309K or 309L is recommended. In addition, in taking courses to fulfill other degree requirements, the student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component; one of these courses must be upper-division. The additional required course(s) in English may be counted toward this requirement if


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certified to contain a substantial writing component. If the writing requirement is not fulfilled by courses specified for the degree, the student must fulfill it either with electives or with coursework taken in addition to the number of hours required for the degree. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule
2.
Proficiency in a single foreign language equivalent to that shown by completion of courses 506, 507, and either 310K or 312K. For students who enter the University with fewer than two high school units in a single foreign language, the first two semesters in a language may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree.
3.
Six semester hours of American government, including Texas government.
4.
Six semester hours of American history.
5.
Three semester hours in anthropology, economics, geography, linguistics, psychology, or sociology. Psychology 301 is highly recommended.
6.
Mathematics 408C; and Mathematics 408D, 316, or Computer Sciences 304P. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 or 304E without degree credit to remove their deficiency.
7.
Three semester hours in architecture, art (including art history, design, studio art, visual art studies), classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts, music (including music, instruments, ensemble), philosophy (excluding courses in logic), or theatre and dance.
8.
Six semester hours in human development, consisting of one course from each of the following groups:
a.
Child Development 313, Educational Psychology 332, 363M (Topic 3: Adolescent Development), Psychology 304, 309, 333D, or 339.
b.
Applied Learning and Development 322 or Psychology 345.
9.
Eighteen semester hours in education: Curriculum and Instruction 331C, 332S, 667S (Student Teaching in Secondary Schools: Science), 370S (Topic 2: Science), and 371 (Topic 18: Critical Issues in Schooling).
10.
Documented evidence of proficiency in oral communication. Proficiency is assessed in Curriculum and Instruction 332S. Students who lack proficiency must take Speech 305, 319, or Theatre and Dance 303, 303C, or 326.
11.
Documented evidence of proficiency in computing or credit for three semester hours in computer sciences, data processing, management information systems, or coursework intended to provide computer literacy. This requirement is fulfilled by completion of Biology 208.
12.
Biology 302, 303, 304, and one laboratory course chosen from Biology 205, 206, and 208.4
13.
The following courses:
a.
Microbiology 226, 227 or 228, and 129K.
b.
Botany 323K or Zoology 320.
c.
Zoology 325.
d.
One of the following: Botany 328, Microbiology 362, Zoology 321, 361K, or both Zoology 365L and 365N.
e.
Botany 321 and 121C, or 320 and 120C.
f.
One of the following: Botany 373K, Marine Science 352C, 353 (Topic 6: Marine Ecology), 354E, Microbiology 363, Zoology 357, 369.
g.
An additional upper-division course in botany, microbiology, or zoology that includes a laboratory, or an upper-division course in one of these fields and a freshman-level laboratory course in biology.
14.
Chemistry 301, 302, 204, 610A, 610B, 210C, and twelve semester hours chosen from Chemistry 339K, 339L, 341, 353, 153K, 455, 367L, and 370.

Special Requirements

The student must fulfill the University-wide graduation requirements given on pages 16-17 and the college requirements given on page 379. He or she must also make a grade of at least C in each course used to fulfill requirements 13 and 14 of the prescribed work above. For additional teacher certification requirements, see chapter 5 of this catalog and consult the University’s teacher certification officer in the College of Education.]


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The Bachelor of Science in Biology degree program offers eight options: ecology, evolution, and behavior; human biology; marine and freshwater biology; microbiology; cell and molecular biology; neurobiology; plant biology; and a teaching option. The options have certain prescribed work in common, and each option has additional requirements. Many fields in the study of biological systems require broadly based training that transcends the classical boundaries of biology. In planning a program of work to meet his or her degree requirements, a student interested in specializing in these interdisciplinary areas should choose courses both in biology and in sciences that complement biology. Students who plan to complete the program within four years will have little flexibility in course selection unless they plan a schedule in advance. See "Order and Choice of Work" below for more information.

PRESCRIBED WORK COMMON TO ALL OPTIONS

1.
Rhetoric and Composition 306 and English 316K. In addition, in taking courses to fulfill other degree requirements, the student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component; one of these courses must be upper-division. If the writing requirement is not fulfilled by courses specified for the degree, the student must fulfill it either with electives or with coursework taken in addition to the number of hours required for the degree. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.
2.
Proficiency in a foreign language equivalent to that shown by completion of course 506. This requirement may be fulfilled by credit by examination; it may not be fulfilled by coursework taken on the pass/fail basis. Students who follow the teaching option are exempt from this requirement.1
          Students who enter the University with fewer than two high school units in a single foreign language must take the first two semesters in a language without degree credit to remove their foreign language deficiency.
3.
Six semester hours of American government, including Texas government.
4.
Six semester hours of American history.
5.
Three semester hours in anthropology, economics, geography, linguistics, psychology, or sociology.
6.
Three semester hours in architecture, art (including art history, design, studio art, visual art studies), classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts, music (including music, instruments, ensemble), philosophy (excluding courses in logic), or theatre and dance.
7.
Mathematics 408C and 408D. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 without degree credit to remove their deficiency.
8.
An eight-hour sequence of coursework in physics chosen from the following: Physics 301, 101L, 316, and 116L; 317K, 117M, 317L, and 117N; 303K, 103M, 303L, and 103N. Students in the ecology, evolution, and behavior, human biology, marine and freshwater biology, microbiology, and teaching options may substitute Physics 302K, 102M, 302L, and 102N.
9.
Chemistry 301, 302, and 204.
10.
Biology 211, 212, 213, 214, and 325, with a grade of at least C in each. These courses must be completed before students progress to other upper-division biology courses.

11.

At least thirty-six semester hours of upper-division coursework, of which at least twenty-four semester hours must be in biology or in the marine science courses listed below. The student must earn a grade of at least C in each course. These upper-division courses must include at least one different course and at least three hours of coursework in each of the following three areas:


1 Correction made 3/1/2000, per email message received from Laura Kobler, Official Publications.

 


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a.
Cellular, developmental, and molecular biology: Biology 320, 323L, 325L, 325T, 326D, 326E, 126L, 226R, 226T, 327, 127L, 330, 130L, 331L, 332, 333, 335, 336, 337G, 337J, 339, 339M, 343M, 344, 347, 349, 350M, 360K, 160L, 366, 366R, 367, 368L, 379G, 379J.
b.
Physiology, neurobiology, and behavior: Biology 322, 122L, 226S, 328, 128L, 329, 129L, 338L, 339, 341, 141L, 345, 359J, 359K, 359R, 360K, 160L, 361, 361L, 361T, 365L, 465M, 365N, 365R, 365S, 365T, 365W, 371L, 371M.
c.
Ecology and evolution: Biology 321L, 226S, 340L, 342L, 448L, 351, 352, 353L, 354L, 455L, 456L, 357, 458L, 359, 359J, 262, 262L, 363, 364, 369L, 370, 371G, 472L, 373, 373L, 375, 376, Marine Science 352C, 354Q.
12.
The student must complete at least four laboratory courses in biology with a grade of at least C. Three of these courses must be upper-division.
13.
At least eighteen semester hours of upper-division coursework in biology must be completed in residence at the University.
14.
Enough additional coursework to make a total of at least 126 semester hours.

ADDITIONAL PRESCRIBED WORK FOR EACH OPTION

OPTION I: ECOLOGY, EVOLUTION, AND BEHAVIOR

15.
Biology 318M and three hours of coursework chosen from the following: Chemistry 610A, 610B, and 210C; computer sciences courses other than Computer Sciences 303E; Geological Sciences 401, 303, 312K, and geological sciences courses that may be counted toward the requirements for a major in geological sciences; Mathematics 316, 340L, and mathematics courses for which Mathematics 408D is a prerequisite; Physics 315 and 115L, and upper-division physics courses other than Physics 341.
16.
In fulfilling requirement 11 above, the student must complete at least twenty-seven semester hours chosen from the following coursework, including at least three hours in each of the following areas:
a.
Ecology: Biology 456L, 357, 364, 373, 373L, 375, Marine Science 352C, 354Q.
b.
Evolution: Biology 370.
c.
Cellular, developmental, and molecular biology: Biology 320, 323L, 325L, 325T, 326D, 326E, 126L, 226R, 226T, 327, 127L, 330, 130L, 331L, 332, 333, 335, 336, 337G, 337J, 339, 339M, 343M, 344, 347, 349, 350M, 360K, 160L, 366, 366R, 367, 368L, 379G, 379J.
 
d.
Physiology, neurobiology, and behavior: Biology 322, 122L, 226S, 328, 128L, 329, 129L, 338L, 339, 341, 141L, 345, 359J, 359K, 359R, 360K, 160L, 361, 361L, 361T, 365L, 465M, 365N, 365R, 365S, 365T, 365W, 371L, 371M.
e.
Taxon-based diversity courses: Biology 321L, 324 and 124L, 327 and 127L, 340L, 341, 141L, 448L, 353L, 354L, 455L, 262, 262L, 369L, 472L, 478L, Marine Science 352D, 354, 354C, 354E.
17.
One of the four laboratory courses used to fulfill requirement 12 must have a field component. The following courses may be used: Biology 321L, 340L, 342L, 353L, 455L, 456L, Marine Science 352D, 354, 354C.

OPTION II: HUMAN BIOLOGY

15.
At least six hours of coursework chosen from the following: Biology 318M; Chemistry 610A, 610B, and 210C; computer sciences courses other than Computer Sciences 303E; Geological Sciences 401, 303, 312K, and geological sciences courses that may be counted toward the requirements for a major in geological sciences; Mathematics 316, 340L, and mathematics courses for which Mathematics 408D is a prerequisite; Physics 315 and 115L, and upper-division physics courses other than Physics 341.
16.
In fulfilling requirement 11 above, the student must complete Biology 346, at least six hours in area a below, and at least three hours each in areas b through e.


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a.
Cellular and molecular biology: Biology 320, 323L, 326D, 326E, 344.
b.
Anatomy: Anthropology 432L, Biology 478L, Kinesiology 324K.
c.
Physiology: Biology 361T, 365L, 365R, 365S, 371M.
d.
Behavior and psychology: Anthropology 323K, 350M, Biology 359K, 359R, Psychology 332, 333.
e.
Evolution and ecology: Anthropology 348, Biology 357, 364, 370, 373, 373L.1
17.
In fulfilling requirement 11 above, the student must complete at least fifteen hours of coursework, including at least nine hours of upper-division work, in one of the following concentrations.
a.
Cellular, molecular, and developmental biology: Biology 126L, 226R, 330, 331L, 332, 339M, 345, 349, 365N, 366R, 379J.
b.
Genetics and biotechnology: Biology 325L, 325T, 126L, 226R, 226T, 335, 347, 366, 366R, 379G, 379J.
c.
Pathogenesis and immunity: Biology 126L, 226R, 226T, 329, 129L, 330, 130L, 336, 341, 141L, 347, 360K, 160L, 361, 361L, 365T.
d.
Social aspects of health and disease: Sociology 330C, 354K, and nine hours chosen from the following: Chemical Engineering 357, Geography 357, Human Development and Family Sciences 313, 372K, Humanities 101, Nursing 310, 347 (Topic: Death and Dying), 347 (Topic: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on AIDS), Philosophy 325M.
e.
Problems of developing countries: Biology 351, Economics 333K,2 Geography 326K, 339K, 342C, 346, 356, 357, 358, Sociology 319, 324K, 346.
f.
Human impact on the environment: Biology 359, 373, 373L,1 Civil Engineering 357, Geography 326K, 334, 339K, 346, Philosophy 325C, Sociology 319.
g.
Urban planning and development: Civil Engineering 357, Community and Regional Planning 369K, Economics 334K,2 Government 358, Geography 315, 337, 358, Humanities 101, Sociology 319, 346.
18.
Biology 170C, completed on the pass/fail basis in the student’s senior year. In this conference course, students meet for one hour a week to summarize their work in their concentrations.

footnotes:

1.
Biology 373 and 373L may not be counted toward both requirement 16e and requirement 17f.
2.
Economics 304K and 304L are prerequisites to this course. One of them may be counted toward requirement 5 of the prescribed work.

OPTION III: MARINE AND FRESHWATER BIOLOGY

15.
In fulfilling requirement 12 above, the student must complete Biology 205L, 206L, 208L, or 309H.
16.
Biology 318M.
17.
Chemistry 610A, 610B, and 210C.
18.
Eight semester hours of geological sciences, chosen from courses that may be counted toward the requirements for a major in geological sciences.
19.
In fulfilling requirement 11 above, the student must complete the following courses. (For students in the marine and freshwater biology option, the marine science courses listed here may be counted toward requirement 11.)
a.
Biology 126L and 226R.
b.
Marine Science 320 and 120L.
c.
At least twenty-one hours of coursework chosen from the following: Biology 321, 327, 127L, 328, 128L, 354L, 361T, 370, 375, Geological Sciences 433K, Marine Science 440, 352C, 352D, 354C, 354D, 354Q, 354T, 170, 270, 370, 376K, Biology 364 or Marine Science 354E, Biology 448L or


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  Marine Science 354. Six hours of this coursework must be completed at the Marine Science Institute at Port Aransas.  

OPTION IV: MICROBIOLOGY

15.
Chemistry 610A, 610B, and 210C.
16.
Chemistry 339K or 369.
17.
In fulfilling requirement 11 above, the student must complete
a.
Biology 126L, 226R, 226S, 226T, 330, and 360K.
b.
Biology 329, 332, or 341; 333 or 366; and 339 or 364.
c.
Six hours chosen from the following: Biology 329, 332, 333, 335, 336, 339, 339M, 341, 361, 364, 366. A course counted toward requirement 17a or 17b may not also be counted toward this requirement.
18.
In place of requirement 12 above, the student must complete five hours of upper-division laboratory coursework, chosen from Biology 129L, 130L, 141L, 160L, 361L, and 368L.

OPTION V: CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

15.
Chemistry 610A, 610B, 210C, 339K, 353 or 353M, 370, and either Biology 339 or Chemistry 339L. (Biology 339 may not be counted both toward requirement 12 above and toward this requirement.)
16.
In fulfilling requirement 11 above, the student must complete
a.
Either Biology 320 and 344 or Biology 326D and 326E.
b.
Biology 126L, 226R, 331L or 368L, 349, and 370.
c.
Biology 366, 366R, 379G, or 379J.
d.
At least nine semester hours chosen from the following: Biology 323L, 325L, 226T, 329, 129L, 330, 130L, 332, 333, 335, 336, 337G, 339, 339M, 343M, 345, 347, 350M, 360, 160L, 366, 367.

OPTION VI: NEUROBIOLOGY

15.
Chemistry 610A, 610B, and 210C.
16.
In fulfilling requirement 12 above, the student must complete Biology 205L, 206L, 208L, or 309H.
17.
In fulfilling requirement 11 above, the student must complete
a.
Either Biology 320 and 344 or Biology 326D and 326E .
b.
Biology 349; 361T, 365R, or 371M; and 370.
c.
At least fifteen hours chosen from the following: Biology 318M, 437J, 359K, 365L, 465M or 371L, 365N, 365T, 365W; Chemistry 339K and 339L, or 369; Chemistry 353 or 353M, 354, 354L, 370.
18.
Nine additional semester hours chosen from the following: Biology 325L, 478L, Computer Sciences 303E, 313E, 323E, 324E, 326E, 327E, Psychology 308, 332, 353K. (Biology 325L may not be counted both toward requirement 11 above and toward this requirement.)

OPTION VII: PLANT BIOLOGY

15.
Chemistry 610A, 610B, and 210C.
16.
In fulfilling requirement 12 above, the student must complete Biology 205L, 206L, or 309H. Biology 277 or 377 may be counted only once toward the laboratory requirement.
17.
In fulfilling requirement 11 above, the student must complete at least twenty-four hours of coursework chosen from the following: Biology 320, 322, 122L, 323L, 324 and 124L, 327, 127L, 328, 128L, 331L, 343M, 350M, 351, 262, 262L, 363, 370, 472L, 373, 373L, 374 and 174L, 375.


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18.
Eleven additional semester hours of upper-division coursework in the College of Natural Sciences. A course may not be counted toward this requirement if it does not fulfill major requirements in the department that offers it.

OPTION VIII: TEACHING

This program is designed to fulfill the course requirements for certification as a secondary school teacher in Texas, but completion of the program does not guarantee the student’s certification. For information about additional certification requirements, consult the UTeach program coordinator.

15.
Chemistry 610A, 610B, and 210C.
16.
Six semester hours of geological sciences.
17.
In fulfilling requirement 12 above, the student must complete Biology 205L, 206L, 208L, or 309H.
18.
In fulfilling requirement 11 above, the student must complete
a.
Biology 320, 126L, 226R, 226S or 226T, 370, and either 324 and 124L or 322 and 122L.
b.
At least three hours chosen from the following courses in physiology, neurobiology, and behavior: Biology 322, 122L, 226S, 328, 128L, 329, 129L, 338L, 339, 341, 141L, 345, 359J, 359K, 359R, 360K, 160L, 361, 361L, 361T, 365J, 365K, 365L, 465M, 365N, 365R, 365S, 371L, 371M.
c.
One of the following courses with a substantial field component: Biology 321L, 340L, 342L, 353L, 455L, 456L, 373L, Marine Science 352D, 354, 354C.
19.
Biology 337 (Topic: Discovery Laboratory in Plant Biology) or an approved research methods course, and History 329U or Philosophy 329U.2
20.
Eighteen semester hours of professional development coursework: Chemistry 107 (Topic: Step I), Biology 101C (Topic: Step 2), Curriculum and Instruction 371 (Topic 20: Classroom Interactions), 371 (Topic 21: Knowing and Learning in Math and Science), 371 (Topic 22: Project-Based Instruction), Chemistry 107 (Topic: Special Topics Seminar), Curriculum and Instruction 667S.

ORDER AND CHOICE OF WORK

Students begin the Bachelor of Science in Biology degree program with eight hours of introductory biology for science majors (Biology 211 and 212, followed by 213 and 214), as well as Chemistry 301 and 302 and Mathematics 408C and 408D. The genetics course, Biology 325, is prerequisite to other upper-division biology courses. Students should consult with academic advisers about specific concentrations within biology, about appropriate courses in mathematics and physical sciences, and about course load and the balance between laboratory and nonlaboratory work. Most students select an option by the end of the second year and take at least twenty-one hours of upper-division coursework in the major in the third and fourth years.

The student must fulfill the University-wide graduation requirements given on pages 16-17 and the college requirements given on page 379. He or she must also make a grade of at least C in each biology course counted toward the degree, in each course used to fulfill requirement 11 of the prescribed work, and in each course used to meet the prescribed work requirements for his or her option.

To graduate, students who follow the teaching option must have a University grade point average of at least 2.50; to be recommended for certification, they must pass the final teaching portfolio review. For more information about the portfolio review and additional teacher certification requirements, consult the UTeach program coordinator.


2 Corrected 2/29/2000 and 3/20/2000, per email message received from Laura Kobler, Official Publications.


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Justification:
BS Biology - (modified from catalog, p. 387): The Bachelor of Science in Biology degree program offers eight areas of specialization, options in: ecology, evolution and behavior; human biology; marine and freshwater biology; microbiology; molecular biology; neurobiology; plant biology; and a teaching option. Many fields in the study of biological systems require broadly based training that transcends the classical boundaries of biology. A student interested in specializing in one of the BS options should take courses both in biology and in mathematics and physical sciences that complement biology. BS Biology: Option I: Ecology, Evolution and Behavior. This option is similar to the existing option in Ecology, Evolution, and Conservation Biology [about 200 declared majors, fall 1998]. Its curriculum requires field biology experience and also permits the greatest choice and depth of mathematics and physical sciences. Graduates may take positions with state agencies, enter consulting firms or continue with graduate studies

BS Biology: Option II: Human Biology. This new option provides an interdisciplinary education in contemporary biology. In addition to coursework in five core areas to ensure breadth in biology, the student takes 15 semester hours in one area of specialization within human biology. An honors thesis is optional within this major. Although this option was not designed for students in training for research or specific vocations, students in this option can select suitable areas of specialization to tailor their education to career goals in medicine, law or public affairs.

BS Biology: Option III: Marine and Freshwater Biology. This option requires a broad range of biology, geology and marine science courses and requires a summer of field study at the Marine Science Institute in Port Aransas. This major is similar to the former BS Option in Aquatic Biology and also resembles the course of study of some students in the current Option in Ecology, Evolution, and Conservation Biology.

BS Biology: Option IV: Microbiology. This option is very similar to the current BS Microbiology degree [418 BA & BS Micro majors, fall 1998], which is taken by students with a variety of goals, including those headed for medical school, those entering PhD programs, and those taking research laboratory positions after graduation.

BS Biology: Option V: Cell and Molecular Biology. This option differs little from the current BS Biology (Option I Molecular Biology) [about 300 declared majors, fall 1998]. A strong background in physical sciences and mathematics is recommended, and this degree option requires 28 semester hours of Chemistry, including a year of biochemistry and a year of physical chemistry.

BS Biology: Option VI: Neurobiology. This new option addresses the increasing student demand for more undergraduate courses in neurobiology and for more interdisciplinary preparation in neuroscience. We estimate that some 50-100 students will enroll in this Option.

BS Biology: Option VII: Plant Biology. This option was built from the current BS Botany degree [39 majors, fall 1998] but has greater flexibility. It is designed for students preparing for research and graduate study in any area of plant biology, from molecular biology to ecology and systematics.

BS Biology: Option VIII: Teaching. This option is similar to the current BS Biology Option III, Teaching [153 declared majors, fall 1998], and has been upgraded to incorporate the UTeach program requirements for secondary school certification in Biology.

Note: Students who would have majored in Zoology [258 BA and BS majors, fall 1998] are expected to select the BA Biology or the BS Options I, II or VI.


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On pages 392-393, in the section "DEGREES," make the following changes.

[BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BOTANY

Recent advances in the study of cellular and molecular botany have created a new frontier in the plant sciences. Cellular and molecular plant biology uses techniques such as plant tissue and organ culturing, protoplast isolation and fusion, and genetic manipulation of plant cells and genomes as well as newly developed biochemical and physiological procedures. The Bachelor of Science in Botany degree program (cellular and molecular botany) provides training in these techniques along with basic integrated training in the principles of botany, biology, and chemistry. It is expected that most students who complete this program will pursue graduate work in the physiology, biochemistry, cell biology, or molecular genetics of plants. Alternatively, students may prepare themselves for employment in an area of industrial plant science. This degree program permits a more intense concentration in basic and applied science at the cellular and molecular level than does the Bachelor of Arts with a major in botany.

PRESCRIBED WORK

1.
English 306 and 316K. In addition, in taking courses to fulfill other degree requirements, the student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component; one of these courses must be upper-division. If the writing requirement is not fulfilled by courses specified for the degree, the student must fulfill it either with electives or with coursework taken in addition to the number of hours required for the degree. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.
2.
French, German, or Russian 506 and 507 and a three-semester-hour course in the same language for which 507 is a prerequisite, or as much of this coursework as required by the student’s score on the appropriate language placement test; or the equivalent in another foreign language approved by the Department of Botany. For students who enter the University with fewer than two high school units in a single foreign language, the first two semesters in a language may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree.
3.
Six semester hours of American history.
4.
Six semester hours of American government, including Texas government.
5.
Three semester hours in anthropology, economics, geography, linguistics, psychology, or sociology.
6.
Mathematics 408C and 408D, or the equivalent. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 or 304E without degree credit to remove their deficiency.
7.
Three semester hours in architecture, art (including art history, design, studio art, visual art studies), classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts, music (including music, instruments, ensemble), philosophy (excluding courses in logic), or theatre and dance.
8.
Biology 302, 303, 304, and 205.
9.
Chemistry 302, 204, 610A, 610B, 210C, 339K, and 339L.
10.
Zoology 325.
11.
Microbiology 226, 227 or 228, and 129K.
12.
Twenty semester hours of botany, consisting of Botany 323K, 328, 128K, 331, 350M, 374, 174K, and one additional upper-division three-semester-hour botany course.
13.
Eight additional semester hours of science chosen from upper-division courses in botany, chemistry, microbiology, and zoology.
14.
Eight semester hours of physics, consisting of Physics 301, 101L, 316, and 116L; Physics 317K, 117M, 317L, and 117N; or Physics 303K, 103M, 303L, and 103N.
15.
At least forty-two semester hours of upper-division coursework.
16.
At least eighteen semester hours of upper-division coursework, including at least twelve hours in botany, must be completed in residence at the University.
17.
Enough additional coursework to make a total of at least 131 semester hours.


292


SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS

The student must fulfill the University-wide graduation requirements given on pages 16-17 and the college requirements given on page 379. He or she must also make a grade of at least C in each course used to fulfill requirements 8 through 13 of the prescribed work above.

ORDER AND CHOICE OF WORK

Students who plan to complete this program in four academic years will have very little flexibility in course selection unless they plan a schedule well in advance. Those with sufficient high school preparation may seek credit by examination for the first semester of chemistry, some foreign language courses, and other introductory courses. The writing requirement may be met simultaneously with other requirements when suitable courses are selected. These options will permit more flexibility, as electives may be used to complete the required total of 131 semester hours.

Students interested in graduate study in an area of subcellular biology are encouraged to take general physics and physical chemistry, and to take new courses in molecular biology as they appear in this rapidly changing area of biology. Students planning to seek employment in industrial laboratories should take courses in analytical chemistry, statistics, computer sciences, and other areas that provide skill in data collection and analysis techniques.

The Department of Botany assists the qualified student in arranging a summer traineeship with one of the department’s affiliated industrial laboratories or in a research laboratory within the department. The traineeship is normally undertaken between the third and fourth years.]

Justification:
Due to the reorganization of the School of Biological Sciences, departments have been merged into new academic groups. New degree plans and options have been designed to reflect these changes.


On pages 407-408, in the section "DEGREES," make the following changes.

[BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MICROBIOLOGY

The Bachelor of Science in Microbiology degree program is intended to prepare students for eventual professional careers as microbiologists, either upon graduation or after graduate study in the subdisciplines of microbiology or in related fields. In addition, it may serve as the basis for a career in many areas outside basic microbiology, such as pharmacology; medicine and health-related fields; agricultural, marine, and environmental science; and biotechnology.

The Bachelor of Science in Microbiology degree program requires the student to take more semester hours in science in a more intensive course of study than does the Bachelor of Arts degree program. The Bachelor of Science in Microbiology degree is intended primarily for students who have made a commitment to pursue a career in microbiology or a related area. The program is broad based, encompasses all the major specialties within microbiology, and emphasizes laboratory experience. Supporting work in biology, chemistry, physics, and zoology is an integral part of this program.

PRESCRIBED WORK

1.
English 306 and 316K. In addition, in taking courses to fulfill other degree requirements, the student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component; one of these courses must be upper-division. If the writing requirement is not fulfilled by courses specified for the degree, the student must fulfill it either with electives or with coursework taken in addition to the number of hours


293


  required for the degree. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.
2.
French, German, Spanish, or Russian 506 and 507 and a three-semester-hour course in the same language for which 507 is a prerequisite; or as much of this coursework as required by the student’s score on the appropriate language placement test. For students who enter the University with fewer than two high school units in a single foreign language, the first two courses may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree.
3.
Six semester hours of American history .
4.
Six semester hours of American government, including Texas government.
5.
Three semester hours in psychology, anthropology, economics, sociology, geography, or linguistics.

6.
Mathematics 408C and 408D. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 or 304E without degree credit to remove their deficiency.
7.
Three semester hours, preferably upper-division, in architecture, art (including art history, design, studio art, visual art studies), classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts, music (including music, instruments, ensemble), philosophy (excluding courses in logic), or theatre and dance.
8.
Chemistry 301; 302; 204; either 610A, 610B, and 210C, or 618A, 118K, 618B, and 118L; and 369. Physical chemistry (Chemistry 353 and 153K) is recommended for students interested in certain areas of specialization; departmental advisers should be consulted.
9.
Eight semester hours of physics in one of the following sequences: Physics 302K, 302L, 102M, 102N; 317K, 317L, 117M, 117N; or 301, 101L, 316, 116L. The last sequence is recommended for students interested in graduate study.
10.
Biology 302 and 303.
11.
Zoology 325.
12.
Microbiology 226, 227, 228, 129K, 330, and 360.
13.
At least one course chosen from each of the following groups:
a.
Microbiology 321, 322, and 332.
b.
Microbiology 331, 366, 368, and 369.
c.
Microbiology 335, 362, and 363.
14.
Eleven additional hours of upper-division coursework in microbiology, at least five of which must be in laboratory courses.
15.
At least forty-two of the 130 semester hours required for the degree must be in upper-division courses.
16.
At least eighteen semester hours of upper-division coursework, including at least twelve semester hours of microbiology, must be completed in residence at the University.
17.
Elective coursework to make a total of at least 130 semester hours. Departmental advisers will assist students in the choice of electives. In general, it is recommended that students take at least three semester hours of computer sciences (six hours are more desirable) and additional microbiology courses as part of these elective hours.

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS

The student must fulfill the University-wide graduation requirements given on pages 16-17 and the college requirements given on page 379. He or she must also make a grade of at least C in each course in a biological science taken at the University and used to fulfill requirements 10 through 14 of the prescribed work above.

ORDER AND CHOICE OF WORK

The student should consult the faculty adviser for the Bachelor of Science in Microbiology program each semester regarding course load and balance between laboratory and nonlaboratory work.]

Justification:
Due to the reorganization of the School of Biological Sciences, departments have been merged into new academic groups. New degree plans and options have been designed to reflect these changes.


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On pages 415-416, in the section "DEGREES," make the following changes.

[BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ZOOLOGY

The Department of Zoology has two undergraduate programs: a thirty-semester-hour major for the Bachelor of Arts degree and a Bachelor of Science in Zoology degree. These degree programs are intended to accommodate the diversity of student interests and needs in the biological sciences.

The Bachelor of Science in Zoology degree program is designed for highly qualified students who anticipate entering a graduate program.

PRESCRIBED WORK

1.
English 306 and 316K. In addition, in taking courses to fulfill other degree requirements, the student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component; one of these courses must be upper-division. If the writing requirement is not fulfilled by courses specified for the degree, the student must fulfill it either with electives or with coursework taken in addition to the number of hours required for the degree. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.
2.
Courses 506 and 507 (or the equivalent) in a single foreign language, and a three-semester-hour course in the same language for which 507 or the equivalent is a prerequisite; or as much of this coursework as required by the student’s score on the appropriate language placement test. For students who enter the University with fewer than two high school units in a single foreign language, the first two semesters in a language may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree.
3.
Six semester hours of American history.
4.
Six semester hours of American government, including Texas government.
5.
Mathematics 408C and 408D. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 or 304E without degree credit to remove their deficiency.
6.
Chemistry 301, 302, 204, and either 610A, 610B, and 210C, or 618A, 118K, 618B, and 118L; and eight semester hours of physics: either Physics 302K, 302L, 102M, and 102N or 317K, 317L, 117M, and 117N.
7.
Three semester hours in anthropology, economics, geography, linguistics, psychology, or sociology; and three semester hours in architecture, art (including art history, design, studio art, visual art studies), classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts, music (including music, instruments, ensemble), philosophy (excluding courses in logic), or theatre and dance.
8.
Thirty-six semester hours in the biological sciences, including Biology 302, 303, and 304 and at least twenty-four hours of upper-division coursework in zoology. The zoology courses must include at least one from each of the following areas:
a.
Cell biology: Zoology 320, or 326K and 326L.
b.
Developmental biology: Zoology 321.
c.
Genetics: Zoology 325 (taken alone or concurrently with Zoology 325L).
d.
Structure/function of whole organisms and phylogeny: Zoology 432, 333, 436, 442C, 346, or 453.
e.
Physiology: Zoology 351; 361K; or 365L and 365N, preferably with 265P; or 371L and 365N, preferably with 265P.
f.
Ecology: Zoology 440, 354, 357, 369, 370C (Topic: Behavioral Ecology), or 370K.
At least four courses in the Division of Biological Sciences must include laboratory work. Of these four laboratory courses, two must be in zoology and only one may be lower-division. The laboratory courses must be chosen from Biology 205, 206, 208, Botany 323L, 331, Microbiology 368, Zoology 325L, 432, 333, 436, 440, 442C, 346, 453, 265P, and 369.


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9.
Twelve additional semester hours of coursework in science, of which no more than three may be in the departments in the Division of Biological Sciences. Science courses outside the College of Natural Sciences may be counted with the approval of the undergraduate adviser. A course may not be used to fulfill this requirement if it cannot be counted toward major requirements in the department that offers it. A course in statistics is strongly recommended.
10.
At least thirty-six semester hours of upper-division coursework must be completed in residence at the University. Of these, at least eighteen semester hours must be in zoology, including one course in each of the six areas listed in requirement 8 above.
11.
Enough additional coursework to make a total of 128 semester hours.

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS

The student must fulfill the University-wide graduation requirements given on pages 16-17 and the college requirements given on page 379. He or she must also make a grade of at least C in each course in biological science used to fulfill requirement 8 of the prescribed work above.]

Justification:
Due to the reorganization of the School of Biological Sciences, departments have been merged into new academic groups. New degree plans and options have been designed to reflect these changes.


On pages 406-407, in the section "DEGREES," make the following changes.

[BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY]

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE

[This program is designed to enable the student preparing for a career in medical technology both to earn the bachelor's degree in four years and to complete the technical training required for certification by the Registry of Medical Technologists. The purpose of this degree program is to meet the increasing demands of the medical sciences for technologists with a higher level of science background and a greater degree of technical competence than can be attained by satisfying only the minimum registry requirements.]

The student preparing for a career in clinical laboratory science (medical technology) completes about one hundred hours of academic work at the University and then enters an accredited school of clinical laboratory science (or medical technology) for an additional twelve-month training program. Upon completion of the training program, the student is awarded the Bachelor of Science in Clinical Laboratory Science and is eligible for national certifying examinations administered by the National Certifying Agency (NCA) and the American Society of Clinical Pathologists (ASCP). Successful completion of these exams results in national certification as a clinical laboratory scientist or medical technologist.

The purpose of this degree program is to meet the increasing demand for laboratory professionals in hospital and clinic laboratories, research, industry, public health, education, and laboratory management. Clinical laboratory science is also an excellent foundation for graduate study in medicine, dentistry, management, education, and other disciplines.

PRESCRIBED WORK

1.
[English 306 and 316K.] Rhetoric and Composition 306 and English 316K. In addition, in taking courses to fulfill other degree requirements, the student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component; one of these courses must be upper-division. If the writing requirement is not fulfilled by courses specified for the degree, the student must fulfill it either with electives or with coursework taken in addition to the number of hours required for the degree. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.


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2.
Courses 506 and 507 (or the equivalent) in a single foreign language, or as much of this coursework as required by the student's score on the appropriate language placement test. For students who enter the University with fewer than two high school units in a single foreign language, the first two semesters ina language may not be counted toward the one hundred semester hours of academic work specified in requirement [13] 11 below.
3.
Six semester hours of American government, including Texas government.
4.
Six semester hours of American history.
5.
Three semester hours [chosen from the following: Psychology 301 (recommended), Anthropology 302, economics, or sociology] in anthropology, economics, geography, linguistics, psychology, or sociology.
6.
Mathematics 305G or 408C. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 [or 304E] without degree credit to remove their deficiency.
7.
Three semester hours in architecture, art (including art history, design, studio art, visual art studies), classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts, music (including music, instruments, ensemble), philosophy (excluding courses in logic), or theatre and dance.
8.
Biology [302 and 303, or the equivalent] 211, 212, 213, 214, 325, 226R, 226S, 226T, 126L, 329 or 330, 360K, 160L, 361, 361L, and three additional hours of biology.
9.
Chemistry 301; 302; 204; either 610A, 610B, and 210C, or 618A, 118K, 618B, and 118L; 455; and 369.
[10.
Microbiology 226, 227, 228, 129K, 360, 160K, 361K, and either 321, 322, or 330.]
[11.] 10.
Eight semester hours of physics in one of the following sequences: Physics 317K, 317L, 117M, and 117N; or 302K, 302L, 102M, and 102N; or 301, 101L, 316, and 116L; or 303K, 303L, 103M, and 103N.
[12.
Zoology 316K, 116L, 325, and three additional semester hours of upper-division biological science.]
[13.] 11.
Enough additional elective coursework if necessary to make a total of at least one hundred semester hours of academic work completed before the [fourth-year] twelve-month training program.
[14.
The completion of twelve months of training in a school of medical technology accredited by the Board of Schools of the American Medical Association and the American Society for Clinical Pathology. Upon completion of this work the student must submit a transcript showing grades in all courses in the school of medical technology to the Office of the Dean, College of Natural Sciences, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712-1199. To be counted toward the degree the coursework must be evaluated by the faculty adviser in the Department of Microbiology and approved by the dean. None of the work prescribed for the fourth year of this curriculum may be used to fulfill the residence requirement.]
12.
The completion of twelve months of training in a program of clinical laboratory science (or medical technology) accredited by the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Science (NAACLS). Upon completion of the program, the student must submit a transcript showing grades in all courses in the program to the Office of the Dean, College of Natural Sciences, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712-1199. To be counted toward the degree, the coursework must be approved by the faculty adviser in the School of Biological Sciences and the dean. None of the work in the training program may be used to fulfill residence requirements.

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS

The student must fulfill the University-wide graduation requirements given on pages 16-17 and the college requirements given on page 379. He or she must also make a grade of at least C in each course used to fulfill requirements [10 and 12] 8 and 12 of the prescribed work above.


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ORDER AND CHOICE OF WORK

The student should consult the faculty adviser each semester regarding order and choice of work and balancing the laboratory load. Students should complete the requirements both for general chemistry (Chemistry 301, 302, and 204) and for introductory biology (Biology [302, followed by 303] 211, 212, 213, and 214) during the first year, since these courses are prerequisites for [courses required in the second year] Biology 325 and

subsequent biology courses. Organic chemistry (Chemistry 610A, 610B, and 210C; or 618A, 118K, 618B, and 118L) should be completed as soon thereafter as possible since it is a prerequisite for [Chemistry 369.] biochemistry. To complete the program within four years, the student must take some courses during the summer.

Rationale and Justification for Program Name Change:
This name change, which has been approved by the faculty of the Section of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, has been proposed for several reasons. First, clinical laboratory science is a more accurate, less confusing name for the degree plan. Currently there is confusion about the name "Medical Technology" because students think it is a form of biomedical engineering (involving construction of prosthetics) or that it involves repairing medical equipment (such as X-ray machines). Changing the name of the degree to "Clinical Laboratory Science" makes it clear that this degree plan prepares students for a laboratory career.

Second, while the names "Medical Technology" and "Medical Technologist" are still in current use, the national trend has been to rename the profession "Clinical Laboratory Science." This national trend has also been seen in Texas. Six of the eight 12-month training programs that our students most often attend are now entitled "Program in Clinical Laboratory Science" rather than "Program in Medical Technology." In addition, two years ago, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio began offering a MS degree in Clinical Laboratory Science. Thus, changing the name of the degree plan aligns it with national and state educational trends.