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DOCUMENTS OF THE GENERAL FACULTY

PROPOSED CHANGES TO THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
CHAPTER OF THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 1998-2000


Robert G. May, Dean of the College of Business Administration and the Graduate School of Business, filed with the Secretary of the Faculty Council the proposal below for changes to the College of Business Administration Chapter of The University of Texas at Austin Undergraduate Catalog, 1998-2000. The proposal was approved by the faculty of the College of Business Administration and by the dean on April 9, 1999. The proposal was received from the College of Business Administration on April 23, 1999, and the edited proposal was received from the Office of Official Publications on August 6, 1999. The Secretary has classified this proposal as legislation of exclusive application and primary interest to a single college or school.

If no objection is filed with the Office of the General Faculty within five working days of the date of circularization, the legislation will be held to have been approved by the Faculty Council. If objection is filed within the prescribed period, the legislation will be presented to the Faculty Council at its next meeting. The objection, with reasons, must be signed by a member of the Faculty Council.

To be counted, a protest must be received in the Office of the General Faculty by September 30, 1999.


<signed>

John R. Durbin, Secretary
The Faculty Council



The legislation was posted on the Faculty Council web site (www.utexas.edu/faculty/council/) on September 23, 1999. Paper copies are available on request from the Office of the General Faculty, FAC 22, F9500.


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PROPOSED CHANGES TO THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
CHAPTER OF THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 1998-2000


1. On page 43 of the section Academic Policies and Procedures, under the heading The Minor, make the following changes to footnote # 1:

1. [Students who minor in management information systems may take Management Information Systems 304, 310, and six hours of upper-division coursework in management information systems or Management Information Systems 310 and nine hours of upper-division coursework in management information systems.] Students who minor in management information systems must take Management Information Systems 304, 310, 325, and a fourth course selected from a list approved by the department. [Management Information Systems 324 may not be counted toward the minor.]

RATIONALE: There is high student demand for broad IT skills and a high demand in all areas of industry for employees with such skills. The Management Information Systems faculty has redesigned their minor to meet the demands of students and industry.

2. On page 48-50 of the section Degrees, under the heading Engineering Route to the Bachelor of Business Administration, make the following changes:

The requirements of this program are

1b. To fulfill the requirement of six semester hours in natural science, students in this program must take [Chemistry 301 and 302] Physics 303K and 303L.

RATIONALE: The required physics courses have been moved to # 1.b. to fulfill the natural science requirement. Chemistry 302 is not a prerequisite for any course in the program outside of the Chemical Engineering Department, therefore it is unnecessary for most students. Additionally the ERB program at 132 hours has 12 more hours than the minimum 120 required for a Bachelor of Business Administration Degree. By dropping Chemistry 302, the program will be closer to the minimum requirement.

2. The following business courses: [Accounting 329 and] Management 367 and 374.

RATIONALE: Accounting 329 is no longer necessary for all Engineering Route to Business Students. It is being dropped as a required course and added to the Accounting/Finance Business block option. By dropping Accounting 329, the program will be closer to the minimum requirement of 120 hours for a Bachelor of Business Administration.

3. The following nonbusiness courses: Chemistry 301, Mechanical Engineering 210, and Physics [303K, 303L,] 103M, and 103N.

RATIONALE: Physics 303K and 303L have been moved to #1.b to fulfill the natural science requirement. Chemistry 302 has been dropped but 301 is retained and moved to #3 as a required non-business course.


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[4.] [Three semester hours in an engineering mechanics course chosen with the adviser's consent from Engineering Mechanics 311M and 314.]

RATIONALE: The Engineering Mechanics courses are not prerequisites for any course in the program outside of the Mechanical Engineering Department, therefore they are unnecessary for most students. By dropping Engineering Mechanics the program will be closer to the minimum requirement of 120 hours.

 
[5.]4. Mathematics 427K or Philosophy 313K.

RATIONALE: Philosophy 313K is a prerequisite course for some of the courses in the Computer Engineering block option while Mathematics 427K is the prerequisite for a number of courses in the other blocks. Allowing students to choose between these courses will facilitate their degree options.

[6.]5. Twelve semester hours of coursework, at least six of which must be upper-division, chosen from one of the engineering block options on page 49.

RATIONALE: A number of the block options have several lower-division courses as part of the options. This will guarantee that all students will have at least six hours of upper-division courses that will provide depth of knowledge in their chosen engineering field. This number of upper-division hours is consistent with the college policy of having six hours of upper-division non-business coursework.

  ENGINEERING BLOCK OPTIONS

Manufacturing Engineering

Mechanical Engineering 318, Engineering Computational Methods
Mechanical Engineering 326, Thermodynamics
Mechanical Engineering 334, Materials Engineering
Mechanical Engineering 352K, Engineering Computer Graphics
Mechanical Engineering 365L, Industrial Design for Production
Mechanical Engineering 366L, Operations Research Models
Mechanical Engineering 368J, Computer-Aided Design
Mechanical Engineering 373K, Basic Industrial Engineering

Mechanical Systems

Mechanical Engineering 318, Engineering Computational Methods
Mechanical Engineering 320, Applied Thermodynamics
Mechanical Engineering 326, Thermodynamics
Mechanical Engineering 324, Kinematics and Dynamics of Mechanical Systems
Mechanical Engineering 330, Fluid Mechanics
Mechanical Engineering 334, Materials Engineering
Mechanical Engineering 336, Materials Processing
Mechanical Engineering 338, Machine Elements
Mechanical Engineering 365L, Industrial Design for Production
Mechanical Engineering 368J, Computer-Aided Design


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  Computer Engineering

Computer Sciences 307, Foundations of Computer Science
Computer Sciences 310, Computer Organization and Programming
Computer Sciences 315, Computer Science II
Computer Sciences 328, Abstract Data Types
Electrical Engineering 312, Electrical Engineering Computation
Electrical Engineering 313, Linear Systems and Signals
Electrical Engineering 316, Digital Systems Engineering I
Electrical Engineering 319K, Microprocessor Programming
Electrical Engineering 331K, Electric Circuits and Electronics or
        Electrical Engineering 411, Circuit Theory—required
Electrical Engineering 335M, Electric Machinery and Magnetic Devices

Electrical Engineering

Electrical Engineering 312, Electrical Engineering Computation
Electrical Engineering 313, Linear Systems and Signals
Electrical Engineering 316, Digital Systems Engineering I
Electrical Engineering 331K, Electric Circuits and Electronics or
        Electrical Engineering 411, Circuit Theory—required
Electrical Engineering 335M, Electric Machinery and Magnetic Devices
Electrical Engineering 338, Electronic Circuits I
Electrical Engineering 368, Electrical Power Transmission and Distribution

[Project Engineering] Civil Engineering

Architectural Engineering 320K, Introduction to Design I
Architectural Engineering 320L, Introduction to Design II
Architectural Engineering 323K, Project Management and Economics—required
Architectural Engineering 335, Materials and Methods of Building Construction
Architectural Engineering 346N, Building Environmental Systems
Architectural Engineering 358, Construction Cost Estimating
Architectural Engineering 366, Contracts, Liability, and Ethics
Civil Engineering 311K, Introduction to Computer Methods
Civil Engineering 319F, Elementary Mechanics of Fluids
Mechanical Engineering 368J, Computer-Aided Design

RATIONALE: The courses added to the engineering blocks are courses for which individual exceptions are routinely granted. Adding the courses as choices in the blocks will facilitate the students' degree options and cut out an unnecessary process.

Changing the name of the Project Engineering block better communicates the nature of the curriculum studied.

  Chemical Engineering

Chemical Engineering 317, Introduction to Chemical Engineering Analysis
Chemical Engineering 322, Thermodynamics
Chemical Engineering 448, Computer Applications in Chemical Engineering
Chemical Engineering 350, Chemical Engineering Materials
Chemical Engineering 353, Transport Phenomena


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RATIONALE: Students often request exceptions to use Chemical Engineering courses as substitutes for courses in the other blocks and those exceptions are routinely granted. The addition of a Chemical Engineering block will facilitate the degree options of students with an interest in this field.

  BUSINESS BLOCK OPTIONS

Management Information Systems

Management Information Systems 304, Introduction to Business Programming
Management Information Systems 325, Introduction to Data Management
Management Information Systems 333, COBOL with Business Applications
Management Information Systems 333K, Computer System Utilization in Business
Management Information Systems 373, Topics in Management Information Systems
Management Information Systems 374, Business System Development

[Financial Management] Accounting/Finance

Accounting 326, Financial Accounting—Intermediate I
Accounting 327, [Financial Accounting—Intermediate II] Financial Statement Analysis
Accounting 329, Managerial Accounting and Control
Accounting 362, Auditing and Control
Accounting 364, Fundamentals of Taxation
Finance 367, Investment Management
Finance 370, Integrative Finance
Finance 371M, Money and Capital Markets
Finance 374C, Financial Planning and Policy for Large Corporations
Finance 374S, Financial Planning and Policy for Small and Medium-Sized Businesses
Finance 376, International Finance
Finance 377, Advanced Portfolio Management and Investment Analysis

[Sales Management] Marketing

International Business 350, International Trade
Marketing 338, Promotional Policies
Marketing 460, Information and Analysis
Marketing 363, Professional Selling and Sales Management
Marketing 370, Marketing Policies
Marketing 370K, Retail Merchandising
Marketing 372, Marketing Seminar

RATIONALE: The courses added to the business blocks are courses for which individual exceptions are routinely granted. Adding the courses as choices in the blocks will facilitate the students' degree options and cut out an unnecessary process.

Changing the names of the Financial and Sales Management blocks better reflects the nature of the curriculum studied.


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3. On page 52 of the section Degrees, under the heading Management Information Systems, make the following changes:

Add the following section:

ADMISSION

Students interested in pursuing the management information systems major must submit an application by June 1 to be considered for admission for the following fall semester or by December 1 to be considered for admission for the following spring semester. To be eligible for consideration, the student must have completed at least forty-five hours of college coursework, including Business Administration 101 and 102, Economics 304K and 304L, Mathematics 403K and 403L, Speech 305 or 319, and Management Information Systems 304, 310, 324, and 325. (Because business courses are restricted to business students, transfer students are usually enrolled in the College of Business Administration for one year to complete the required courses before being admitted to the management information systems major.) The student must also have completed the foreign language requirement for the BBA degree and must have removed any admission deficiencies. International students must have an acceptable TOEFL score. Admission to this major is competitive and is based on the applicantÍs University grade point average and on other relevant factors. Admission may be restricted by the availability of instructional resources.

RATIONALE: The Management Information Systems major increased in numbers steadily from fall 1990 with 138 majors to fall 1994 with 249 majors. In the last four years the number increased dramatically to 620 majors in fall 1998. All indications are that the interest in the major will continue and the number of majors will continue to increase.

The Management Sciences and Information Systems Department does not have the resources to provide a quality education for the high number of students who desire to pursue this major. The admission to major process is designed to screen for students who have the skills and abilities to be successful in the major and ultimately in the career fields associated with it. At the same time the process will allow the department to control the number of students admitted to the major so that the student body does not exceed the capabilities of the available resources.

4. On page 52 of the section Degrees, under the heading Marketing, make the following changes:

The requirements of this program are

3. Nine semester hours chosen from [the following courses:] Marketing 338, 363, 370K, and [the following topics of] Marketing 372 [: Topic 1: Market Area Decisions; Topic 2: Consumer Behavior; Topic 4: International Marketing; and Topic: Direct Marketing].

RATIONALE: Currently, individual exceptions are routinely granted to allow any topic of Marketing 372 to count as a Marketing elective. Dropping the specific topics from the catalog is consistent with current departmental policy and will facilitate the students' degree options.