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357a


DOCUMENTS OF THE GENERAL FACULTY

CHANGES FOR DEGREE REQUIREMENTS IN
THE DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN ECOLOGY
IN THE COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES CHAPTER OF
THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 1998-2000


 

Mary Ann Rankin, Dean of the College of Natural Sciences, filed with the Secretary of the Faculty Council the proposal below for changes in degree requirements in the Department of Human Ecology in the College of Natural Sciences chapter of The Undergraduate Catalog, 1998-2000. The changes have been endorsed by the dean and were approved by the faculty and the Natural Sciences Course and Curriculum Committee. The edited proposal was received from the Office of Official Publications on February 15, 2000. The secretary has classified this proposal as legislation of exclusive application and primary interest to a single college or school.

If no objection is filed with the Office of the General Faculty by the date specified below, the legislation will be held to have been approved by the Faculty Council. If objection is filed within the prescribed period, the legislation will be presented to the Faculty Council at its next meeting. The objection, with reasons, must be signed by a member of the Faculty Council.

To be counted, a protest must be received in the Office of the General Faculty by March 31, 2000.



<signed>

John R. Durbin, Secretary
The Faculty Council




This legislation was posted on the Faculty Council web site (http://www.utexas.edu/faculty/council/) on March 22, 2000. Paper copies are available on request from the Office of the General Faculty, FAC 22, F9500.


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CHANGES FOR DEGREE REQUIREMENTS IN
THE DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN ECOLOGY
IN THE COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES CHAPTER OF
THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 1998-2000


The changes set forth below are proposed for the College of Natural Sciences in The Undergraduate Catalog, 2000-2002, of The University of Texas at Austin.


On page 396, in the section "DEGREES," make the following changes.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN [CHILD] HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND FAMILY [RELATIONSHIPS] SCIENCES

This degree program is designed to provide both a knowledge base and practical experience in working with children and families in a variety of settings. The curriculum allows the student to gain knowledge of developmental theory and research and of strategies for designing programs for children and families.

Career opportunities are varied, depending on selection of electives and supplemental experiences, and include teaching in a private preschool program and positions in local, state, and federal agencies, demonstration programs concerned with children and families, and hospitals with a children’s unit. The curriculum also provides a foundation for graduate study in such fields as [child] human development, family studies, psychology, social work, sociology, special education, pediatrics, and early childhood education. Such advanced work offers preparation for college teaching, research, and work in public and private agencies serving children and families.

Students must choose either the human development or the family sciences option.

PRESCIRBED WORK COMMON TO BOTH OPTIONS

1.
[English] Rhetoric and Composition 306 and English 316K. In addition, in taking courses to fulfill other degree requirements, the student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component; one of these courses must be upper-division. If the writing requirement is not fulfilled by courses specified for the degree, the student must fulfill it either with electives or with coursework taken in addition to the number of hours required for the degree. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.
2.
Students who enter the University with fewer than two high school units in a single foreign language must take the first two semesters in a language without degree credit to remove their language deficiency.
3.
Six semester hours of American government, including Texas government; six semester hours of American history; [three semester hours of sociology or cultural anthropology;] and six semester hours, at least three of which must be upper-division, [of] chosen from courses in economics, social or cultural anthropology, and psychology [, at least three of which must be upper-division].
4.
Educational Psychology 371 and three semester hours of mathematics other than Mathematics 301, 302, 316K, and 316L. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 [or 304E] without degree credit to remove their deficiency.
5.
Six semester hours of coursework in [one of the following fields:] biology [, chemistry, microbiology, or zoology] or chemistry; and six additional hours chosen from the following fields: astronomy, biology, [botany,] chemistry, computer sciences, geological sciences, mathematics, [microbiology,] nutrition, and physics [, and zoology]. Courses designed for nonscience majors may not be counted

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  toward this requirement; students should consult the Department of Human Ecology for a complete list of these courses.
6.
Three semester hours in architecture, art (including art history, design, studio art, visual art studies), classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts, music (including music, instruments, ensemble), philosophy (excluding courses in logic), or theatre and dance.
7.
Students planning to work with infants and young children in a classroom-like setting must choose nine semester hours from courses in applied learning and development. Other students are expected to choose nine semester hours from an approved list of supporting courses available from the Department of Human Ecology. Students should confer with their advisers about courses appropriate to their career goals.
8.
No fewer than thirty-nine but no more than forty-eight semester hours in the Department of Human Ecology, including [Child Development] Human Development and Family Sciences 304, 312, 313, 113L, [316,] 322, 333L, 652F or two sections of 355, 260, [378L, Human Ecology 322,] and Nutrition 311. [Students who wish to concentrate in child development must also take Child Development 348 (Topic 1: Art and Science), 348 (Topic 2: Music and Literature), and three hours of 378K. Students who wish to concentrate in family relationships must also take Child Development 337, 372K, and either any topic of Child Development 378K or Human Ecology 347. Eighteen semester hours in the Department of Human Ecology must be completed in residence at the University.]
9.
At least thirty-six semester hours of upper-division coursework.
10.
Eighteen semester hours in the Department of Human Ecology must be completed in residence at the University.
[10.] 11.
Enough additional coursework to make a total of 126 semester hours.

   

ADDITIONAL PRESCRIBED WORK FOR EACH OPTION

OPTION I: HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

12.
Human Development and Family Sciences 316, 348 (Topic 1: Art and Science), 348 (Topic 2: Music and Literature), 378L, and either 347 or a topic of 378K.

OPTION II: FAMILY SCIENCES

12.
Two of the following courses: Human Development and Family Relationships 337, 347, 372K; and nine hours of coursework chosen from Human Development and Family Sciences 316, 322, 354, 378L, and topics of 378K.

Special Requirements

The student must fulfill the University-wide graduation requirements given on pages 16-17 and the college requirements given on page 379. He or she must also make a grade of at least C in each course used to fulfill [requirement 8] requirements 8 and 12 of the prescribed work above (with the exception of [Child Development] Human Development and Family Sciences 652F, which is offered only on the pass/fail basis).

Order and Choice of Work

The student should consult the faculty adviser each semester regarding order and choice of work.

Justification:

The primary reason for proposing these curriculum changes was to integrate the Family Economics program and courses into the CDFR curriculum. This will enrich the options in the Family Relationships track. This is why the division increased the general education options to include economics, added HE 312 as a


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requirement for students in the family track, and added Human Ecology 322, 347, and 354 to the list of courses from which students in the Family Track must choose. The second reason for the revisions was to give students in the Family Track more options since their required courses are sometimes offered only once every two years. This led to increasing numbers of students having their graduations delayed and having to petition for course substitutions. The increase in faculty in the family area has enabled us to offer a wider variety of family courses and will enable students to select courses that better meet their academic and professional goals.


On pages 408- 411, in section "Degrees," make the following changes.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NUTRITION

OPTION I: NUTRITION

SEQUENCE A

Prescribed Work

No changes to requirements 1 through 4.

[5.] 6.
Chemistry 301, 302, 204, 610A, and 369[, and a one-semester-hour organic chemistry laboratory]; Biology [302 and 303; and Zoology 316K] 211, 416K, and 416L.
[6.] 5.
Three semester hours in architecture, art (including art history, design, studio art, visual art studies), classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts, music (including music, instruments, ensemble), philosophy (excluding courses in logic), or theatre and dance.

No changes to requirements 7 through 11.

Justification: The one semester hour organic chemistry lab is no longer available. The two-hour lab has a CH 610A and B requirement. The current BIO 302 and 303 requirement has changed to the new numbers: BIO 211, 212, and 214. The physiology requirement, ZOO 316K, will be offered under a new biology number, BIO 416K, as a four-hour class. These changes delete one hour of chemistry and add one hour of biology.

Numbers 5 and 6 should be switched to be consistent with the other degrees offered.

SEQUENCE B

Prescribed Work

No changes to requirements 1 through 5.

6.
Chemistry 301, 302, 204, 610A, 610B, 210C, [369L,] 339K, and 339L; Biology [302 and 303; Zoology 316K] 211, 212, 214, 325, 365R, and 365S; and [three semester hours of upper-division coursework in physiology, genetics, immunology, or molecular biology] one of the following laboratory courses: Chemistry 369L, Biology 325L, Biology 331L.

No changes to requirements 7 through 9.

OPTION II: COORDINATED PROGRAM IN DIETETICS

PRESCRIBED WORK

No changes to requirements 1 through 5.


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6.
Chemistry 301, 302, 204, 610A, and 369[, and a one-semester-hour organic chemistry laboratory]; Biology [302 and 303; and Zoology 316K] 211, 416K, and 416L.

No changes to requirements 7 through 11.

Justification:

Requirement for CH 369L has been altered to be 3 hours of upper division laboratory from biochemistry, genetics, or molecular biology. As lab courses become available, they can be added to the audit list of permitted courses. This change is needed because students have difficulty getting into CH 369L. BIO 302 and 303 have been renumbered/structured to BIO 211, 212, and 214. Genetics, BIO 325, has been added as a requirement because it is a prerequisite for upper division physiology (365R and S).


On pages 413-414, in the section "DEGREES," make the following changes.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN TEXTILES AND APPAREL

OPTION I: APPAREL DESIGN AND CONSERVATION

No changes in option description.

PRESCRIBED WORK

No changes in requirements 1 through 8c.

d.
Six or seven semester hours chosen from Textiles and Apparel 212K, 212L, 316L, and 316Q. Students in the apparel design specialization must complete Textiles and Apparel 212K and 212L.
e.
Twelve semester hours chosen from Textiles and Apparel 315K, 126 and 226L, 355C, 355D, 164K (Topic 1: Flat Pattern) and 264L (Topic 1: Flat Pattern), 164K (Topic 2: Draping) and 264L (Topic 2: Draping), 164K (Topic 3: Advanced Apparel Design) and 264L (Topic 3: Advanced Apparel Design) [, and 355]. Students in the apparel design specialization must complete topics 1, 2, and 3 of Textiles and Apparel 164K and 264L. Students in the conservation specialization must complete Textiles and Apparel 355D.
f.
Six semester hours chosen from Textiles and Apparel 327, [355 (Topic: Computer-Aided Design),] 328, 355N, and 376.

No further changes in prescribed work; no changes in special requirements or order and choice of work.

Justification:

8.d. Textiles and Apparel 212K and 212L are prerequisites for required upper-division courses in the apparel design specification, including Textiles and Apparel 164K and 264L: Advances Problems in Clothing and Laboratory.

8.e. Requests have been submitted to establish the course numbers TXA 355C: Computer-Aided Design for Apparel and 355D Textile Artifact Management and Conservation. Both of these courses have been taught as topics of TXA 355: Problems Course but have grown into regularly scheduled courses. The changes here clarify these topics as choices in the requirement as opposed to the general TXA 355: Problems Course.

TXA 355D: Textile Artifact Management and Conservation is to be required for majors in the conservation sequence because the content of this course is directly relevant to the subject matter of the conservation sequence.

8.f. This course is listed among the choices in item 8e and is removed to avoid redundancy.


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OPTION II: RETAIL MERCHANDISING

No changes in option description.

PRESCRIBED WORK

No changes in requirements 1 through 8.

X.
No fewer than forty-six but no more than forty-eight semester hours in the Department of Human Ecology, including [Human Ecology] Human Development and Family Sciences 322 and 361; Textiles and Apparel 319; Textiles and Apparel 205, 105L, 212K, 212L, 315K, either 316L or 316Q, 352M, 355P, 260L, 260M, and 376; nine semester hours chosen from Textiles and Apparel 325L, 325M, 126 and 226L, 327, 328, 355D, 355K, 355N, and 164K and 264L; and three semester hours chosen from courses in [child development, family relationships,] food science, food systems management, human development and family sciences, or nutrition. Eighteen of these semester hours must be completed in residence at the University.

No changes in requirements 10 and 11, special requirements, or order and choice of work.


Justification
: TXA 355D is added as another option for this degree's requirement. This course was offered previously as TXA 355: Problems in Conservation.