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DOCUMENTS OF THE GENERAL FACULTY


CHANGES IN THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR OF JOURNALISM DEGREE IN THE COLLEGE OF COMMUNICATION CHAPTER OF THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 1998-2000

 

Ellen A. Wartella, Dean of the College of Communication, filed with the Secretary of the Faculty Council the proposal below to change the requirements for the bachelor of journalism degree in the College of Communication chapter of The Undergraduate Catalog, 1998-2000. The faculty and the dean of the College of Communication have approved the changes. The edited proposal was received from the Office of Official Publications on February 29, 2000. The secretary has classified this proposal as legislation of exclusive application and primary interest to a single college or school.

If no objection is filed with the Office of the General Faculty by the date specified below, the legislation will be held to have been approved by the Faculty Council. If objection is filed within the prescribed period, the legislation will be presented to the Faculty Council at its next meeting. The objection, with reasons, must be signed by a member of the Faculty Council.

To be counted, a protest must be received in the Office of the General Faculty by April 12, 2000.



<signed>

John R. Durbin, Secretary
The Faculty Council




This legislation was posted on the Faculty Council web site (http://www.utexas.edu/faculty/council/) on April 3, 2000. Paper copies are available on request from the Office of the General Faculty, FAC 22, F9500.


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CHANGES IN THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR OF JOURNALISM DEGREE IN THE COLLEGE OF COMMUNICATION CHAPTER OF THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 1998-2000

On pages 72 - 74, in the College of Communication chapter of The Undergraduate Catalog, 1998-2000, in the section "BACHELOR OF JOURNALISM," make the following changes:


BACHELOR OF JOURNALISM

To be awarded the degree of Bachelor of Journalism, the candidate must complete 120 semester hours of coursework and must fulfill the University-wide graduation requirements on pages 16-17, the college graduation requirements on page 66, and the special requirements, prescribed work, and major requirements below.

AREAS OF STUDY

Journalism courses are divided broadly into skills and studies courses and more narrowly within these two categories according to their level and probable writing content.

Studies courses (numbered 310—314 and 360—369): Journalism 310, 310K, 360, 361E, 362E, 363, 364E, 366E, 367E, 369

Studies courses that may contain a substantial writing component (numbered 340—349): Journalism 340C, 347S, 348S, 349T

Skills courses (numbered 315—319): Journalism 315, 316

Introductory skills courses (numbered 320—329): Journalism 320D, 322D, 325, 327
Open skills courses (numbered 330—339): Journalism 330, 331, 331K, 131P, 334, 335, 336, 338, 339D. In general, these courses are open to all students who have completed the skills core, Journalism 315 and 320D.
Intermediate skills courses (numbered 350—359): Journalism 353D, 355
Advanced skills courses (numbered 370—379): Journalism 370K, 371K, 372D, 373D, 374D, 375, 376D, 379

In addition, courses are divided into the department’s four areas of professional concentration:

Print journalism: Journalism 327, 335, 373D, 374D, 375, 376D
Broadcast journalism: Journalism 322D, 353D, 372D
Photojournalism: Journalism 316, 325, 336, 355, 370K, 371K
Multimedia journalism: Journalism 331, 334, 338

Courses in each area have prerequisites appropriate to their skill level; prerequisites may include testing, an interview, or other procedures in conjunction with the department application process. Information about these additional requirements is available from the departmental adviser.

Students are encouraged to take courses in at least two professional areas.

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS

To become a journalism major, a student must apply for admission and must indicate primary interest [to] in one of the [five] four areas of concentration within the department: [; these are the four professional skills sequences–news and public affairs, magazine journalism, photojournalism, and broadcast news–and media


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studies] print journalism, photojournalism, broadcast journalism, and multimedia journalism. The student should apply for admission [to a concentration] during enrollment in or upon completion of Journalism [312] 315. Admission decisions are made by the Journalism Undergraduate Selection Committee. [The student may not take the upper-division introductory courses(s) in a professional skills sequence unless he or she has been admitted to that sequence; these courses are Journalism 322 for the news and public affairs sequence, 327 for the magazine journalism sequence, 324K and 325 for the photojournalism sequence, and 320R for the broadcast news sequence.]

The student may not take any upper-division journalism course unless he or she has been admitted to [one of the five areas of concentration] the program. Students who register for upper-division journalism courses without having been admitted to [an area of concentration] the program will be dropped from those courses, normally before the twelfth class day.

Photojournalism students are encouraged to take a three-semester-hour survey or history course in the visual arts. Such a course may be a prerequisite to photojournalism courses.

No further changes to "Special Requirements."

PRESCRIBED WORK

1.
[English] Rhetoric and Composition 306, English 316K, and [a three-semester-hour course taught in the Department of English] an additional three-semester-hour course in either English or rhetoric and composition.

No changes to requirements 2 through 7.

8.
Nine semester hours of natural sciences, of which six hours (and no more than six) must be taken in one field of study. Courses must be chosen from the following fields: astronomy, biology, [botany,] chemistry, computer sciences, geological sciences, marine science, [microbiology,] physical science, and physics[, and zoology]. [Students may fulfill this requirement by completing nine hours of coursework in the fields that are part of the Division of Biological Sciences–biology, botany, microbiology, and zoology; no more than six hours may be in a single field.] For this requirement a student may take three hours of mathematics beyond those used to fulfill requirement 7.
[9.
For students in the photojournalism sequence, two or three semester hours of visual design or drawing and three semester hours in survey or history of the visual arts. These courses may not also be used to fulfill requirement 4 above.]
[10.] 9.
At least thirty-six semester hours of upper-division coursework.
[11.] 10.
No more than twelve semester hours of transfer credit in journalism may be counted toward the degree.
[12.] 11.
Enough additional coursework to make a total of 120 semester hours. No more than thirty-six semester hours in one subject may be counted toward the degree, except as indicated under "Major Requirements" below.

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

1.
[Thirty-three semester hours of journalism.] At least thirty-three but no more than thirty-six semester hours of journalism.
2.
[Journalism 310, 310K, 312, 360, and three additional hours of journalism. Journalism 310, 310K, and 312 are prerequisite to other skills courses.] The studies core, Journalism 310 and 360; and the skills core, Journalism 315 and 320D. Students must complete the skills core before taking open, intermediate, and advanced skills courses.


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3.
[One course in journalism perspectives chosen from the following: Journalism 323, 329K, 332, 352, 359, 363, 376, and 378.] Nine semester hours chosen from the following studies courses: Journalism 310K, 340C, 347S, 348S, 349T, 361E, 363, 364E, 366E, 367E, 369. At least three hours must be chosen from Journalism 340C, 347S, 348S, and 349T.
4.
[Fifteen semester hours in one of the following areas of concentration. Admission to some areas requires testing, an interview, or other procedures; information about these requirements is available from the departmental adviser.
a.
News and Public Affairs: Journalism 314, 322 (introductory course), 324, 336, and 361.
b.
Magazine Journalism: Journalism 314, 327 (introductory course), 336, 368, and 375.
c.
Photojournalism: Journalism 311K (introductory course), 324K, 325, 325K, and 370K or 371K.
d.
Broadcast News: Journalism 322 (introductory course), 320R (Topic 1: Specialized Reporting), 320R (Topic 3: Problems of Radio News Coverage), 321K, and 343R.
e.
Media Studies: Two courses chosen from the other areas of concentration, including at least one introductory course; and three courses in journalism perspectives in addition to the one used to fulfill requirement 3 above.]

Nine semester hours chosen from the following skills courses: Journalism 316, 322D, 325, 327, 330, 331, 331K, 131P, 334, 335, 336, 338, 339D, 353D, 355, 370K, 371K, 372D, 373D, 374D, 375, 376D.
5.
At least six semester hours of coursework must be taken in the College of Communication but outside the department. [Students concentrating in media studies must use Communication 360 to fulfill part of this requirement. A student may count up to] No more than forty-two hours (including transfer credit) in College of Communication coursework may be counted toward the degree. [, if these hours include at least one course in communication sciences and disorders or speech. Otherwise, no student may count toward the degree more than thirty-nine hours (including transfer credit) in College of Communication coursework.] Coursework in American Sign Language may not be used to fulfill any major requirement and is not included in the forty-two hours of coursework in the College of Communication that may be counted toward the degree.
6.
No College of Communication course to be counted toward the degree may be taken on the pass/fail basis, unless the course is offered only on that basis.

ORDER AND CHOICE OF WORK

FIRST YEAR

1.
The student must take three courses from the following group each semester:
a.
[English] Rhetoric and Composition 306.

No further changes to "First Year."

SECOND YEAR

1.
The student must take three courses from the following group each semester; four are recommended:
a.
English 316K and any three-semester-hour course [taught in the Department of English] in English or rhetoric and composition.
b.
Courses to be counted toward requirements 6, 7, and 8 of the prescribed work, including courses in American government or American history.
c.
Courses in the foreign language, unless the language requirement has been fulfilled.


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2.
Journalism 310[, 310K, and 312] and 315. [Students who plan to concentrate in news and public affairs or magazine journalism should take Journalism 314 as well.]
3.
Enough additional coursework, if needed, to raise the student’s course load to fifteen or sixteen hours each semester. Basic courses in accounting and computer sciences are especially recommended.

THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS

1.
Two courses certified as having a substantial writing component.
2.
Any outstanding requirements included in the prescribed work.
3.
[The remaining courses listed as major requirements for the student’s area of concentration.] Journalism 320D and 360 and additional coursework to fulfill the major requirements.
4.
Upper-division electives chosen to support the major. [Students in the concentration in news and public affairs, for example, normally emphasize government, history, English, sociology, or psychology. Students planning a specialty, however, should select courses to support that specialty: science courses, for example, would support a specialty in science news reporting; courses in fine arts would support a specialty in critical writing.] Students seeking teacher certification should consult the teacher certification officer, College of Education, for information about the courses required.


Rationale:
The faculty has approved changing the curriculum to meet department goals to balance studies with skills, give students strong grounding of core courses within a flexible program of study, encourage training across media and facilitate the productive combination of teaching and student efforts across courses.