View in portable document format.

215


DOCUMENTS OF THE GENERAL FACULTY

PROPOSED CHANGES FOR DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
IN THE DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS
IN THE COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES CHAPTER OF
THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 1998-2000



Mary Ann Rankin, Dean of the College of Natural Sciences, filed with the Secretary of the Faculty Council the proposal below for changes in degree requirements in the Department of Mathematics in the College of Natural Sciences chapter of The University of Texas at Austin Undergraduate Catalog, 1998-2000. The changes have been endorsed by the dean and were approved by the faculty and the Natural Sciences Course and Curriculum Committee. The edited proposal was received from the Office of Official Publications on January 27, 2000. The secretary has classified this proposal as legislation of exclusive application and primary interest to a single college or school.

If no objection is filed with the Office of the General Faculty by the date specified below, the legislation will be held to have been approved by the Faculty Council. If objection is filed within the prescribed period, the legislation will be presented to the Faculty Council at its next meeting. The objection, with reasons, must be signed by a member of the Faculty Council.

To be counted, a protest must be received in the Office of the General Faculty by March 24, 2000.


<signed>

John R. Durbin, Secretary
The Faculty Council



This legislation was posted on the Faculty Council web site (http://www.utexas.edu/faculty/council/) on February 18, 2000. Paper copies are available on request from the Office of the General Faculty, FAC 22, F9500. No-protest deadline has been extended from March 3, 2000 to March 24, 2000.

216


PROPOSED CHANGES FOR DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
IN THE DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS
IN THE COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES CHAPTER OF
THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 1998-2000



On page 385, in the section "BACHELOR OF ARTS, PLAN I," subsection "Majors and Minors," make the following changes.

Mathematics

[Major: At least thirty-two semester hours of mathematics, consisting of Mathematics 408C, 408D, 311, either 325K or 328K, either 343K or 373K, either 361K or 365C, and 362K, with a grade of at least C in each; and at least nine additional semester hours of upper-division mathematics. Mathematics 301, 304E, 305G, and equivalent courses may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Each student should consult the mathematics advisers for help in choosing courses consistent with his or her educational goals. Students considering graduate study in the mathematical sciences or seeking certification to teach secondary school mathematics should consult the mathematics advisers by their second year to learn which of the choices allowed above and which additional courses are consistent with their plans.]

Undergraduates seeking a Bachelor of Arts degree in mathematics must choose either the standard option or the mathematics for secondary teaching option.

Major, standard option: At least twenty-four semester hours of upper-division coursework in mathematics. Mathematics 301, 302, 303D, 305G, and equivalent courses may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. The student must earn a grade of at least C in Mathematics 408C and 408D and in each mathematics course used to fulfill the major requirement.

The student must complete the following coursework:

1.
Mathematics 408C and 408D.
2.
Mathematics 340L or 341.
3.
Mathematics 328K, 343K, or 373K.
4.
Mathematics 361K or 365C.
5.
Mathematics 362K.
6.
At least one course chosen from the following: Mathematics 333L, 439J, 339U, 343L, 344K, 348, 358K, 361, 367K, 368K, 372K, 474M, 376C, 378K. This requirement is intended to broaden the student's training.


Major, mathematics for secondary school teaching option: At least twenty-four semester hours of upper-division coursework in mathematics. Mathematics 301, 302, 303D, 305G, and equivalent courses may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. The student must earn a grade of at least C in Mathematics 408C and 408D and in each mathematics course used to fulfill the major requirement.

The secondary school teaching option is designed to give students the mathematical background appropriate for teaching secondary school mathematics, but students must meet additional requirements to obtain certification. Information about these requirements is available from the UTeach program. A list of the combined requirements of the UTeach secondary school certification program and the Bachelor of Arts degree is also available from the UTeach program and from advisers in the Department of Mathematics. The UTeach program is described on page 376.

217


The student must complete the following coursework:

1.
Mathematics 408C and 408D.
2.
Mathematics 340L or 341.
3.
Mathematics 315C, 325K, 333L, 358K, and 362K.
4.
Mathematics 326K or 360M.
5.
Mathematics 361K or 365C.
6.
Mathematics 328K, 343K, or 373K.


JUSTIFICATION FOR THESE CHANGES:


General Remarks

The proposed changes in the mathematics degrees are a result of departmental deliberations that began in 1996, and were accelerated by the 1996 visit of the External Review Committee. A set of five separate committees constructed the proposed plans; student response was solicited at two different meetings, and the plans were approved at a departmental meeting, and finally by the Undergraduate Studies Committee. The proposed plans are consistent with the recommendations of the Committee on the Undergraduate Program of the Mathematical Association of America. They are also of the same nature as contemporary degree plans in other leading institutions comparable to UT Austin. (Schools surveyed were UC Berkeley, Brown, Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Wisconsin at Madison, Maryland at College Park, Michigan, Ohio State at Columbus, Penn State, New York at Stony Brook, UC Los Angles and UC San Diego.)

The Existence of Two Degree Options

Although a mathematics degree is required for secondary certification at the University, there are substantial additional mathematics requirements. The existence of a second degree option allows these requirements to be made clear and explicit in the course catalog. In addition, the responsibility for certification in mathematics will belong to the college, and it again seems sensible to acknowledge this within the formal structure of the degree.

Expansion of Courses Which May Not Be Counted Towards the Degree

In addition to Mathematics 301 and 305G, courses 302 and 303D have been excluded. This acts to close a loophole; 302 and 303D were never meant to count toward a degree in mathematics.

Requirements for the Standard (non-teaching) Option

The total number of hours, and their apportionment between upper and lower division, remains unchanged(see point 5 below). There are five changes in the requirement:

1.
All mathematics courses must be passed with a grade of at least a C.
2.
Formerly, one of M325K or M328K was required; this has been eliminated.
3.
The requirement of M343K or M373K has been changed to at least one of Mathematics 328K, 343K, 373K.
4.
A breadth requirement has been added: at least one elective course must be chosen from a list of approved courses.
5.
The apportionment of upper/lower division hours required has been changed, to reflect the fact that M311 has been reassigned the number M341.


The first change closes a loophole allowing students to coast through elective courses; the electives are now a serious part of the degree.

Regarding the second change: The original requirement was intended to ensure that our majors had uniform basic skills. In the past decade, more and more students come to the degree with engineering or computer science background, and for those students the course requirement is unnecessary. The proposed plans eliminate these courses as a requirement; the department believes each individual's skills should be assessed through advising before a decision is made on the student's program. This would allow students to obtain a

218


richer education with the same number of degree hours. It also allows a better allocation of department resources.

The third change reflects a desire to redirect the B.A. degree to reflect a broader mathematical experience. The former courses covered algebraic structures, and it is believed that the concepts underlying these courses may be obtained equally well from a number theory course.

The fourth change, specifying a list from which at least one elective must be chosen, is intended to give a greater breadth to the degree. The courses listed cover a range of topics different from those in the other requirements.

The fifth change is due to a change in course numbering.

All these changes strengthen the degree as one giving the student a breadth of mathematical knowledge.

Requirements for the Mathematics for Secondary Teaching Option
The total number of hours, and their apportionment between upper and lower division, is the same as the standard degree, with two exceptions:

1.
M311 has been reassigned the number M341.
2.
M315 is now a required course

Elective courses have been replaced with requirements for specific courses, in accord with national standards for what secondary teachers should know. Specifically, the degree now requires:

a.
Mathematics 358K, an upper-division course in statistics. This is a reflection of the increasing importance of statistical methods of reasoning in our society, and requiring this course is in accord with the recent Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) standards.
b.
M333L, Modern Geometry, was formerly required for certification but not for the degree; this has now been made explicit.
c.
M315 and one of M326K or M360M are now required. These courses are ‘secondary mathematics from an advanced perspective’ and provide students a greater depth of understanding of the mathematical foundations of secondary mathematics. Such courses are recommended in the Professional Standards for Teacher Education of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics; the department feels they must be included in any serious teacher preparation program.




On page 405-406, in the section "DEGREES," make the following changes.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MATHEMATICS

As an alternative to the Bachelor of Arts degree, the Bachelor of Science in Mathematics is designed with a twofold purpose: to offer students a more extensive scientific program that may better prepare them for graduate study or employment, and to recognize students who choose to pursue a more demanding program. Students are given the opportunity to develop greater breadth and depth in their mathematical programs as well as to combine mathematics with a concentration in another scientific discipline.

To accomplish [this, both the minimum number of semester hours of mathematics required and the maximum allowed are increased by nine hours] these goals, the minimum number of semester hours is increased and the maximum limit is removed. Specialization in one additional scientific area is encouraged, and the foreign language requirement is shortened by one semester.

Students seeking the Bachelor of Science in Mathematics must select one of five options: actuarial science, applied mathematics, mathematical sciences, pure mathematics, and mathematics for secondary teaching. Students who choose the option in mathematical sciences must also select a specialization in either scientific computation or statistics, probability, and data analysis.

None of the following courses may be counted toward the degree: Mathematics 301, 302, 303D, 305G.


219


PRESCRIBED WORK COMMON TO ALL OPTIONS

1.
[English] Rhetoric and Composition 306 and English 316K. In addition, in taking courses to fulfill other degree requirements, the student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component; one of these courses must be upper-division. If the writing requirement is not fulfilled by courses specified for the degree, the student must fulfill it either with electives or with coursework taken in addition to the number of hours required for the degree. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.
2.
Courses 506 and 507 (or the equivalent) in a single foreign language, and a three-semester-hour course in the same language for which 507 is a prerequisite; or as much of this coursework as required by the student’s score on the appropriate language placement test. For students who enter the University with fewer than two high school units in a single foreign language, the first two semesters in a language may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree.
3.
Six semester hours of American history.
4.
Six semester hours of American government, including Texas government.
5.
Three semester hours in anthropology, economics, geography, linguistics, psychology, or sociology.
6.
Eight semester hours [chosen from] in one of the following areas: astronomy, [biological sciences,] biology, chemistry, geological sciences, and physics. [("Biological sciences" includes courses in biology, botany, microbiology, and zoology.)]
7.
Six semester hours in architecture, classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts (including art history, design, ensemble, fine arts, instruments, music, studio art, theatre and dance, visual art studies), philosophy, or programs of special concentration. For students in the teaching option, three of these hours must consist of History 329U or Philosophy 329U. For students in the other options, three of these [Three of these six semester] hours must be taken in architecture, classics, fine arts, or philosophy (excluding courses in logic).

[8.

No fewer than forty semester hours of mathematics, including Mathematics 408C and 408D, or the equivalent, 311, either 325K or 328K, 427K, 362K, 365C, either 365D or 373L or 378K, 373K, and at least six additional semester hours of upper-division coursework. Mathematics 343K and 361K may be counted toward requirement 8, but they may not be counted toward the requirement of six additional semester hours of upper-division coursework. A grade of at least C is required in all mathematics courses. Mathematics 301, 304E, 305G, and equivalent courses may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 or 304E without degree credit to remove their deficiency.]
8.
Mathematics 408C and 408D.
9.
Forty-two semester hours of upper-division coursework. At least six hours of upper-division coursework must be outside both mathematics and the subject areas listed in requirement 6. Philosophy courses in logic, computer sciences courses in discrete mathematics, and engineering courses may not be used to fulfill this requirement.
10.
Eighteen semester hours in mathematics must be completed in residence at the University.
11.
Enough additional coursework to make a total of 126 semester hours.

ADDITIONAL PRESCRIBED WORK FOR EACH OPTION

OPTION I: ACTUARIAL SCIENCE

12.
Actuarial Foundations 309.
13.
Economics 304K, 304L, and 420K.
14.
Accounting 310F or both 311 and 312.
15.
Finance 357.
16.
At least thirty-two semester hours of upper-division coursework in mathematics and supporting areas, consisting of


220


 
a.
One of the following courses: Mathematics 328K, 343K, 361, 361K, 365C, 367K, 373K.
b.
Mathematics 340L or 341.
c.
Mathematics 362K and either 358K or 378K.
d.
Three of the following courses: Mathematics 439J, 339U, 439V, 349P.
e.
Enough additional coursework to provide a total of at least thirty-two hours. In addition to upper-division mathematics courses, the following courses in supporting areas may be counted toward this requirement: Finance 354, 367, Legal Environment of Business 320F, 323, Management Information Systems 325, 333, Risk Management 357E, 369K, 377.


OPTION II: APPLIED MATHEMATICS

12.
Computer Sciences 303E or Mathematics 318M.1
13 Thirty-two semester hours of upper-division coursework in mathematics, consisting of the following courses. The student should consult the applied mathematics adviser for information on other courses that may be counted toward this requirement.
a.
Mathematics 340L or 341.
b.
Mathematics 427K, 348, 362K, and 474M.
c.
Mathematics 361 and 365C.
d.
Mathematics 343K or 373K.
e.
Enough of the following coursework to provide a total of at least thirty-two hours: Mathematics 346, 365D, 368K, 372, 376C.


OPTION III: MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES

Specialization in Statistics, Probability, and Data Analysis

12.
Mathematics 318M.
13.
At least thirty-two semester hours of upper-division coursework in mathematics and related areas, consisting of
a.
Mathematics 427K and 362K.
b.
Mathematics 340L or 341.
c.
Mathematics 361K or 365C.
d.
Mathematics 358K and 378K.
e.

Enough of the following coursework to provide a total of at least thirty-two hours: Civil Engineering 352, Computer Sciences 327E, Economics 341K, 350K (Topic 4: Advanced Econometrics), Electrical Engineering 366L, 379K (Topic 2: Quality and Reliability Engineering), 379K (Topic 15: Information Theory), Geography 360G, Management Information Systems 325, 373 (Topic 1: E-Business Application Development), Management Science 371 or 371H, Mathematics 325K, 439J, 339U, 439V, 346, 348, 349P, 362M, 365D, 368K, 474M, Mechanical Engineering 366L, 366M, 379M (Topic: Simulation Modeling), Psychology 325K, Risk Management 357E, Statistics 376.
        Courses should be chosen in consultation with the specialization adviser to form a coherent program consistent with the student’s background and goals. The student is responsible for meeting prerequisites and other requirements for enrollment in the courses he or she selects.


Specialization in Scientific Computation


1 Corrected 2/23/2000, per email messages received from Laura Kobler, Official Publications and Pat Bronstad, Office of the Dean, Natural Sciences.


221


Students who complete this specialization also fulfill the requirements of the Elements of Computing Program and may apply to the director of the program for a certificate of completion. The Elements of Computing Program is described on page 376.

12.
Computer Sciences 303E or Mathematics 318M, and Computer Sciences 313E.2
13.
At least thirty-two semester hours of upper-division coursework in mathematics and related areas, consisting of
a.
Mathematics 340L or 341.
b.
Mathematics 427K, 348, 362K, and 368K.
c.
Mathematics 361K or 365C.
d.
Enough of the following coursework to provide a total of at least thirty-two hours: Computer Sciences 323E, 326E, Mathematics 427L, 343K, 346, 361, 365D, 372K, 373K, 474M, 376C, Physics 329.

OPTION IV: PURE MATHEMATICS

12.
At least thirty-two semester hours of upper-division coursework in mathematics, consisting of
a.
Mathematics 340L or 341.
b.
Mathematics 427K, 361, 362K, 365C, and 373K.
c.
One of the following two-course sequences: Mathematics 427K and 372K, 358K and 378K, 362K and 339U, 362K and 439J, 348 and 368K, 365C and 365D, 367K and 367L, 373K and 373L.
d.
At least nine additional hours of upper-division coursework in mathematics, chosen with the approval of the mathematics adviser. Either Mathematics 343K or 361K may be counted toward this requirement, but not both.

OPTION V: TEACHING

This program is designed to fulfill the course requirements for certification as a secondary school teacher in Texas, but completion of the program does not guarantee the student’s certification. For information about additional certification requirements, consult the UTeach program coordinator.

Students pursuing this option are encouraged to become familiar with a variety of mathematical software relevant to secondary teaching, such as computer geometry systems, spreadsheets, and statistical software. Whenever possible, the student should take courses and sections of courses that use these types of software in place of those that do not.

12.
Mathematics 315C.
13.
Biology 370C (Topic: Research Methods), Chemistry 369K (Topic: Research Methods), or Physics 341 (Topic: Research Methods).
14.
At least thirty-two semester hours of upper-division coursework in mathematics, consisting of
a.
Mathematics 340L or 341.
b.
Mathematics 325K, 333L, 358K, and 362K.
c.
Mathematics 326K or 360M.
d.
Mathematics 361K or 365C.
e.
Mathematics 328K, 343K, or 373K.
f.
Mathematics 427K or 378K.
g.
Enough of the following coursework to provide a total of at least thirty-two hours: Mathematics


2 Corrected 2/23/2000, per email messages received from Laura Kobler, Official Publications and Pat Bronstad, Office of the Dean, Natural Sciences.


221


 
  326K, 427K, 328K, 439J, 339U, 343K, 343L, 348, 360M, 361, 362M, 365C, 365D, 368K, 373K, 373L, 175, 378K. A course used to fulfill requirements 14a through 14f may not also be counted toward requirement 14g.
15.
A three-hour supporting course that uses mathematics but is in a field other than mathematics. The following courses may be used to fulfill this requirement: Architectural Engineering 323K, Astronomy 307, 352K, 352L, 358, 367M, Chemistry 301, 303, Civil Engineering 321, 341, 352, Computer Science 307, Economics 320K, 341K, 354K, Electrical Engineering 302, 366, 366L, Engineering Mechanics 306S, 314, Geological Sciences 346C, 354, 476K, Geography 360L, Government 341M, Human Ecology 322, Mechanical Engineering 320, 326, 366L, 366M, Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 310, Physics 301, 303K, 303L, Psychology 325K, 332, 334C, 345, Sociology 369L, Statistics 376. The supporting course may not also be counted toward requirements 2 through 7 of the prescribed work.
16.
Eighteen semester hours of professional development coursework: Chemistry 107 (Topic: Step 1), Biology 101C (Topic: Step 2), Curriculum and Instruction 371 (Topic 21: Knowing and Learning in Math and Science), 371 (Topic 20: Classroom Interactions), 371 (Topic 22: Project-Based Instruction), Chemistry 107 (Topic: Special Topics Seminar), Curriculum and Instruction 667S.

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS

The student must fulfill the University-wide graduation requirements given on pages 16-17 and the college requirements given on page 379. He or she must also make a grade of at least C [in each semester of each course in mathematics taken at the University and used to fulfill requirement 8 of the prescribed work above.] in Mathematics 408C and 408D and in each course completed at the University and counted toward the prescribed work requirements for his or her option.

To graduate, students who follow the teaching option must have a University grade point average of at least 2.50; to be recommended for certification, they must pass the final teaching portfolio review. For information about the portfolio review and additional teacher certification requirements, consult the UTeach program coordinator.


[ORDER AND CHOICE OF WORK

The following is recommended as a typical program; it assumes that the student has the prerequisites for Mathematics 408C. Certain approved courses offered in the College of Business Administration may be substituted for economics. The science requirement may be fulfilled by approved courses in the College of Engineering. Additional courses that may be of interest to mathematics majors are offered by various departments in these colleges.

First year: Mathematics 408C and 408D; English 306; courses 506 and 507 (or the equivalent) in a single foreign language; three semester hours to fulfill requirement 5 of the prescribed work above; three semester hours to be counted toward requirement 7 of the prescribed work above; six semester hours of electives.

Second year: Mathematics 311, either 325K or 328K, and 427K; English 316K; three semester hours in a foreign language for which course 507 is prerequisite; six semester hours of American history; six semester hours of electives.

Third year: Mathematics 362K, 365C, and six additional semester hours of mathematics, including at least three hours of upper-division coursework; eight semester hours of science to fulfill requirement 6 of the prescribed work above; six semester hours of American government; a three-semester-hour elective to fulfill requirement 1 of the prescribed work above; three semester hours of upper-division electives.

Fourth year: Mathematics 373K and nine additional semester hours of mathematics, including at least six


223


hours of upper-division coursework; three semester hours to be counted toward requirement 7 of the prescribed work above; six semester hours of upper-division nonscience electives; six additional semester hours of upper-division electives ;five additional semester hours of electives.]


JUSTIFICATION FOR PROPOSED CHANGES

Removal of Maximum Limit on Hours Counted Towards the Degree
This change was made and approved several years ago, but did not appear properly stated in the current catalog.

General Remarks
The proposed changes in the mathematics degrees are a result of departmental deliberations that began in 1996, and were accelerated by the 1996 visit of the External Review Committee. A set of five separate committees constructed the proposed plans; student response was solicited at two different meetings, and the plans were approved at a departmental meeting, and finally by the Undergraduate Studies Committee. The proposed plans are consistent with the recommendations of the Committee on the Undergraduate Program of the Mathematical Association of America. They are also of the same nature as contemporary degree plans in other leading institutions comparable to UT Austin (Schools surveyed were: UC Berkeley, Brown, Illinois at Urbana -Champaign, Wisconsin at Madison, Maryland at College Park, Michigan, Ohio State at Columbus, Penn State, New York at Stony Brook, UC Los Angles and UC San Diego).

The Existence of Four Degree Options
The addition of options to the B.S. degree reflects the changing nature and uses of a mathematical education in the last twenty years. A degree which was originally constituted over twenty years ago to prepare students for graduate school in mathematics now serves the needs of those seeking a deeper knowledge of mathematics for technology, industry, or graduate study in computer sciences, applied mathematics, numerical analysis, statistics, as well as new and emerging fields of knowledge, such as mathematical biology. The mathematics department at The University of Texas at Austin has twice been named as the most improved department of the decade, achieving world-wide pre-eminence in mathematical physics, differential equations, algebra and applied mathematics. The proposed new degree options reflect the new stature of the department, and offer to our undergraduates the opportunity to pursue advanced training in new fields of knowledge.

Expansion of Courses Which May Not Be Counted Towards the Degree
Expansion of Courses Which May Not Be Counted Towards the Degree In addition to Mathematics 301 and 305G, courses 302 and 303D have been excluded. This acts to close a loophole; 302 and 303D were never meant to count toward a degree in mathematics.

Elimination of Requirement for Preparatory Courses
The original requirement was intended to ensure that our majors had uniform basic skills. In the past decade, more and more students come to the degree with engineering or computer science background, and for those students the course requirement is unnecessary. The proposed plans eliminate these courses as a requirement; the department believes each individual's skills should be assessed through advising before a decision is made on the student's program. This would allow students to obtain a richer education with the same number of degree hours. It also allows a better allocation of department resources.

Actuarial Science Option
The University currently supports an actuarial science program that has national stature. The program was singled out by the 1997 External Review Committee report as one for which "more industry-specific majors should be considered." That report particularly stressed that "coursework in other departments" should be required. The B.S. Degree, Actuarial Studies Option builds on the strength of the existing program, while implementing the recommendations of the External Review Committee. Students are required to obtain a strong basic training in traditional mathematics, as well as additional advanced mathematics training in upper-division courses that emphasize the use of probabilistic methods. Students are encouraged to obtain some of their upper-division hours by taking cognate courses in departments outside mathematics.


224


Applied Mathematics Option
This option recognizes the world-class stature of the department's applied mathematics faculty, and allows the student to benefit from the presence of those faculty. Students who obtain this degree will be qualified to enter any of the best applied mathematics graduate programs in the country. To this end, students are required to complete all the current requirements for a B.S. in mathematics, as well as to take advanced courses relevant to applied mathematics. The only exception is the algebra requirement; the requirement for Mathematics 373K has been changed. Students may now fulfill their algebra requirement either by taking a course specifically designed for the needs of applied mathematicians, or by taking two upper-division courses in algebra, M343K (Introduction to Algebraic Structures) and M346 (Applied Linear Algebra). The intent is a stronger training in the applications of algebraic structures.

Mathematical Sciences Option
This option recognizes the needs of students with applied or industrial mathematics interests, who will not necessarily go to graduate school in a traditional applied mathematics program. The degree is constituted by specializations, with each specialization having its own requirements and advisors. The specializations offer undergraduates the opportunity to benefit from the strengths of the University in numerical analysis (the program here is designed to mesh with the college's initiative in education for scientific computing) and statistics. Additional specializations in areas of departmental strength are being constructed; these will be in applied algebra and mathematical physics. The degree option has within it the flexibility to adapt to new fields as they develop, such as computational biology.

Pure Mathematics Option
This option is a strengthened version of the current B.S. degree in mathematics. With the flexibility afforded by the other B.S. degree options, this degree is now envisaged as meeting the needs of students who either intend to pursue graduate study in mathematics, or wish a deeper study of traditional mathematical topics. A course in complex variables has been added, as knowledge of complex variables is necessary in all graduate programs. In addition, students are required to take a two-semester sequence, in which they explore one area of mathematics in depth.

Teaching Option
This option provides an education for secondary teachers at a level of sophistication comparable to that of other B.S. mathematics degrees. Individuals seeking such a degree would include those who intend to teach advanced secondary mathematics, including advanced placement subjects. Teaching at this level requires more upper-division mathematics courses than can be counted under the B.A. degree. Consistent with other B.S. teaching options in the college, this option includes the teaching certification requirements for the UTeach secondary teacher certification program.