Click here to view document in portable document format (PDF)

462


DOCUMENTS OF THE GENERAL FACULTY


PROTEST TO PROPOSED CHANGES IN REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE WITH A MAJOR IN PSYCHOLOGY IN THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS (D 391-392)



Eric Opiela (student body vice president) has filed the protest set forth below pertaining to the proposed changes in requirements for the bachelor of arts degree with a major in psychology in the College of Liberal Arts (D 391-392).

Also see the related document D 464-466.

This protest will be considered at the Faculty Council meeting on April 17, 2000.



<signed>

John R. Durbin, Secretary
The Faculty Council




This legislation was posted on the Faculty Council web site (http://www.utexas.edu/faculty/council/) on April 11, 2000. Paper copies are available on request from the Office of the General Faculty, FAC 22, F9500.


463


PROTEST TO PROPOSED CHANGES IN REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE WITH A MAJOR IN PSYCHOLOGY IN THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS (D 391-392)



I wish to protest the "Changes in Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts Degree with a Major in Psychology in the College of Liberal Arts Chapter of The Undergraduate Catalog, 1998-2000, of the University of Texas at Austin," filed by Dean Richard W. Lariviere, of the College of Liberal Arts.

While recognizing that the crisis situation in the Department of Psychology is due to excessive enrollment, and that there is a need for some solution to ensure quality instruction, the Student Assembly is concerned about the ancillary impacts caused by this particular proposal to reduce course overcrowding.

First, we are concerned about the impact this proposal will have on the University's efforts to reduce overcrowding by encouraging students to carefully consider the courses in which they enroll and select a major early in their college career. If freshmen and transfer students are not allowed to declare their major as early as they currently do, they will not be able to avail themselves of departmental advising and will be slowed on their way to taking in-major courses, especially if they have accrued credit by examination or AP credit in core curriculum courses.

Second, and perhaps most importantly, we are concerned that changing the minimum GPA for remaining in the major without changing the minimum GPA for other departments in Liberal Arts will not totally solve psychology overcrowding, while shifting close to 800 students to other already overcrowded departments in Liberal Arts, such as economics, government, and sociology. With this proposal, instead of one severely overcrowded department we will potentially have three or four.

Finally, we are concerned about the additional bureaucracy and "orange tape" this proposal will add to the process, especially for upperclassmen having difficulty meeting the 3.0 GPA requirement to take in-major courses. These students will have to constantly check with their advisors to plan classes they can and cannot take contingent on their GPA at the end of each semester. As students advance along their degree plan, the number of non-major courses that can be taken for credit decreases. A system of waivers would have to be implemented for graduating seniors with just one or two courses left to complete, and who have GPAs between 2.5 and 3.0.

These are just some of the objections I have to this proposal, and it should be brought to discussion on the floor of Faculty Council. 

Eric Opiela (student member of the Faculty Council).