Index of Memorial Resolutions and Biographical Sketches

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IN MEMORIAM

WILLIAM G. HILL

Professor William G. Hill died on October 19, 1999. Born in Raleigh, North Carolina, on December 22, 1924, he received a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology and a Master of Social Work at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and a Doctor of Social Work at the University of Southern California. He served as a psychiatric social worker with the 3rd Armored Division in Germany from 1959-1962, as chief of Psychiatric Social Services at Letterman General Hospital in San Francisco from 1962-1966, and as social work consultant, Department of the Army, Washington, D.C., from 1966-1968. In 1968 Dr. Hill became director of the Office of Specialized Agency Services, Family Service Association of America. In 1971 he joined the faculty of the School of Social Work as professor and taught at the School of Social Work until 1982, when he was appointed professor emeritus.

Professor Hill provided leadership to the school's programs in the area of social group work practice and family therapy. He was well versed in a number of therapeutic approaches. Graduate students fondly remember evenings with Bill and his wife, Ruffin, in their Hill Country home, and long discussions about competing treatment modalities. He also emphasized the role of non-governmental agencies in social work practice.

Professor Hill served the Austin community and the State of Texas in many ways. His efforts included serving as chair of the board of the Austin—Travis County MH&MR Center, president of the State Association of Psychosocial Therapists, and chair of the Association's Licensure Development Committee.



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Larry R. Faulkner, President
The University of Texas at Austin



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John R. Durbin, Secretary
The General Faculty


This memorial resolution was prepared by a special committee consisting of Professors David M. Austin (chair), Michael L. Lauderdale, and Ronald C. Bounous.