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1999-2000 Faculty Welfare Committee Report

Appendix A

Summary of responses to questions addressed to Deans in Fall1999 regarding reported problems of adjunct/lecturer faculty.

The column numbers refer to the following concerns or questions posed in the survey of Deans:

1) "Too high a number of women in adjunct positions"

2) "Senior Lecturers have been raised to associate professorship"

3) "Many lecturers are paid less than half-time and lose out on benefits"

4) "Contracts come out late"

5) Comments regarding longer-term commitments for lecturers who have worked 6-7 continuous years at UT

6) Miscellaneous comments

7) Data from UT’s Office of Institutional Studies "Teaching Faculty by College, Rank, Ethnicity and Gender, Fall 1999"

a) number of nontenure-track women in Fall, 1999

b) number of nontenure-track men in Fall, 1999

College/School

1)

2)

3)

4)

5)

6)

7a)

7b)

Architecture Larry Speck

(via Swallow)

10 female &

9 male adjunct.

(higher % than among tenure-track faculty).

Yes. Heard of strong cases & believes they beat out others in a regular search. We have 1 possibility.

No. We do not do that.

All contracts come out at same time. Late contracts do result when faculty information is not complete.

Three-year contracts under discussion at Dean’s Council.

Also, possibility

to apply it to all lecturers; a "rolling" year-to-year renewal of that contract is another option.

a) Salaries equivalent to tenure-track.

b) Allow adjunct on budget council.

c) Allow use of "professor" without tenure.

d) Avoid adjunct "ghetto" stigma.

10

13

Business

Bob May

"well below 50%" (higher % than among tenure-track faculty).

Not a promotion but an application for a different position (requiring a search).

No. Not ethical & no incentive to do this since College does not pay the benefits on instructional appointments.

Yes, because of having to fill (last minute) gaps & to meet flexibility needs.

   

22

52

Communications

Ellen Wartella (via Janice Damon)

Not true for Communications.

Not without search during last three years.

Some depts. hire at less than 50% time, depending on their needs.

Even tenured faculty letters came out late in August last year.

 

Needs & funding not known early enough. Budget came in late May last year.

15

20

College/School

1)

2)

3)

4)

5)

6)

7a)

7b)

Engineering

Neal Armstrong

Only 4 females out of 48.

No--there has only been 1 exception in recent years.

No. Those <50% are working full-time outside w/ benefits.

Not a problem.

They should be informed of intent but actual appt. is based on budget approval by Administration.

 

4

46

Fine Arts Charlotte Canning & Adm. Council

          

Very few senior lecturers & lecturers w/ 6 or more years. How about multi-year contracts?

Lecturer position is positive opportunity for practicing artists to teach. They find it difficult to meet tenure demands in time allotted.

17

29

Law

Michael Sharlot

9 females &

23 males.

No.

Lecturers less than 50%:

6 females &

12 males.

Not true. Invitation letters sent out 4-5 months ahead.

We are engaged in trying to regularize employment of full-time lecturers who are clinicians. This will probably require changes in administrative rules at the university level.

 

28

43

Liberal Arts Richard Lariviere (via Elizabeth Richmond-Garza)

Women should

not be disproportionately represented in adjunct positions, & the matter will be addressed if an imbalance exists.

A few exceptions have occurred in past but now must have traditional searches to fill positions.

Issue emerged when a policy requiring teaching loads of 9 hours for full- & 4.5 hours for half-time was implemented for all faculty; unplanned enrollment shortfalls can be dealt with at Dean’s discretion.

Problems

w/ estimating no. of students enrolling in specific courses, e.g., Span. & Econ., from other schools can impact need for faculty positions.

Would generally support policy of notification for long-term lecturers by May 1 for fall semester & Oct. 1 for spring semester appointments if word "normally" added to policy statement. College has about 30 long-term lecturers.

a) Lecturers are hired as needed but not treated as 2nd class, esp. as regards their scholarship.

b) Many depts. hire grad. students before outsiders are hired.

65

47

College/School

1)

2)

3)

4)

5)

6)

7a)

7b)

Library Sciences

           

9

4

Natural Sciences

Mary Ann Rankin (via William Carlson, Assoc. Dean)

 

About 80 FTEs /yr. but headcount is higher.

Senior Lecturers:

13 females

(6.67 FTE) &

14 males

(3.75 FTE)

Lecturers:

84 females

(30.88 FTE) &

70 males

(25.12 FTE)

Adjunct:

8 females

(0.5 FTE) &

14 males

(3.75 FTE).

No. These are teaching-only positions; an appointment as an Associate Professor is offered to a person with a research record of high distinction. The two tracks are viewed as separate.

Note: most Adjuncts are

zero time.

Lecturers are paid according to their teaching loads.

Over-enrollment problems can cause late contracts. Development of a uniform college-wide policy to try to address this is underway.

College could easily support proposals to help long-term lecturers. Internal college policy is likely to develop in this direction. College has about 30-40 long-term lecturers.

 

69

63

Nursing

           

43

2

Pharmacy

                   

36

23

Public Affairs Leigh Boske, Assoc. Dean

Only 2 lecturers.

  

No part-time.

     

2

7

Social Work

           

25

6

Intercollegial Programs

           

3

1

Totals

            

398

386