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DOCUMENTS OF THE GENERAL FACULTY

PROPOSAL TO CREATE A BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN INTERDISCIPLINARY MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE, OPTION I: MIDDLE GRADES TEACHING IN THE COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES CHAPTER OF THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 2000-2002

Dean Mary Ann Rankin of the College of Natural Sciences filed with the secretary of the Faculty Council the proposal below to create a bachelor of science degree in interdisciplinary mathematics and science. The edited proposal was received from the Office of Official Publications on February 14, 2001. The secretary has classified this proposal as legislation of exclusive application and primary interest to a single college or school.

If no objection is filed with the Office of the General Faculty by the date specified below, the legislation will be held to have been approved by the Faculty Council. If objection is filed within the prescribed period, the legislation will be presented to the Faculty Council at its next meeting. The objection, with reasons, must be signed by a member of the Faculty Council.

To be counted, a protest must be received in the Office of the General Faculty by March 9, 2001.

<signed>

John R. Durbin, Secretary

The Faculty Council


This legislation was posted on the Faculty Council web site (http://www.utexas.edu/faculty/council/) on February 21, 2001. Paper copies are available on request from the Office of the General Faculty, FAC 22, F9500.


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PROPOSAL TO CREATE A BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN INTERDISCIPLINARY MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE, OPTION I: MIDDLE GRADES TEACHING IN THE COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES CHAPTER OF THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 2000-2002

The changes set forth below are proposed for the College of Natural Sciences in The Undergraduate Catalog, 2000-2002, of The University of Texas at Austin.

On page 424 in The Undergraduate Catalog, 2000-2002, before the section BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INTERIOR DESIGN, please insert the following:

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INTERDISCIPLINARY MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE

OPTION I: MIDDLE GRADES TEACHING

This program is designed to fulfill the course requirements for certification in Texas as a middle grades teacher in the composite teaching field of mathematics/science. However, completion of the program does not guarantee the student's certification. For information about additional certification requirements, consult the UTeach program coordinator.

Prescribed Work

1.
Rhetoric and Composition 306 and English 316K. In addition, in taking courses to fulfill other degree requirements, the student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component; one of these courses must be upper-division. If the writing requirement is not fulfilled by courses specified for the degree, the student must fulfill it either with electives or with coursework taken in addition to the number of hours required for the degree. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.

2.
Students who enter the University with fewer than two high school units in a single foreign language must take the first two semesters in a language without degree credit to remove their language deficiency.

3.
Curriculum and Instruction 371 (Topic 23: Reading, Writing, and Assessment across Disciplines).

4.
Six semester hours of American government, including Texas government.

5.
Six semester hours of American history.

6.
Educational Psychology 363M (Topic 3: Adolescent Development), or Psychology 301 and 304.

7.
History 329U or Philosophy 329U.

8.
The following foundation courses:

a.
Mathematics 408C, 408D, 315C, 316L or 362K, 326K, and 333L.

b.
Chemistry 301, 302, and 204.

c.
Physics 302K, 102M, 302L, and 102N, or an equivalent sequence. Students who choose the physics concentration must take Physics 301, 101L, 316, and 116L.

d.
Computer Sciences 303E or the equivalent.

e.
Biology 211, 212, 213, 214, and 205L, 206L, or 208L.

f.
Three semester hours of coursework in geological sciences.


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g.
Three semester hours of coursework in astronomy or marine science.

h.
Biology 370C (Topic: Research Methods), Chemistry 368 (Topic: Research Methods), or Physics 341 (Topic: Research Methods).

9.
One of the following concentrations:

a.
Twelve hours of approved coursework in mathematics, including Mathematics 358K. Mathematics 325K, 341 or 340L, and 360M are recommended.

b.
Twelve approved hours of coursework beyond the foundation courses listed above in any one of the following areas: chemistry, biology, physics, or geological sciences.

10.
Eighteen semester hours of professional development coursework: Chemistry 107 (Topic: Step 1), Biology 101C (Topic: Step 2), Curriculum and Instruction 371 (Topic 21: Knowing and Learning in Math and Science), 371 (Topic 20: Classroom Interactions), 371 (Topic 22: Project-Based Instruction), Chemistry 107 (Topic: Special Topics Seminar), Curriculum and Instruction 667S.

11.
Enough additional coursework to make a total of 126 semester hours.

Special Requirements

The student must fulfill the University-wide graduation requirements given on pages 17-18 and the college requirements given on page 401. He or she must also make a grade of at least C in all courses used to fulfill requirements 8 and 9 of the prescribed work above.

To graduate, students must have a University grade point average of at least 2.50; to be recommended for certification, they must pass the final teaching portfolio review. For information about the portfolio review and additional teacher certification requirements, consult the UTeach program coordinator.

 

Rationale:

The State Board for Educator Certification has created a new certification category: Middle Grades Teacher, entitled to teach grades four through eight. Every teacher preparation institution in the state of Texas is required to create new degree plans as a consequence. The proposed degree plan leads to dual certification in science and mathematics for the middle grades. Numerous studies have documented the lack of properly prepared mathematics and science teachers in the state of Texas. This proposal is the University's response.