Index of Memorial Resolutions and Biographical Sketches

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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

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IN MEMORIAM

ABRAHAM CHARNES

Abraham Charnes, professor emeritus of management science and information systems, died on December 19, 1992. He was 75.

Professor Charnes was born on September 4, 1917, in Hopewell, Virginia. He received bachelor's, master's, and PhD degrees from the University of Illinois in 1938, 1939, and 1947, respectively.

Dr. Charnes taught at the Carnegie Institute of Technology, and Purdue and Northwestern Universities. At Northwestern he was Walter P. Murphy Professor of Applied Mathematics. Professor Charnes joined The University of Texas at Austin in 1968. He held the Jesse H. Jones Professorship and was a University System Professor. He was later named John P. Harbin Professor in the College of Business Administration.

Professor Charnes was an internationally renowned authority in developing new and advanced mathematical methods used for management problem solving in government, industry, engineering, and medicine. Professor Charnes published more than 200 articles in professional journals and coauthored seven books. One of his best known works, An Introduction to Linear Programming, was translated into Chinese, Russian, and Japanese. Another publication, Management Models and Industrial Applications of Linear Programming, was translated into Czechoslovakian.

In 1975 Professor Charnes was a finalist for the Nobel Prize in economics. He was the recipient of other honors, including the John von Neumann Theory Prize of the Institute of Management Sciences and the Operations Research Society of America, and the Harold Lardner Memorial Award from the Canadian Operations Research Society. He also received the Distinguished Public Service medal from the U.S. Navy for his contributions as a research physicist and operations analyst during World War II.

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John R. Durbin, Secretary
The General Faculty


Biographical sketch prepared by Teresa Palomo Acosta and posted on the Faculty Council web site on February 6, 2001. Additional biographical sources can be found in the Barker Texas History Center and the UT Office of Public Affairs.