Index of Memorial Resolutions and Biographical Sketches

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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

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IN MEMORIAM

HUGO LEIPZIGER-PEARCE

Hugo Leipziger-Pearce, professor emeritus of architecture, died on July 13, 1998. He was 95.

Professor Leipziger-Pearce was born on December 8, 1902, in Breslau, Germany. He studied at Wilhelm University and the Art Academy in Breslau. Later he studied at the University of Hamburg. He was admitted to the German Institute of Architects in 1927.

Professor Leipziger-Pearce had a varied career prior to joining the faculty of The University of Texas at Austin. He was director and chief architect for the German government's community development program in Silesia from 1928 to 1933. For a brief time he practiced architecture in Paris, France. In 1934 he accepted a position with an architectural firm in Australia. His award-winning design for the firm's Women's Hospital in Melbourne brought him to New York to complete work on the Australian Pavilion at the 1939 World's Fair.

Also in 1939, UT Austin President Homer Rainey and San Antonio Mayor Maury Maverick Sr. matched Dr. Leipziger-Pearce's three-year Rockefeller grant and brought him to the University, where he taught until his retirement in 1974. During his long tenure at UT Austin, Professor Leipziger-Pearce initiated the Program in Community and Regional Planning and directed it for 19 years. He also worked with the Urban Planning Assistance Progam for Texas.

In 1950-51 he served as a postwar reconstruction consultant to the U.S. High Commissioner for Germany. In the mid-sixties he again served as consultant to the German government's urban and regional planning agencies.

Professor Leipziger-Pearce was an honorary member of the German Institute of Architects. His German work is housed at the Architecture Museum in Frankfurt as a example of early practictioners of the international style.

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John R. Durbin, Secretary
The General Faculty

Biographical sketch prepared by Teresa Palomo Acosta and posted on the Faculty Council web site on January 5, 2001. Additional biographical sources can be found in the Barker Texas History Center, the UT Office of Public Affairs, and in the Office of the General Faculty.