Index of Memorial Resolutions and Biographical Sketches

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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

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IN MEMORIAM

WILLIAM LLEWELLYN HOEY

 

William L. Hoey, associate professor of art, died on October 18, 1994. He was 64.

Professor Hoey was born on May 9, 1930, in Abilene, Texas. He received bachelor’s and master’s degrees in art from The University of Texas where he was a member of Phi Gamma Delta and Phi Kappa Phi.

Professor Hoey, considered a "magic realist" painter of the American Southwest, was well known for his work in still life and portraiture. He was a prolific artist exhibiting in a wide array of shows nationwide, including the Midwest Biennial of Omaha and the Crafts Biennial of New Mexico. Among his awards were purchase prizes at the Butler Institute of American Art, the Texas Watercolor Society, the National Exhibition of Small Paintings, and the Texas Fine Arts Association. Professor Hoey’s works are included in the permanent collections of the Mobile Art Center, the Roswell Art Museum, the Witte Museum, and the Butler Institute of American Art. Four works – "Waterfall," "Stream," "River Cliff," and "Wildflowers" – were included in The Texas Hill Country: Interpretations by Thirteen Artists (1981).

Hoey operated two galleries in Austin, the Carriage House Gallery and the SOHO Gallery. His last project was a straw bale house he designed and constructed in the Davis Mountains, from which he drew much of the inspiration for his paintings.

Perhaps of greater significance than Professor Hoey’s artistic endeavors was his devotion to and expertise in teaching. Beginning his teaching career at the Houston Museum of Fine Art’s Glassell School, he served as dean of the school from 1967 to 1970. He joined the faculty of the Department of Art and Art History at The University of Texas in 1978. Working primarily in the art education and visual art studies division, Professor Hoey established himself as a gifted teacher who, because of his experience as both practicing artist and gallery owner, could provide a unique perspective to his students. Students frequently remarked on Professor Hoey’s gentleness and warm guidance, as well as his great integrity as both an artist and a person. His colleagues remember and revere him as an accomplished artist who was also a gifted communicator, able to reach a wide range of students with humor and a personal modesty that served as a model for the prospective teachers he inspired.



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Larry R. Faulkner, President
The University of Texas at Austin

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John R. Durbin, Secretary
The General Faculty


This memorial resolution was prepared by a special committee consisting of Professors Rebecca Brooks (chair), Jarvis Ulbricht, and Susan Mayer, with the assistance of Teresa Palomo Acosta.