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1896


DOCUMENTS OF THE GENERAL FACULTY

CREATION OF A MAJOR IN URBAN STUDIES FOR THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE, PLAN I, IN THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS CHAPTER OF THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 2000-2002

Associate Dean Larry Carver, for Richard W. Lariviere, filed with the secretary of the Faculty Council the following proposal to create a major in urban studies for the Bachelor of Arts degree, Plan I, in the College of Liberal Arts chapter of The Undergraduate Catalog. The changes were approved by the dean and by the liberal arts faculty on a no-protest basis on November 14, 2001, and were submitted to the secretary on November 26, 2001. The secretary has classified the proposal as legislation of exclusive application and primary interest to a single college or school.

The edited proposal was received from the Office of Official Publications on February 11, 2002, and was sent to the Committee on Undergraduate Degree Program Review from the Office of the General Faculty on February 25, 2002. The committee forwarded the proposed changes to the Office of the General Faculty on March 19, 2002, recommending approval. The authority to grant final approval on behalf of the General Faculty resides with the Faculty Council.

If no objection is filed with the Office of the General Faculty by the date specified below, the legislation will be held to have been approved by the Faculty Council. If objection is filed within the prescribed period, the legislation will be presented to the Faculty Council at its next meeting. The objection, with reasons, must be signed by a member of the Faculty Council.

To be counted, a protest must be received in the Office of the General Faculty by March 29, 2002.


<signed>

John R. Durbin, Secretary
The Faculty Council



This legislation was posted on the Faculty Council web site on March 21, 2002. Paper copies are available on request from the Office of the General Faculty, FAC 22, F9500.


1897


CREATION OF A MAJOR IN URBAN STUDIES FOR THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE, PLAN I, IN THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS CHAPTER OF THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 2000-2002

On page 263, in the section DEGREES, add the following after the major in Turkish Language and Literature:

Urban Studies

Major:
Thirty-six semester hours of coursework, including at least eighteen hours of upper-division work, consisting of

1. Urban Studies 301, Introduction to Urban Studies; Urban Studies 315, Urban Research Methods; Urban Studies 360, Internship and Service Learning; and Urban Studies 370, Senior Project.
2. Twelve hours of upper-division coursework in urban studies, consisting of four of the following courses:
a. Urban Studies 350, Topics in Urban Politics and Governance
b. Urban Studies 351, Topics in Urban Economics
c. Urban Studies 352, Topics in Urban Design and Planning
d. Urban Studies 353, Topics in Urban History
e. Urban Studies 354, Topics in Urban Society and Culture
3. Twelve additional hours of thematically related coursework approved by the Urban Studies Faculty Advisory Committee. Students are encouraged to take these in one of the following disciplines: economic and workforce development, community development, urban governance and institutions, urban design/planning and ecology, and comparative urbanization. A list of approved courses is available in the urban studies advising office.

In addition, all urban studies majors must complete Mathematics 408C and 408D, or the equivalent, with a grade of at least C in each. Students must meet this requirement before they take Urban Studies 315, which is a prerequisite for most upper-division urban studies courses.

Rationale: The BA in Urban Studies will provide a program of interdisciplinary study for students interested in the multifaceted issues and intellectual frameworks employed to study cities. Serious issues confront cities in the US and abroad and a thorough examination of these issues in an academic setting require an interdisciplinary degree program. Over 83 percent of Texans live in metropolitan areas, slightly above the level for the country as a whole. Within a few decades, over 50 percent of the worldÐs population will live in cities. Urbanization and metropolitanization are bringing new and complex challenges to our society. These challenges include the enhancement of wealth generation and cultural creativity in our urban areas, the management of the environmental impacts of our infrastructure systems and building political and governance systems responsive to diverse populations. In addition, the ability to appreciate diverse societies in our ever-smaller world can be quite effectively developed through the study of cities in diverse historical and cultural contexts.

The challenges of urban society are generating a demand for individuals working in a variety of settings, including the private, public, and non-profit sectors, with a broad, interdisciplinary understanding of urban societies, their problems and potentials. At present no undergraduate degree program in urban studies exists in the state of Texas although many of our peer institutions in other parts of the country offer such degrees. We believe this degree program will prepare students for graduate study in such professional fields as urban planning, public policy, social work, and law as well as prepare students for entry level positions in the public and non-profit sectors.