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DOCUMENTS OF THE GENERAL FACULTY

CREATION OF A BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PSYCHOLOGY DEGREE IN THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS CHAPTER OF THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 2000-2002

Associate Dean Larry Carver, for Richard W. Lariviere, filed with the secretary of the Faculty Council the following proposal to create a Bachelor of Science in Psychology degree in the College of Liberal Arts chapter of The Undergraduate Catalog, 2000-2002. The changes were approved by the dean and by the liberal arts faculty on a no-protest basis on November 14, 2001, and were submitted to the secretary on November 26, 2001. The secretary has classified the proposal as legislation of exclusive application and primary interest to a single college or school.

The edited proposal was received from the Office of Official Publications on March 14, 2002, and was sent to the Committee on Undergraduate Degree Program Review from the Office of the General Faculty on March 20, 2002. The committee forwarded them to the Office of the General Faculty on March 25, 2002, recommending approval. The authority to grant final approval on behalf of the General Faculty resides with the Faculty Council.

If no objection is filed with the Office of the General Faculty by the date specified below, the legislation will be held to have been approved by the Faculty Council. If objection is filed within the prescribed period, the legislation will be presented to the Faculty Council at its next meeting. The objection, with reasons, must be signed by a member of the Faculty Council.

To be counted, a protest must be received in the Office of the General Faculty by April 5, 2002.


<signed>

John R. Durbin, Secretary
The Faculty Council



This legislation was posted on the Faculty Council web site on March 27, 2002. Paper copies are available on request from the Office of the General Faculty, FAC 22, F9500


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CREATION OF A BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PSYCHOLOGY DEGREE IN THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS CHAPTER OF THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 2000-2002

On page 265, in the section DEGREES, insert the following after the BACHELOR OF ARTS, PLAN II:

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PSYCHOLOGY

As an alternative to the Bachelor of Arts degree, the Bachelor of Science in Psychology is designed to offer students a more extensive scientific program that may better prepare them for graduate study or employment in research fields. Students interested in mathematics-based or physiology-based areas of psychology have the opportunity to develop more breadth and depth in the fields that complement their area of interest within psychology. To accomplish this goal, emphasis in the Bachelor of Science in Psychology degree is more on natural sciences and less on language arts.

In addition to the following requirements, students must meet the University requirements for graduation given in chapter 1 and the college requirements in the sections "Special Requirements of the College of Liberal Arts," page 249, and "Applicability of Certain Courses," pages 250-251.

A total of 120 semester hours is required for the degree. Of the 120 hours, thirty-six must be in upper-division courses. At least thirty hours, including eighteen hours of upper-division coursework, must be taken in residence at the University; at least twenty-four of the last thirty hours must be taken in residence at the University. Provided residence rules are met, credit may be earned by examination, by extension, by correspondence (up to 30 percent of the hours required for the degree), or, with the approval of the dean, by work transferred from another institution. No courses used to fulfill area, major, or minor requirements may be taken on the pass/fail basis. No more than thirty-six hours may be counted in any one subject (including psychology) or in courses offered in any one college or school other than the College of Liberal Arts or the College of Natural Sciences.

Four categories of work must be completed: prescribed work, the major, the minor, and electives. Only in the following cases may a single course be counted toward more than one requirement:

1. Courses counted toward the prescribed work may also be counted toward the major.
2. Up to three hours of coursework counted toward the prescribed work may also be counted toward the minor.
3. Courses counted toward the substantial writing component requirement may also be counted toward other requirements.

PRESCRIBED WORK

AREA A, LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

1. English composition and literature: Rhetoric and Composition 306 and English 316K.
2. Writing: In addition to Rhetoric and Composition 306 and English 316K, each student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component. One of these courses must be upper-division; both must be taken for a letter grade. Courses used to fulfill the writing requirement may be used simultaneously to fulfill other area requirements or major requirements, unless otherwise specified. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.
3. Foreign language/culture: Students must complete one of the following options:
a. Second-semester-level proficiency in a foreign language.
b. First-semester-level proficiency in a foreign language and a three-semester-hour course in the culture of the same language area.
c. Two three-hour foreign culture courses chosen from a list available in the Student Division and the Department of Psychology.


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AREA B, SOCIAL SCIENCES

Eighteen semester hours, distributed among at least four of the following fields of study.

1. Six hours in each of the following fields of study:
a. American government, including Texas government
b. American history
2. Three hours each from any two of the following fields of study:
a. Anthropology
b. Economics
c. Geography
d. Linguistics
e. Psychology
f. Sociology
  With the approval of the dean, courses in other social sciences may be counted toward this requirement.

AREA C, NATURAL SCIENCES

At least of twenty-five semester hours in natural sciences, consisting of

1. At least nine semester hours of mathematics: Mathematics 305G, 408C, and 316 or a higher-level math course in probability.
2. Sixteen to eighteen semester hours, consisting of the following sequences:
a. Biology 211, 212, 214, and 325
b. Chemistry 301, 302, and 204
c. Computer Sciences 303E, 313E, and one of the following: Computer Sciences 323E, 324E, 326E, 327E
d. Physics 317K, 117M, 317L, and 117N; or 301, 101L, 316, and 116L; or 303K, 103M, 303L, and 103N

AREA D, GENERAL CULTURE

Six semester hours from the fields of study listed below. Three of these six hours must be chosen from subarea 1, 2, 3, or 4 (excluding courses in logic).

A student who uses Greek or Latin to meet the foreign language requirement may use additional coursework in the same language to meet the Area D requirement, but only courses beyond the second-semester proficiency level may be used.

1. Architecture
2. Classics, including classical civilization, Greek, Latin
3. Fine arts, including art history, design, ensemble, fine arts, instruments, music, studio art, theatre and dance, visual art studies
4. Philosophy
5. Other courses that emphasize the topics listed above, if approved by the Office of the Dean. A list of approved alternatives is available each semester in the Student Division and on the college Web site.

THE MAJOR

Twenty-eight semester hours of psychology, including Psychology 301 and 418, each with a grade of at least C, and at least eighteen semester hours of upper-division coursework. Of these twenty-eight hours, eighteen hours, including Psychology 418 and at least six hours of upper-division coursework, must be completed in residence at the University. Also included in these twenty-eight hours must be at least one three-semester-hour course in each of four areas:

I.
Clinical/social psychology
II.
Cognition/language
III.
Developmental/evolutionary psychology


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IV.
Neuroscience/perception

A list of the courses in each area is available in the Department of Psychology Undergraduate Office and on the department Web site at http://www.psy.utexas.edu.

Psychology majors must earn a grade of at least C in Psychology 418 to register for upper-division psychology courses. Students may not enroll in Psychology 418 more than twice.

Psychology 357 and 359 may not be counted toward the twenty-eight hours in psychology required for the major.

THE MINOR

Twelve semester hours, including at least nine hours of upper-division coursework, in any one other field of study in the University. Six of the twelve hours must be taken in residence. No more than three of the twelve hours may also be counted toward any area requirement for the degree.

Additional restrictions may be imposed by the academic department(s) in which the student completes the minor; before planning to use a course to fulfill the minor requirement, the student should also consult the department or program that offers the course.

ELECTIVES

The remaining coursework needed for the required total of 120 semester hours consists of electives. A maximum of sixteen hours of elective coursework may be taken on a pass/fail basis.

MINIMUM SCHOLASTIC REQUIREMENTS

The student must earn a grade point average of at least 2.00 in courses taken at the University (including credit by examination, correspondence, and extension) for which a grade or symbol other than Q, W, X, or CR is recorded. In addition, the student must earn a grade point average of at least 2.00 in courses taken at the University and counted toward the major requirement.

For more information about grades and the grade point average, see General Information.

HONORS

Students in this degree program may pursue any of the honors programs available to Bachelor of Arts, Plan I students. These programs are described in the section "Liberal Arts Honors Programs, Plan I," page 242.

On page 249, in the section GRADUATION, make the following change:

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS OF THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS

All students must fulfill the general requirements for graduation given in chapter 1. Students in the College of Liberal Arts must also fulfill the following requirements.

1. The University requires that the student complete in residence at least thirty semester hours of the coursework counted toward the degree. For the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I, and the Bachelor of Science in Psychology, these thirty hours must include at least eighteen hours in the major. For the Bachelor of Arts, Plan II, these thirty hours must be taken in the College of Liberal Arts or the College of Natural Sciences.
2. The University requires that at least six semester hours of advanced coursework in the major be completed in residence. For additional requirements of [majors in] the College of Liberal Arts, see the major


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  requirements [that begin on page 255] of the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I, pages 255-263, and the requirements of the Bachelor of Science in Psychology, page 365.

 
On page 251, in the section DEGREES, under the heading APPLICABILITY OF CERTAIN COURSES, make the following changes:

COURSES TAKEN ON THE PASS/FAIL BASIS

No more than sixteen semester hours taken on the pass/fail basis may be counted toward the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I, or the Bachelor of Science in Psychology; no more than nineteen semester hours taken on the pass/fail basis may be counted toward the Bachelor of Arts, Plan II. In general, only electives may be taken on the pass/fail basis. Complete rules on registration on the pass/fail basis are given in General Information.

COURSES IN A SINGLE FIELD

No more than thirty-six hours may be counted in any one subject (including the major, unless major requirements state otherwise) or in courses offered in any one college or school other than the College of Liberal Arts or the College of Natural Sciences.

Rationale: The Bachelor of Science degree plan will require students to become better educated in the biological and quantitative aspects of Psychology. Psychology departments at other comparable institutions offer both a BA and a BS degree. The general requirements have been restructured similarly to Bachelor of Science degrees in the College of Natural Sciences, with less emphasis on foreign languages and more emphasis on mathematics and sciences. A Non-substantive Change Request has been submitted to the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.