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DOCUMENTS OF THE GENERAL FACULTY

PROPOSED CHANGES TO THE HUMAN ECOLOGY SECTION OF THE COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES CHAPTER OF THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 2000-2002

 

Dean Mary Ann Rankin filed with the secretary of the Faculty Council the following proposed changes to the human ecology section in the College of Natural Sciences chapter of The Undergraduate Catalog. The dean submitted the proposed changes to the secretary on November 27, 2001, indicating that the departments in the College of Natural Sciences, as well as the College of Natural Sciences Course and Curriculum Committee approved them. The secretary has classified this proposal as legislation of exclusive application and primary interest to a single college or school.

The edited proposal was received from the Office of Official Publications on February 7, 2002, and was sent to the Committee on Undergraduate Degree Program Review from the Office of the General Faculty on February 18, 2002. The committee forwarded the proposed changes to the Office of the General Faculty on March 1, 2002, recommending approval. However, the committee also recommends that as soon as practicable, the colleges consider the option of replacing each requirement of M 408C or M 408D by an equivalent of one or more of the new courses M 408K, M 408L, and M 408M. The authority to grant final approval on behalf of the General Faculty resides with the Faculty Council.

If no objection is filed with the Office of the General Faculty by the date specified below, the legislation will be held to have been approved by the Faculty Council. If objection is filed within the prescribed period, the legislation will be presented to the Faculty Council at its next meeting. The objection, with reasons, must be signed by a member of the Faculty Council.

To be counted, a protest must be received in the Office of the General Faculty by March 13, 2002.


<signed>

John R. Durbin, Secretary
The Faculty Council


This legislation was posted on the Faculty Council web site on March 5, 2002. Paper copies are available on request from the Office of the General Faculty, FAC 22, F9500.


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PROPOSED CHANGES TO THE HUMAN ECOLOGY SECTION OF THE COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES CHAPTER OF THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 2000-2002

 

In Chapter 9 of The Undergraduate Catalog, 2000-2002, on page 400, in the section ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES, under the heading HONORS, make the following changes:

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND FAMILY SCIENCES HONORS PROGRAM

Majors who plan to seek special honors in human development and family sciences should apply to the Departmental Honors Committee for admission to the honors program no later than the beginning of the senior year. The requirements for admission are a University grade point average of at least 3.00 and a grade point average of at least 3.50 in coursework in the Department of Human Ecology that is required for the degree. The requirements for graduation with special honors are (1) all requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Human Development and Family Sciences; (2) Human Development and Family Sciences 379H, Honors Tutorial Course; this course may be repeated once for credit; (3) completion of an honors thesis and an accompanying presentation, both of which must be approved by a committee consisting of the research supervisor and another faculty member; (4) a University grade point average of at least 3.00, a grade point average in Human Development and Family Sciences 379H of at least 3.00, and a grade point average of at least 3.50 in coursework in the Department of Human Ecology that is required for the degree and for honors; and (5) completion at the University of at least sixty semester hours of coursework counted toward the degree.

HUMAN ECOLOGY HONORS PROGRAM[S]

[Majors who plan to seek special honors in human development and family sciences, human ecology, nutrition, or textiles and apparel should apply to the honors adviser for admission to the honors program no later than the beginning of the senior year. A University grade point average of at least 3.00 is required for admission. The requirements for graduation with special honors are (1) a grade of at least B in the honors reading course in the student's field of study; these courses are Human Development and Family Sciences 359H, Nutrition 359H, and Textiles and Apparel 359H; (2) a grade of at least B in the honors tutorial course in the student's field of study; these courses are Human Development and Family Sciences 379H, Nutrition 379H, and Textiles and Apparel 379H; (3) satisfactory performance on a comprehensive honors examination; (4) a grade point average of at least 3.50 in the honors reading course and the honors tutorial course and commensurate performance on the honors examination; (5) a University grade point average of at least 3.00 and a grade point average in the Department of Human Ecology of at least 3.50; and (6) completion of the University of at least sixty semester hours of coursework counted toward the degree.]

Majors who plan to seek special honors in human ecology must follow the requirements of the Honors Program in Human Development and Family Sciences, Nutrition, or Textiles and Apparel.

Rationale: To provide a more rigorous honors program.


In Chapter 9 of The Undergraduate Catalog, 2000-2002, on page 401, in the section ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES, under the heading HONORS, insert the following after the section MATHEMATICS HONORS PROGRAM:

NUTRITION HONORS PROGRAM


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Majors who plan to seek special honors in nutrition should apply to the Departmental Honors Committee for admission to the honors program no later than the beginning of the senior year. The requirements for admission are a University grade point average of at least 3.00 and a grade point average of at least 3.50 in coursework in the Department of Human Ecology that is required for the degree. The requirements for graduation with special honors are (1) all requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Nutrition; (2) Nutrition 379H, Honors Tutorial Course; this course may be repeated once for credit; (3) completion of an honors thesis and an accompanying presentation, both of which must be approved by a committee consisting of the research supervisor and another faculty member; (4) a University grade point average of at least 3.00, a grade point average in Nutrition 379H of at least 3.00, and a grade point average of at least 3.50 in coursework in the Department of Human Ecology that is required for the degree and for honors; and (5) completion at the University of at least sixty semester hours of coursework counted toward the degree.

Rationale: To provide a more rigorous honors program.


In Chapter 9 of The Undergraduate Catalog, 2000-2002, on page 401, in the section ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES, under the heading HONORS, insert the following after the section PHYSICS HONORS PROGRAM:

TEXTILES AND APPAREL HONORS PROGRAM

Majors who plan to seek special honors in textiles and apparel should apply to the Departmental Honors Committee for admission to the honors program no later than the beginning of the senior year. The requirements for admission are a University grade point average of at least 3.00 and a grade point average of at least 3.50 in coursework in the Department of Human Ecology that is required for the degree. The requirements for graduation with special honors are (1) all requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Textiles and Apparel; (2) Textiles and Apparel 379H, Honors Tutorial Course; this course may be repeated once for credit; (3) completion of an honors thesis and an accompanying presentation, both of which must be approved by a committee consisting of the research supervisor and another faculty member; (4) a University grade point average of at least 3.00, a grade point average in Textiles and Apparel 379H of at least 3.00, and a grade point average of at least 3.50 in coursework in the Department of Human Ecology that is required for the degree and for honors; and (5) completion at the University of at least sixty semester hours of coursework counted toward the degree.


Rationale: To provide a more rigorous honors program.


In Chapter 9 of The Undergraduate Catalog, 2000-2002, on pages 423-424, in the section DEGREES, make the following changes:

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND FAMILY SCIENCES

This degree program is designed to provide both a knowledge base and practical experience in working with children and families in a variety of settings. The curriculum allows the student to gain knowledge of developmental theory and research and of strategies for designing programs for children and families.

Career opportunities are varied, depending on selection of electives and supplemental experiences, and include teaching in a private preschool program and positions in local, state, and federal agencies, demonstration programs concerned with children and families, and hospitals with a children's unit. The curriculum also provides a foundation for graduate study in such fields as human development, family studies, psychology, social work, sociology, special education, [pediatrics] medicine, nursing, physical and occupational therapy, and early childhood education. Such advanced work offers preparation for college teaching, research, and work in public and private agencies serving children and families.


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Students must choose either the human development or the family sciences option.

PRESCRIBED WORK COMMON TO BOTH OPTIONS

1. Rhetoric and Composition 306 and English 316K. In addition, in taking courses to fulfill other degree requirements, the student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component; one of these courses must be upper-division. If the writing requirement is not fulfilled by courses specified for the degree, the student must fulfill it either with electives or with coursework taken in addition to the number of hours required for the degree. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.
2. Students who enter the University with fewer than two high school units in a single foreign language must take the first two semesters in a language without degree credit to remove their language deficiency.
3. Six semester hours of American government, including Texas government; six semester hours of American history; Psychology 301; and six semester hours, at least three of which must be upper-division, chosen from courses in economics, social or cultural anthropology, and psychology. Psychology 304 may not be counted toward this degree.
4. Educational Psychology 371 and three semester hours of mathematics other than Mathematics 301, 302, 316K, and 316L. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 without degree credit to remove their deficiency.
5. Six semester hours of coursework in biology or chemistry; and six additional hours chosen from the following fields: astronomy, biology, chemistry, computer sciences, geological sciences, mathematics, nutrition, and physics. Courses designed for nonscience majors may not be counted toward this requirement; students should consult the Department of Human Ecology for a [complete list of these courses.] list of courses that may be counted.
6. Three semester hours in architecture, art (including art history, design, studio art, visual art studies), classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts, music (including music, instruments, ensemble), philosophy (excluding courses in logic), or theatre and dance.
7. [Students planning to work with infants and young children in a classroom-like setting must choose nine semester hours from courses in applied learning and development. Other students are expected to choose nine] Nine semester hours from an approved list of supporting courses available from the Department of Human Ecology. Students should confer with their advisers about courses appropriate to their career goals.
8. No fewer than thirty-nine but no more than forty-eight semester hours in the Department of Human Ecology, including Human Development and Family Sciences 304, 312, 313, 113L, [322,] 333L, 652F or two sections of 355, 260, and Nutrition 311.
9. At least thirty-six semester hours of upper-division coursework.
10. Eighteen semester hours in the Department of Human Ecology must be completed in residence at the University.
11. Enough additional coursework to make a total of 126 semester hours.

ADDITIONAL PRESCRIBED WORK FOR EACH OPTION

OPTION I: HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

12. Human Development and Family Sciences [316,] 348 (Topic 1: Art and Science), 348 (Topic 2: Music and Literature), 366, 378L, and either 347 or a topic of 378K.

OPTION II: FAMILY SCIENCES

12. Two of the following courses: Human Development and Family Sciences 337, 347, 372K; and nine hours of coursework chosen from Human Development and Family Sciences [316,] 322, 354, 366, 378L, and topics of 378K.

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS

The student must fulfill the University-wide graduation requirements given on pages 17-18 and the college


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requirements given on page 401. He or she must also make a grade of at least C in each course used to fulfill requirements 7, 8, and 12 of the prescribed work above [(with the exception of Human Development and Family Sciences 652F, which is offered only on the pass/fail basis)].

Rationale: Delete HDF 322 as a required course for all human development and family sciences majors: catalog error correction. HDF (C D) 366 was taught until fall, 1998 as a four hour per week placement at the UT Child and Family Lab. It was made lower-division to allow more students access to the class. The faculty experimented with replacing it with a lower-division course (HDF 316), but students were not prepared for the interaction skill level necessary to successfully complete the course. The faculty believe that upper-division status is needed. The students need to have the appropriate and necessary knowledge and theory to be able to maturely handle interactions with fifteen preschoolers, work independently of the master teacher, and understand advanced child development principles. Because these students are working directly with children, it is imperative that they be academically prepared to learn and apply the skills and theory taught in HDF 366. HDF 652F is now offered on a letter-grade basis only.


In Chapter 9 of The Undergraduate Catalog, 2000-2002, on pages 426-429, in the section DEGREES, make the following changes:

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NUTRITION

{No change to introductory text.}

SEQUENCE A

{No change to introductory text.}

Prescribed Work

{No change to requirements 1 through 3.}

4. Three semester hours of [computer sciences or] statistics chosen from Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Educational Psychology 371, [Management Information Systems 310,] and Mathematics 316; and Mathematics 305G or 408C. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 without degree credit to remove their deficiency.

{No change to requirements 5 through 11; no change to the section "Special Requirements."}

SEQUENCE B

{No change to introductory text.}

Prescribed Work

{No change to requirements 1 through 3.}

4. Three semester hours of [computer sciences or] statistics chosen from Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Educational Psychology 371, [Management Information Systems 310,] and Mathematics 316; and Mathematics 305G or 408C. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 without degree credit to remove their deficiency.


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{No change to requirements 5 through 9; no change to the section "Special Requirements."}

OPTION II: COORDINATED PROGRAM IN DIETETICS

{No change to introductory text.}

PRESCRIBED WORK

{No change to requirements 1 through 3.}

4. Three semester hours of [computer sciences or] statistics chosen from Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Educational Psychology 371, [Management Information Systems 310,] and Mathematics 316; and Mathematics 305G or 408C. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 without degree credit to remove their deficiency.

{No further changes.}

Rationale: Reference to computer sciences is deleted because there are no computer sciences courses that teach statistics that are available to our students. MIS 310 is deleted because it, also, is not available to our students. They can only take MIS 310F, a more basic/descriptive course. Neither course specifically addresses statistics.


In Chapter 9 of The Undergraduate Catalog, 2000-2002, on pages 432-434, in the section DEGREES, make the following changes:

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN TEXTILES AND APPAREL

OPTION I: APPAREL DESIGN AND CONSERVATION

[This option emphasizes the application of selected principles from the arts, the sciences, and the humanities and provides specialized instruction for professional careers in textiles and clothing. Intended for students planning to enter the apparel industry, the design concentration focuses on fields such as apparel design, pattern making, sample making, and fashion coordination. Careers related to the conservation concentration include textile and apparel museum positions, conservation, laboratory work, preservation, and exhibition of textiles and apparel.]

This option, which incorporates principles from the arts, the sciences, and the humanities, is intended to prepare students for professional careers in textiles and apparel. The apparel design specialization provides instruction in designing and coordinating fashions and making patterns and samples for the apparel industry. The conservation specialization emphasizes textile properties and chemistry, especially as they affect the preservation, conservation, and exhibition of textiles and apparel in museums and other collections.

PRESCRIBED WORK

1. Rhetoric and Composition 306, English 316K, and three additional semester hours in either English or rhetoric and composition. In addition, in taking courses to fulfill other degree requirements, the student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component; one of these courses must be upper-division. If the writing requirement is not fulfilled by courses specified for the degree, the student must fulfill it either with electives or with coursework taken in addition to the number of hours required for the degree. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.
2. Students who enter the University with fewer than two high school units in a single foreign language must take the first two semesters in a language without degree credit to remove their language deficiency.
3. Six semester hours of American government, including Texas government; six hours of American history; six hours of lower-division coursework in anthropology, economics, psychology, or sociology; and six


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  hours of upper-division coursework in American studies, anthropology, folklore, psychology, or sociology. Students specializing in conservation must take six hours of anthropology in fulfilling this requirement.
4. Three semester hours of mathematics beyond Mathematics 301. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics 301 may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students in the conservation specialization must complete Mathematics 305G.
5. Three semester hours in chemistry, biology, or physics, and the following coursework:
a. For the apparel design specialization: Biology 309D and Chemistry 313N and 113P.
b. For the conservation specialization: Chemistry 301, 302, 204, 610A, and a one-semester organic chemistry laboratory.
6. Accounting 311; two of the following courses: Marketing 337, Management 325, 336, 337; and [either Management Information Systems 310 or] a three-semester-hour course in statistics. Suggested statistics courses are Educational Psychology 371, Mathematics 316, and Statistics 309.
7. Three semester hours of art studio (for the apparel design specialization) or Art History 303 (for the conservation specialization), and nine semester hours of upper-division coursework in art history, museum courses, or studio art.
8. No fewer than forty-six but no more than forty-eight semester hours in the Department of Human Ecology, including[:] the following coursework. Eighteen hours of the coursework used to fulfill this requirement must be completed in residence at the University.
[a. Human Development and Family Sciences 322.
[b. Textiles and Apparel 319.
[c. Textiles and Apparel 205, 105L, 325L, 325M, 260L, 260M, and 352D.
[ d. Six or seven semester hours chosen from Textiles and Apparel 212K, 212L, 316L, and 316Q. Students in the apparel design specialization must complete Textiles and Apparel 212K and 212L.
[e. Twelve semester hours chosen from Textiles and Apparel 315K, 126 and 226L, 355C, 355D, 164K (Topic 1: Flat Pattern) and 264L (Topic 1: Flat Pattern), 164K (Topic 2: Draping) and 264L (Topic 2: Draping), 164K (Topic 3: Advanced Apparel Design) and 264L (Topic 3: Advanced Apparel Design). Students in the apparel design specialization must complete topics 1, 2, and 3 of Textiles and Apparel 164K and 264L. Students in the conservation specialization must complete Textiles and Apparel 355D.
[f. Six semester hours chosen from Textiles and Apparel 327, 328, 355N, and 376.]
a. Human Development and Family Sciences 322 and Textiles and Apparel 205, 105L, 319, 325L, 325M, 352D, 260L, and 260M.
b. For the conservation specialization:
1. Six or seven semester hours chosen from Textiles and Apparel 212K, 212L, 316L, and 316Q.
2. Textiles and Apparel 355D.
3. Twelve semester hours chosen from Textiles and Apparel 315K, 126 and 226L, 355C, 164K (Topic 1: Flat Pattern) and 264L (Topic 1: Flat Pattern), 164K (Topic 2: Draping) and 264L (Topic 2: Draping), 164K (Topic 3: Advanced Apparel Design) and 264L (Topic 3: Advanced Apparel Design).
4. Three semester hours chosen from Textiles and Apparel 327, 328, 355N, and 376.
c. For the apparel design specialization:
1. Textiles and Apparel 212K and 212L.
2. Textiles and Apparel 316L.
3. Textiles and Apparel 126 and 226L, 355C, 164K (Topic 1: Flat Pattern) and 264L (Topic 1: Flat Pattern), 164K (Topic 2: Draping) and 264L (Topic 2: Draping), 164K (Topic 3: Advanced Apparel Design) and 264L (Topic 3: Advanced Apparel Design).
4. Three semester hours chosen from Textiles and Apparel 327, 328, 355D, 355N, and 376.

[Information is available in the department advising office about the courses that are recommended for each specialization.
    [Eighteen hours of the coursework used to fulfill this requirement must be completed in residence at the University.]
9. Thirty-six semester hours of upper-division coursework, of which at least eighteen must be within and at least twelve must be outside the Department of Human Ecology.


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10. Enough additional coursework to make a total of 126 semester hours.

{No change to the sections "Special Requirements" and "Order and Choice of Work."}

OPTION II: RETAIL MERCHANDISING

{No change to introductory text.}

PRESCRIBED WORK

{No change to requirements 1 through 3.}

4. Mathematics [403K] 303D and three semester hours of computer sciences or statistics. Suggested statistics courses are Educational Psychology 371, Mathematics 316, Psychology 317, and Statistics 309. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 without degree credit to remove their deficiency.

{No further changes.}

Rationale: Mathematics 403K will no longer be offered. Mathematics 303D is appropriate for the Retail Merchandising program with emphasis on finance, statistics, and probability.