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DOCUMENTS OF THE GENERAL FACULTY

PROPOSED CHANGES CONCERNING COMPUTER SCIENCES IN THE COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES CHAPTER OF THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 2000-2002

Dean Mary Ann Rankin filed with the secretary of the Faculty Council the following proposed changes concerning computer sciences in the College of Natural Sciences chapter of The Undergraduate Catalog. The dean submitted the proposed changes to the secretary on November 27, 2001, indicating that the departments in the College of Natural Sciences, as well as the College of Natural Sciences Course and Curriculum Committee approved them. The secretary has classified this proposal as legislation of exclusive application and primary interest to a single college or school.

The edited proposal was received from the Office of Official Publications on February 7, 2002, and was sent to the Committee on Undergraduate Degree Program Review from the Office of the General Faculty on February 18, 2002. The committee forwarded the proposed changes to the Office of the General Faculty on March 1, 2002, recommending approval. However, the committee also recommends that as soon as practicable, the colleges consider the option of replacing each requirement of M 408C or M 408D by an equivalent of one or more of the new courses M 408K, M 408L, and M 408M. The authority to grant final approval on behalf of the General Faculty resides with the Faculty Council.

If no objection is filed with the Office of the General Faculty by the date specified below, the legislation will be held to have been approved by the Faculty Council. If objection is filed within the prescribed period, the legislation will be presented to the Faculty Council at its next meeting. The objection, with reasons, must be signed by a member of the Faculty Council.

To be counted, a protest must be received in the Office of the General Faculty by March 13, 2002.


<signed>

John R. Durbin, Secretary
The Faculty Council


This legislation was posted on the Faculty Council web site on March 5, 2002. Paper copies are available on request from the Office of the General Faculty, FAC 22, F9500.


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PROPOSED CHANGES CONCERNING COMPUTER SCIENCES IN THE COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES CHAPTER OF THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 2000-2002

In Chapter 9 of The Undergraduate Catalog, 2000-2002, on page 397, in the section GENERAL INFORMATION, under the heading COLLEGE ACADEMIC PROGRAMS, make the following changes:

THE ELEMENTS OF COMPUTING PROGRAM

The Elements of Computing Program is designed to support computational work in other disciplines and to provide students with skills in the use of computer applications. Any non-computer sciences major with a University grade point average of at least 2.00 may take any elements of computing course for which he or she meets the prerequisite. No application process is required.

Non--computer sciences majors who wish to build a concentration in computing may request certification in the elements of computing. Students who complete the following certification requirements and submit a request to the program director receive a certificate of completion of the program and a letter listing the courses taken. Additional information about the Elements of Computing Program is given at http://www.cs.utexas.edu/users/UTCS/elements/.

The certification requirements are

1. Mathematics 305G with a grade of at least C, or an equivalent score on the SAT II: Mathematics Level IC or Level IIC test.
2. Mathematics 305G with a grade of at least C, or an equivalent score on the SAT II: Mathematics Level IC or Level IIC test. 2. Computer Sciences 303E and 313E, with a grade of at least C in each.
3. Two of the following courses, with a grade of at least C in each: Computer Sciences 323E, 324E, 326E, 327E, 329E.
4. The student must complete at least two long-session semesters in residence.

Rationale: We have added one new elements class, C S 329E. It is a topics course. Topics chosen will be appropriate for an elements certification course.

In Chapter 9 of The Undergraduate Catalog, 2000-2002, on page 398, in the section ADMISSION AND REGISTRATION, make the following changes:

ADMISSION TO THE DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCES

The number of qualified students who want to major in computer sciences exceeds the number who can be adequately instructed by the faculty and accommodated within available facilities. To provide students with the best possible educational experience, the Office of Admissions limits the admission of students to the pre‘computer sciences major, and the Department of Computer Sciences further limits admission to the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science in Computer Sciences degree programs.

Application to the Turing Scholars Program is made by a different process than the one outlined below. The Turing Scholars Program is described on page 399.

THE PRE-COMPUTER SCIENCES MAJOR

Freshman and transfer applicants to the University who wish to major in computer sciences should apply to the pre-computer sciences major. Admission to pre-computer sciences is highly competitive, and the admission requirements are more stringent than those of the University. As a result, a student may be admitted to the University but denied admission to pre-computer sciences. Because even qualified students may be denied admission, every student who applies for admission to the pre-computer sciences major should have an alternate


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major in mind in case the application is denied.

[Students] Freshmen and transfer students from other institutions are admitted to pre-computer sciences only for the fall semester. They are expected to attend Orientation the summer before they enter the University. Current University students may apply for a change of major to pre-computer sciences for either the fall or the spring semester. Deadlines are published by the Department of Computer Sciences at http://www.cs.utexas.edu/users/UTCS/undergradoffice/admissions/changing.html.

Students in the pre-computer sciences major have priority to register for Computer Sciences 307 and 315. Other students may enroll in these courses when space is available. Courses in the major sequence beyond 315 are open only to computer sciences majors.

Pre-computer sciences students who lack either one year of programming in high school or credit for Mathematics 305G (precalculus) will be delayed by at least one semester in completing the basic sequence coursework that is required for admission to the computer sciences major. Students who lack both of these prerequisites are at a disadvantage in completing the basic sequence coursework and may benefit from special programs offered by the University; information about these programs is available in the College of Natural Sciences Transitional Advising Center.

Rationale: The wording did not accurately describe the process by which internal transfers are handled.

ADMISSION TO THE MAJOR IN COMPUTER SCIENCES

To apply for admission to a computer sciences degree program, the student must earn a grade of at least C in each of four basic sequence courses: Computer Sciences 307 and 315, Mathematics 408C, and Philosophy 313K. He or she must also have an overall grade point average in these courses of at least 2.46 and must complete at least two of the courses in residence at the University. These requirements apply both to pre-computer sciences students and to other University students seeking admission to a computer sciences degree program.

Applications are evaluated [at] after the end of each long-session semester [and at the end of the summer] by the Department of Computer Sciences Admission Committee. Students whose applications are denied at either of these times may reapply the following summer. Admission decisions are based on the student's grade point average in the basic sequence courses, his or her University grade point average, and other factors. The grade point averages required for admission vary from semester to semester. Students should consult advisers in the [Computer Sciences] College of Natural Sciences Transitional Advising Center (TrAC) for information about the application process and application deadlines.

Admission to computer sciences degree programs is highly competitive; a student may be denied admission even though he or she meets the coursework and grade point average requirements to apply for admission. Because even qualified students may be denied admission, every student who plans to major in computer sciences should have an alternate major in mind in case the application for admission is denied.

Rationale: The current wording does not accurately describe the process.

In Chapter 9 of The Undergraduate Catalog, 2000-2002, on page 399, in the section ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES, under the heading HONORS, following the DEAN'S SCHOLARS HONORS PROGRAM, make the following addition:

TURING SCHOLARS IN COMPUTER SCIENCES

The Department of Computer Sciences offers a comprehensive honors program for highly motivated and talented students. The key features of the program are an intensive, accelerated path through the core curriculum within the freshman year; a first-semester sophomore-year course that exposes students to significant concepts that are often not encountered until graduate school; special Turing Scholars sections of many advanced computer


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sciences courses; a second-semester sophomore-year course that introduces students to the research activities of the department; and at least two semesters of supervised research and writing. Upon completion of both a sequence of Turing Scholars courses, approved by the program director, and an approved thesis, students graduate as Turing Scholars in Computer Sciences.

Students may enter the program either as freshmen or after they have enrolled at the University. Additional information is available from the Department of Computer Sciences.

Rationale: We have instituted this new program to better educate our top undergraduate computer science majors, who are truly excellent and who deserve special attention because they are likely to be the technical leaders of the future. By significantly revamping the curriculum for these top students, we can challenge them and inspire them in ways that our standard program cannot. A related goal is to attract a larger percentage of the best high school students in Texas.

In Chapter 9 of The Undergraduate Catalog, 2000-2002, on page 406, in the section DEGREES, make the following changes:

Computer Sciences

An undergraduate may not enroll in any computer sciences course more than once without written consent of an undergraduate adviser in computer sciences. No student may enroll in any computer sciences course more than twice. No student may take more than three upper-division computer sciences courses in a semester without written consent of an undergraduate adviser in computer sciences.

Major: Computer Sciences 307, 310 or 310H, 315 or 315H, 328 or 337 or 337H, 336 or 336H, 341 or 341H, 352 or 352H, 372 or 372H, and at least twelve additional semester hours of approved upper-division coursework in computer sciences.0 Computer Sciences 370 may be counted toward the degree only once.

Minor for computer sciences majors: Mathematics 408C, 408D, Philosophy 313K or Computer Sciences 313H, Electrical Engineering 316, and one of the following courses: Mathematics 427K, 328K, 340L, 341, 343K, 343L, 344K, 346, 348, 358K, 362K, 362M, 364K, 364L, 367K, 372K, 373K, 374G, 374K, 474M, 376C, 378K.

To enroll in any computer sciences course numbered above 336, except 349, all students must have completed the following courses with a grade of at least C in each: Computer Sciences 307, 310 or 310H, 315, [328,] 336 or 336H, Mathematics 408C and 408D (or equivalent courses), and Philosophy 313K or Computer Sciences 313H. A grade of at least C is required in all courses counted toward the major and minor requirements.

footnote:
0. Computer sciences courses with numbers ending in H are intended for students in the Turing Scholars Program. Students outside the program may enroll in them only with the special consent of the honors director.

Rationale: We have substantially augmented the list of mathematics classes that we believe should be acceptable to satisfy the mathematics requirement. The honors courses (XXXH) were added to accommodate the Turing Scholars Program.


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In Chapter 9 of The Undergraduate Catalog, 2000-2002, on pages 416-417, in the section DEGREES, make the following changes:

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTER SCIENCES

The Bachelor of Science in Computer Sciences degree program provides a strong technical background for students planning to begin careers upon graduation and for those interested in graduate study in computer sciences. This program allows students to take more coursework in computer sciences and related technical areas than does the Bachelor of Arts degree program.

PRESCRIBED WORK

1. Rhetoric and Composition 306 and English 316K. In addition, in taking courses to fulfill other degree requirements, the student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component; one of these courses must be upper-division. If the writing requirement is not fulfilled by courses specified for the degree, the student must fulfill it either with electives or with coursework taken in addition to the number of hours required for the degree. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.
2. Proficiency in a foreign language equivalent to that shown by the completion of three semesters of college coursework. For students who enter the University with fewer than two high school units in a single foreign language, the first two semesters in a language may not be counted toward the total number of hours requiredSix semester hours of American history. for the degree.
3. Six semester hours of American history.
4. Six semester hours of American government, including Texas government.
5. Three semester hours in psychology, anthropology, economics, sociology, geography, or linguistics (excluding Linguistics 340).
6. One of the following sequences of six to nine semester hours of coursework[, including a laboratory component if appropriate]:
a. Chemistry 301, 302, and 204.
b. Biology 211, 212, and either 213 or 214; and one of the following courses: Biology 205L, 206L, and 208L.
c. Geological Sciences 401 and either 404C or 405.
d. Physics: Physics 315 and an upper-division course approved by the undergraduate adviser.
e. Mathematics: Two of the following courses: Mathematics 427K, 427L, 328K, 343K or 373K, 343L, 344K, 346, 348, 358K, 361, 361K, 362K, 362M, 364K, 364L, 365C, 367K, 372, 372K, 373K, 373L, [and] 374, 374G, 374K, 474M, 376C, and 378K. Other mathematics courses may be used with the approval of the undergraduate adviser. A course may not be counted toward both requirement 6 and requirement 8.
f. Electrical Engineering [411 and] 313 and 331K.
7. Three semester hours in architecture, art (including art history, design, studio art, visual art studies), classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts, music (including music, instruments, ensemble), philosophy (excluding courses in logic), or theatre and dance. Courses in computer programming may not be used to fulfill this requirement.
8. Mathematics 408C, 408D, 340L or 341, and one of the following: Mathematics 427K, 328K, 343K, 343L, 344K, 346, 348, 358K, 362K, 362M, 364K, 364L, 367K, 372K, 373K, 374G, 374K, 474M, 376C, 378K. A course may not be counted toward both requirement 6 and requirement 8. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 without degree credit to remove their deficiency.
9. Either Physics 303K, 303L, 103M, and 103N; or Physics 301, 101L, 316, and 116L.
10. Philosophy 313K or Computer Sciences 313H.5a
11. Electrical Engineering 316.
12. At least forty-two semester hours in computer sciences, consisting of Computer Sciences 307, 310 or 310H, 315 or 315H, 328 or 337 or 337H, 336 or 336H, 341 or 341H, 345 or 345H, 352 or 352H, 372 or 372H, and fifteen additional hours of approved upper-division coursework. 5a
13. At least forty-two semester hours of upper-division coursework.


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14. At least eighteen semester hours of upper-division coursework in computer sciences must be completed in residence at the University.
15. 15. Enough additional coursework to make a total of 130 semester hours.

footnote:
5a. Computer sciences courses with numbers ending in H are intended for students in the Turing Scholars Program. Students outside the program may enroll in them only with the special consent of the honors director.

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS

The student must fulfill the University-wide graduation requirements given on pages 17–18 and the college requirements given on page 401. He or she must also make a grade of at least C in each course used to fulfill requirements 8, 10, 11, and 12 of the prescribed work above [and in Philosophy 313K and Electrical Engineering 316].

To enroll in any computer sciences course numbered above 336, all students must have completed the following courses with a grade of at least C in each: Computer Sciences 307, 310 or 310H, 315 or 315H, 328, 336 or 336H, Mathematics 408C and 408D (or equivalent courses), and Philosophy 313K or Computer Sciences 313H.

An undergraduate may not enroll in any computer sciences course more than once without written consent of an undergraduate adviser in computer sciences. No student may enroll in any computer sciences course more than twice. No student may take more than three upper-division computer sciences courses in a semester without written consent of an undergraduate adviser in computer sciences.

ORDER AND CHOICE OF WORK

The student must consult the faculty adviser each semester regarding order and choice of work.

Rationale: We have substantially augmented the list of mathematics classes that we believed should be acceptable to satisfy the mathematics requirement. The honors courses (XXXH) were added to accommodate the Turing Scholars Program.