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DOCUMENTS OF THE GENERAL FACULTY

PROPOSED CHANGES TO THE SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE CHAPTER OF THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 2000-2002

Dean Frederick Steiner of the School of Architecture filed with the secretary of the Faculty Council the following proposed changes to the School of Architecture chapter of The Undergraduate Catalog, 2000-2002. The dean and the faculty of the school approved the proposed changes in the spring of 2001, and they were submitted to the secretary on October 22, 2001. The secretary has classified this proposal as legislation of exclusive application and primary interest to a single college or school.

The edited proposal was received from the Office of Official Publications on November 12, 2001, and was sent to the Committee on Undergraduate Degree Program Review from the Office of the General Faculty on November 14, 2001. The committee forwarded them to the Office of the General Faculty on November 29, 2001, recommending approval. The authority to grant final approval on behalf of the General Faculty resides with the Faculty Council.

If no objection is filed with the Office of the General Faculty by the date specified below, the legislation will be held to have been approved by the Faculty Council. If objection is filed within the prescribed period, the legislation will be presented to the Faculty Council at its next meeting. The objection, with reasons, must be signed by a member of the Faculty Council.

To be counted, a protest must be received in the Office of the General Faculty by December 14, 2001.


<signed>

John R. Durbin, Secretary
The Faculty Council



This legislation was posted on the Faculty Council web site (http://www.utexas.edu/faculty/council/) on December 3, 2001. Paper copies are available on request from the Office of the General Faculty, FAC 22, F9500.


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PROPOSED CHANGES TO THE SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE CHAPTER OF THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 2000-2002

 

On page 23 in the section ADMISSION AND REGISTRATION, after the heading REGISTRATION make the following changes:

REGISTRATION FOR ADVANCED [ARCHITECTURAL] DESIGN COURSES

To register for advanced design courses, a student seeking the Bachelor of Architecture degree or the Bachelor of Science in Interior Design degree must have completed all of the work prescribed for the preceding years, with the exception of electives, and must satisfy the third-year portfolio requirement. The student must have a University grade point average of at least 2.50 and must meet the prerequisite for each course.

THIRD-YEAR PORTFOLIO REQUIREMENT

All students, whether continuing in or transferring to the School of Architecture, must obtain written authorization from the office of the associate dean for undergraduate programs to enter advanced design courses. Authorization is gained by submitting to the faculty a satisfactory portfolio. This portfolio should summarize the student?s work completed in design and visual communication courses. Supplementary material that will provide useful information to the reviewing committee in evaluating the student?s progress toward [the Bachelor of Architecture] the degree may also be included. The portfolio is submitted by continuing architecture students at the beginning of the second semester of the third year, by interior design students at the end of the second semester of the third year, and by transfer students before they register for any design studio beyond Architecture 310K. Guidelines for submission of the portfolio, including the submission deadline, are [provided to first-semester third-year students; they are also] available from the office of the associate dean for undergraduate programs.

The reviewing committee, at its discretion, may require a student to take additional coursework before being permitted to register for advanced design courses or may require the student to undertake specific courses in the [fourth and fifth] remaining years.

On page 25 in the section DEGREES, after the heading BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE make the following changes:

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

CURRICULUM

COURSES

SEMESTER
 HOURS


Major Sequence Courses

Design: Architecture 310K, 310L, 320K, 520L, 530T, 560R (taken three times), 560T;
Visual communication: Architecture 311K, 311L, 221K, 361T;
Professional practice: Architecture 362;
Design theory: Architecture 231T, 350R;
Site design: Architecture 333;
Environmental controls: Architecture 334K, 334L;
Construction: Architecture 415K, 415L, 435K, 435L, 335M;
History and theory: Architecture 308, 318K, 318L, 328, 368R (taken twice)
104
  Community and Regional Planning 369K
3

Other Required Courses

 
Rhetoric and Composition 306, English 316K
6

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  Government 310L, 312L
6
  [American history] History 315K, 315 0
6
  Mathematics 408C
4
  Physics 302K, 302L, 102M, 102N
8
  Approved upper-division humanities elective in [language,] literature,
    foreign language, [or] philosophy, or another field approved by the office of the associate dean for undergraduate programs
3
  Approved natural science elective
3
  Approved social science elective
3
  Electives approved by the associate dean
12
  Electives open to the student?s choice
9
 
  TOTAL
167


On page 30 in the section DEGREES, after the heading BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE AND BACHELOR OF ARTS, PLAN II make the following changes:

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE AND BACHELOR OF ARTS, PLAN II

{no changes to first four paragraphs}

CURRICULUM

COURSES

SEMESTER
 HOURS


Architecture  
  Design: Architecture 310K, 310L, 320K, 520L, 530T, 560R (taken three times), 560T;
Visual communication: Architecture 311K, 311L, 221K, 361T;
Professional practice: Architecture 362;
Design theory: Architecture 231T, 350R;
Site design: Architecture 333;
Environmental controls: Architecture 334K, 334L;
Construction: Architecture 415K, 415L, 435K, 435L, 335M;
History and theory: Architecture 308, 318K, 318L, 328, 368R (taken twice)
104
Community and Regional Planning 369K
3
English 603 or Tutorial Course 603 3
6
Foreign language 506, 507, 312K, and 312L, or an equivalent sequence
16
Government 310L, 312L
6
[American history] History 315K, 315L 3a
6
Mathematics 408C
4
Philosophy 610Q
6
Physics 302K, 302L, 102M, 102N (or 303K, 303L, 103M, 103N)
8
Social Science 301
3
Tutorial Course 301, 357 (taken twice), 359T
12

Approved upper-division humanities elective in [language,] literature,

  foreign language, [or] philosophy, or another field approved by the office of the associate dean for undergraduate programs
3
Science courses prescribed by the Plan II Committee
6
Electives in the College of Liberal Arts prescribed by the Plan II Committee 4
9
    TOTAL
192


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On page 32 in the section DEGREES, after the heading BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES make the following changes:

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES

{no changes to first three paragraphs}

CURRICULUM

COURSES

SEMESTER
 HOURS


Architecture  
  Design: Architecture 310K, 310L, 320K, 520L, 530T, 560R;
Visual communication: Architecture 311K, 311L, 221K;
Design theory: Architecture 231T, 350R;
Site design: Architecture 333;
Environmental controls: Architecture 334K, 334L;
Construction: Architecture 415K, 415L, 435K, 435L;
History and theory: Architecture 308, 318K, 318L, 328
74
Rhetoric and Composition 306, English 316K
6
Government 310L, 312L
6
[American history] History 315K, 315L 4a
6
Mathematics 408C
4
Physics 302K, 302L, 102M, 102N (or 303K, 303L, 103M, 103N)
8
Approved upper-division humanities elective in [language,] literature,
  foreign language, or philosophy, or another field approved by the office of the associate dean for undergraduate programs
3
Electives in natural sciences, other than courses in the Department of Human
Ecology (at least three hours); social sciences (at least three hours);
philosophy (at least three hours); and fine arts, business, engineering,
foreign language, or architecture theory 5
18
    TOTAL
125



On pages 34-35 in the section DEGREES, after the heading BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INTERIOR DESIGN make the following changes:

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INTERIOR DESIGN

The first year of this degree program is designed to give the student conceptual knowledge and skills, especially in critical thinking. The second year is intended to lay a foundation of knowledge in design, history, structure, technology, and environmental controls, on which the student builds in the third year. The final year emphasizes synthesis, specialization, and the challenge of creating interiors that improve the quality of life.

CURRICULUM
COURSES
SEMESTER
 HOURS

Architectural Interior Design, Architecture  
  Design: Architectural Interior Design 310K, 310L, 320K, [520L] 320L, 530K,
[530L] 530T, 560R (taken twice)[, Architecture 310K, 310L];
Visual communication: Architectural Interior Design [301,] 311K, 211L,
221K, 221L [Architecture 311K, 311L];

 

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  Design theory: Architectural Interior Design 338, [350R,] 268;
[Building] Interior building systems and construction: Architecture 415K,
Architectural Interior Design 325L, [334K] 434K, [334L] 355R;
[Construction: Architectural Interior Design 335, Architecture 415K;]
Professional practice: Architectural Interior Design 362[, 263];
History and theory: Architectural Interior Design 318K, [318L,] 318M,
350R, 368R, Architecture [308, 318L,] 328
Environmental controls: Architecture 334L
[84] 81
Rhetoric and Composition 306, English 316K
6
Government 310L, 312L
6
[American history] History 315K, 315L 5a
6
Mathematics 408C
4
Physics 302K, 302L, 102M, 102N
8
Psychology 301
3
Architecture [368R or an upper-division course in art history] 318L or
  Art History 303 5b
3
Art History 302 or 303
3
[Natural science elective]
[3]
[Approved environmental elective]
[3]
Electives
6
  TOTAL
126

Writing requirement. In addition to Rhetoric and Composition 306 and English 316K, each student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component. One course must be upper-division. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule. Courses used to fulfill the writing requirement may also be counted toward other requirements for the degree.

Practical fieldwork. Between the third and fourth years of the program, each student must complete a summer internship of at least 126 hours with an interior design firm. This requirement is designed to provide the student with firsthand knowledge of various aspects of interior design practice and with the opportunity to develop and refine both design abilities and business skills. Placement assistance is provided by the office of the associate dean for undergraduate [studies] programs. No course credit is awarded for the internship.

SUGGESTED ARRANGEMENT OF COURSES

First Year — Fall Semester
COURSES
SEMESTER
 HOURS

[ARC 308, Architecture and Society]
[3]
[ARC] ARI 310K, Design I
3
[ARC] ARI 311K, Visual Communication I
3
ARI 318K, Interiors and Society
3
M 408C, Differential and Integral Calculus
4
[RHE 306, Rhetoric and Composition]
[3]
PHY 302K, General Physics—Technical Course: Mechanics, Heat, and Sound
3
PHY 102M, Laboratory for Physics 302K
1
  TOTAL
[16] 17


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First Year — Spring Semester
COURSES
SEMESTER
 HOURS

[ARC] ARI 310L, Design II—Interiors
3
[ARC 311L] ARI 211L, Visual Communication II
[3] 2
[ARI 335, Interior Materials and Finishes]
[3]
ARH 302, Survey of Ancient through Medieval Art, or 303, Survey of
  Renaissance through Modern Art
3
[PHY 302K, General Physics—Technical Course: Mechanics, Heat, and Sound]
[3]
[PHY 102M, Laboratory for Physics 302K]
[1]
[PSY 301, Introduction to Psychology]
[3]
PHY 302L, General Physics—Technical Course: Electricity and Magnetism,
  Light, Atomic and Nuclear Physics
3
PHY 102N, Laboratory for Physics 302L
1
RHE 306, Rhetoric and Composition
3
  TOTAL
[16] 15

Second Year — Fall Semester
COURSES
SEMESTER
 HOURS

ARI 320K, [Interior Design III] Design III—Interiors
3
ARI 221K, Visual Communication III
2
[ARI 334K, Interior Building Systems I]
[3]
[ARI 318L, History of Interior Design and Furnishings I]
[3]
ARC 415K, Construction I
4
ARC 318L, History of Architecture, Survey II, or ARH 303, Survey of
  Renaissance through Modern Art
3
[PHY 302L, General PhysicsaeTechnical Course: Electricity and Magnetism,
  Light, Atomic and Nuclear Physics]
[3]
[PHY 102N, Laboratory for Physics 302L]
[1]
PSY 301, Introduction to Psychology
3
  TOTAL
[16] 15

Second Year — Spring Semester
COURSES
SEMESTER
 HOURS

ARI [520L, Interior Design IV] 320L, Design IV—Interiors
[5] 3
[ARI 301, Computer Applications in Interior Design]
[3]
ARI 318M, [History of Interior Design and Furnishings II] Interior Design History and Theory I
3
ARI 221L, Visual Communication IV—Computer Design
2
ARI 325L, Construction II
3
ARC 328, History of Architecture, Survey III
3
E 316K, Masterworks of Literature
3
  TOTAL
17


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Third Year — Fall Semester
COURSES
SEMESTER
 HOURS

ARI 530K, [Interior Design V] Design V—Interiors
5
[ARI 318K, Interior Design Theory and Issues]

[3]

ARI 434K, Construction III
4
ARI 368R, Interior Design History and Theory II
3
ARI 338, Designing for Human Behavior
3
[ARI 362, Interior Design Practice]
[3]
[ARC 415K, Construction I]
[4]
  TOTAL
15

Third Year — Spring Semester
COURSES
SEMESTER
 HOURS

[ARI 530L, Interior Design VI]
[5]
[ARI 334L, Interior Building Systems II]
[3]
[ARI 263, Integrated Interior Systems]
[2]
[ARC 368R, Topics in the History of Architecture,
  or an upper-division art history course]
[3]
[American history]
[3]
ARC 334L, Environmental Controls II
3
ARI 530T, Design VIaeInteriors
5
ARI 355R, Color, Sound, Light
3
Open elective
3
  TOTAL
[16] 14

Fourth Year ae Fall Semester
COURSES
SEMESTER
 HOURS

ARI 560R, Advanced Interior Design
5
ARI 268, Advanced Studies in Interior Design
2
ARI 350R, Topics in Interior Design Theory
3
GOV 310L, American Government
3
[Approved environmental elective 6 ]
[3]
HIS 315K, The United States, 1492-1865 6
3
  TOTAL
[14] 16

Fourth Year ae Spring Semester
COURSES
SEMESTER
 HOURS

ARI 560R, Advanced Interior Design
5
[ARI 268, Advanced Studies in Interior Design]
[2]
ARI 362, Interior Design Practice
3
GOV 312L, Issues and Policies in American Government
3
[American history] HIS 315L, The United States since 1865 6
3
[Natural science] Open elective
3
  TOTAL
17


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Footnotes:

0. Other courses that partially fulfill the legislative requirement for American history may be counted toward this requirement; these courses are identified in the Course Schedule.

3a. Other courses that partially fulfill the legislative requirement for American history may be counted toward this requirement; these courses are identified in the Course Schedule.

4a. Other courses that partially fulfill the legislative requirement for American history may be counted toward this requirement; these courses are identified in the Course Schedule.

5a. Other courses that partially fulfill the legislative requirement for American history may be counted toward this requirement; these courses are identified in the Course Schedule.

5b. Art History 303 may be counted toward only one of these requirements.

[6. This elective must cover

environmental psychology: human factors and must be approved by the associate dean for undergraduate programs.
]

6. Other courses that partially fulfill the legislative requirement for American history may be counted toward this requirement; these courses are identified in the Course Schedule.


Rationale:
The proposed curriculum changes follow from a process begun in 1997, when the Bachelor of Science in Interior Design was moved from the College of Natural Sciences to the School of Architecture. At that time, several changes were made to the interior design program that had consequences for a new curriculum. First, the number of students in the program was severely reduced to sixteen new students per year. This number was in line with what the School of Architecture calculated was possible given the available resources, its own admission standards, as well as a more focused direction (in architectural interiors) that the School, given its strengths, wished the program to take.

Second, only a single tenured faculty member from natural sciences ultimately continued on in architecture. Because the provost?s office committed funding to hire three additional tenure-track faculty members over a three year span, it was decided by the School of Architecture Undergraduate Curriculum Committee that a stop-gap curriculum based on the existing program in natural sciences, as well as model curricula nation-wide, should be put in place; and that a new curriculum should be written over a four year period by an Interior Design Curriculum Committee (the IDCC, duly formed) consisting of new faculty as well as those existing School of Architecture faculty members whose work overlapped with interests in interior design.

The School of Architecture?s initial Bachelor of Science in Interior Design curriculum proposal was approved by the Faculty Council in 1997. It appears in The Undergraduate Catalog, the Course Schedule, and in School of Architecture literature. In essence, this curriculum was the School of Architecture?s best guess at how to balance the requirements of the accredited degree plan with University requirements and its own existing strengths and offerings, while leaving course descriptions broad enough so that new faculty could define these, working with the IDCC.

Over the last four years the values and shortcomings of the curriculum have become clear, and these are considered in the new proposal. The existing and proposed curriculums have much in common. Both consist of 126 credit hours of classes over four years leading to the Bachelor of Science in Interior Design degree. Both consist of a primary sequence of design studio courses (which remain unchanged in the new proposal) and support courses that cover the full range of requirements for professional accreditation.


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The primary differences are as follows:

First, the course descriptions are developed, and understood in relationship to each other. The sequential content of the design studios has been defined, and this has in turn led to a shifting of the timing for support and other courses.

The process of so doing has led to a rationalization (and reduction) in the number of support courses offered in certain areas (the overall interior design construction sequence, for example), while increasing requirements and offerings in others (particularly interior design, architecture, and art history and theory).

Third, a more complete and sensible integration with existing courses in the School of Architecture has been accomplished, reflecting a strong desire on the part of the School to have the Interiors and Architecture programs linked and equivalent. In particular, existing courses, such as (architecture) Construction I, and (architecture) Environmental Controls II have been restructured to place a greater emphasis on interior issues.

Fourth, the IDCC has developed course descriptions for courses not initially imagined in the existing curriculum, but for which a need has arisen given the finer understanding of course content, as well as shortcomings in the way the existing curriculum plays out: ARI 338, Design for Human Behavior, is a good example.

Finally, the sequence of courses has been altered to make sense with the full sequence of courses within the School of Architecture, as well as with respect to University requirements. The overall University requirements are in place, but the sequence of courses is different.

One of the primary objectives of the IDCC has been to make certain that any new curriculum could be put in place with a minimum of disruption for students in the existing curriculum. Working with the program coordinator in the School of Architecture, we have mapped out a precise one-for-one course substitution schedule to insure that there will be no registration or audit problem for students currently in the School.