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DOCUMENTS OF THE GENERAL FACULTY

PROPOSED CHANGES IN THE PROGRAM DEGREE REQUIREMENTS IN THE RED MCCOMBS SCHOOL OF BUSINESS CHAPTER OF THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 2000-2002

Dean Robert G. May of the Red McCombs School of Business filed with the secretary of the Faculty Council the following proposed changes in the program degree requirements in the Red McCombs School of Business chapter of The Undergraduate Catalog, 2000-2002. The dean and the faculty of the school approved and submitted the proposed changes to the secretary on October 31, 2001. The secretary has classified this proposal as legislation of exclusive application and primary interest to a single college or school.

The edited proposal was received from the Office of Official Publications on November 12, 2001, and was sent to the Committee on Undergraduate Degree Program Review from the Office of the General Faculty on December 3, 2001. The committee forwarded the proposed changes to the Office of the General Faculty on December 14, 2001 , recommending approval. The authority to grant final approval on behalf of the General Faculty resides with the Faculty Council.

If no objection is filed with the Office of the General Faculty by the date specified below, the legislation will be held to have been approved by the Faculty Council. If objection is filed within the prescribed period, the legislation will be presented to the Faculty Council at its next meeting. The objection, with reasons, must be signed by a member of the Faculty Council.

To be counted, a protest must be received in the Office of the General Faculty by February 11, 2002.


<signed>

John R. Durbin, Secretary
The Faculty Council



This legislation was posted on the Faculty Council web site on February 4 , 2002. Paper copies are available on request from the Office of the General Faculty, FAC 22, F9500.


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PROPOSED CHANGES IN THE PROGRAM DEGREE REQUIREMENTS IN THE RED MCCOMBS SCHOOL OF BUSINESS CHAPTER OF THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 2000-2002

In Chapter 3, on page 47, in the section PROGRAM DEGREE REQUIREMENTS, under the heading ACCOUNTING, under the subheading PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS IN ACCOUNTING, make the following change:

Admission

Students are admitted to the PPA according to the following requirements. Admission is granted only for the fall semester; June 1 is the application deadline for those who wish to begin the program the following fall. Students interested in the PPA must have met the foreign language requirement for the BBA degree; must have completed at least sixty semester hours of coursework, including Accounting 311 and 312, Business Administration 101, Economics 304K and 304L, [and] Mathematics [403K and 403L] 408K or 408C, and Mathematics 408L or 408D; and must have completed or be registered for Business Administration 102.

{No change to second and third paragraph.}

Rationale: The change in mathematics reflects the proposed change for all business students to requirement 4c on page 45.

In Chapter 3, on page 48, in the section PROGRAM DEGREE REQUIREMENTS, under the heading ENGINEERING ROUTE TO THE BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION, under the subheading ENGINEERING BLOCK OPTIONS, make the following changes:

Manufacturing Engineering

[Mechanical Engineering 218, Engineering Computational Methods]
Mechanical Engineering 311, Materials Engineering
Mechanical Engineering 326, Thermodynamics
Mechanical Engineering 352K, Engineering Computer Graphics
Mechanical Engineering 365L, Industrial Design for Production
Mechanical Engineering 366L, Operations Research Models
Mechanical Engineering 367S, Simulation Modeling
Mechanical Engineering 368J, Computer-Aided Design
Mechanical Engineering 373K, Basic Industrial Engineering
Mechanical Engineering 375K, Production Engineering Management

Rationale: Students who take ME 218 will be short one hour for the required twelve hours in the engineering block option. Thus they will be forced to take an additional course to meet graduation requirements.

ME 334 was renumbered to ME 311 in fall 2000. The course was unintentionally dropped from the catalog. The course material is still valid for this major.

ME 367S and ME 375K are basic skills courses for manufacturing engineers or consultants. The inclusion of these courses for Engineering Route to Business majors has been approved by Dr. Wood.


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In Chapter 3, on page 48, in the section PROGRAM DEGREE REQUIREMENTS, under the heading ENGINEERING ROUTE TO THE BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION, under the subheading ENGINEERING BLOCK OPTIONS, make the following changes:

Mechanical Systems

[Mechanical Engineering 218, Engineering Computational Methods]
Engineering Mechanics 306, Statics
Mechanical Engineering 311, Materials Engineering
Mechanical Engineering 320, Applied Thermodynamics
Mechanical Engineering 324, Kinematics and Dynamics of Mechanical Systems
Mechanical Engineering 326, Thermodynamics
Mechanical Engineering 330, Fluid Mechanics
Mechanical Engineering 336, Materials Processing
Mechanical Engineering 338, Machine Elements
Mechanical Engineering 365L, Industrial Design for Production
Mechanical Engineering 368J, Computer-Aided Design
Mechanical Engineering 373K, Basic Industrial Engineering

Chemical Engineering

Chemical Engineering 317, Introduction to Chemical Engineering Analysis
Chemical Engineering 322, Thermodynamics
[Chemical Engineering 448, Computer Applications in Chemical Engineering]
Chemical Engineering 348, Numerical Methods in Chemical Engineering and Problem Solving
Chemical Engineering 350, Chemical Engineering Materials
Chemical Engineering 353, Transport Phenomena

Rationale: Students who take ME 218 will be short one hour for the required twelve hours in the engineering block option. Thus they will be forced to take an additional course to meet graduation requirements.

EM 306 is a prerequisite for the suggested sequence of courses set by Dr. Anderson. Statics should be basic knowledge for students in the mechanical engineering field. Dr. Anderson has been approving this course as a standard substitution for the last year.

ME 334 was renumbered to ME 311 in fall 2000. The course was unintentionally dropped from the catalog. The course material is still valid for this major.

ME 373K has been approved for Engineering Route to Business students by Dr. Wood, mechanical engineering advisor. This is a solid course for students interested in pursuing plant engineering, and should be an available option.

The Department of Chemical Engineering is replacing CHE 448 with 348.

In Chapter 3, on page 49, in the section PROGRAM DEGREE REQUIREMENTS, under the heading ENGINEERING ROUTE TO THE BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION, under the subheading ENGINEERING BLOCK OPTIONS, make the following changes:

Civil Engineering

Architectural Engineering 320K, Introduction to Design I
Architectural Engineering 320L, Introduction to Design II
Architectural Engineering 323K, Project Management and Economics — required
Architectural Engineering 335, Materials and Methods of Building Construction


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Architectural Engineering 346N, Building Environmental Systems
Architectural Engineering 358, Cost Estimating in Building Construction
Architectural Engineering 366, Contracts, Liability, and Ethics
Civil Engineering 311K, Introduction to Computer Methods
Civil Engineering 311S, Elementary Statistics for Civil Engineers
Civil Engineering 314K, Properties and Behavior of Engineering Materials
Civil Engineering 319F, Elementary Mechanics of Fluids
Civil Engineering 321, Transportation Systems
[Mechanical Engineering 368J, Computer-Aided Design]

Rationale: Dr. Wheat has suggested that CE 311S is critical for students interested in going to work in the public sector as a civil engineering professional.

Dr. Anderson feels that a construction course sequence is necessary. The recommended courses for this sequence include ARE 335 and 358. CE 314K is the prerequisite for ARE 335 and as such is a logical introductory course for the sequence.

Dr. Wheat has suggested that CE 321 is critical for students interested in going to work in the public sector as a civil engineering professional.

ME 368J is being removed because there are two architectural engineering courses (320K and 320L) in the block option that deal with computer aided design in a manner that is more relevant to students interested in that subject area.

In Chapter 3, on page 49, in the section PROGRAM DEGREE REQUIREMENTS, under the heading ENGINEERING ROUTE TO THE BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION, under the subheading ENGINEERING BLOCK OPTIONS, make the following changes:

Computer Engineering

Computer Sciences 307, Foundations of Computer Science
[Computer Sciences 310, Computer Organization and Programming]
Computer Sciences 315, [Computer Science II] Algorithms and Data Structures
Computer Sciences 328, [Abstract Data Types] Advanced Programming
Computer Sciences 336, Analysis of Programs
Electrical Engineering 306, Introduction to Computing
[Electrical Engineering 312, Electrical Engineering Computation]
Electrical Engineering 312, Introduction to Programming, or

  Computer Sciences 310, Computer Organization and Programming — required
Electrical Engineering 313, Linear Systems and Signals
Electrical Engineering 316, [Digital Systems Engineering I] Digital Logic Design
Electrical Engineering 319K, Introduction to Microcontrollers
[Electrical Engineering 331K, Electric Circuits and Electronics, or
  Electrical Engineering 411, Circuit Theory — required]
[Electrical Engineering 335M, Electric Machinery and Magnetic Devices]
Electrical Engineering 360C, Algorithms
Electrical Engineering 360F, Software Engineering Processes
Electrical Engineering 360N, Computer Architecture

Rationale: By combining the previously separate listings for CE 310 and EE 312 into an either/or statement, we can emphasize that these courses are basic knowledge courses required for making valid computer engineering decisions.


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Engineering Route to Business students are required to have 6 hours of upper-division coursework in their engineering block. Students who choose the computer science group of courses currently only have one upper-division computer science course available to them. Dr. Priebe in the Department of Computer Sciences has agreed that Engineering Route to Business students may take this course.

EE 306 is a new course that all electrical engineering students will eventually be required to take. Dr. Cogdell felt that this course will be very important for Engineering Route to Business students with an electrical engineering block option in order to do well in future electrical engineering courses. Dr. Anderson has added it to his recommended course sequence for this block.

None of the recommended course sequences requires EE 331K or EE 411.

EE 335M is no longer being taught.

The electrical engineering and computer engineering blocks were almost identical. To strengthen the computer engineering block, Dr. Anderson and Dr. Cogdell agreed to adding EE 360C, EE 360F, and EE 360N, as they are more specifically computer engineering oriented. Electrical engineering has already agreed that these courses will be made available to Engineering Route to Business majors.

On page 49, in the section PROGRAM DEGREE REQUIREMENTS, under the heading ENGINEERING ROUTE TO THE BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION, under the subheading ENGINEERING BLOCK OPTIONS, make the following changes:

Electrical Engineering

Electrical Engineering 306, Introduction to Computing
Electrical Engineering 312, [Electrical Engineering Computation] Introduction to Programming
Electrical Engineering 313, Linear Systems and Signals
Electrical Engineering 316, [Digital Systems Engineering I] Digital Logic Design
[Electrical Engineering 331K, Electric Circuits and Electronics, or

  Electrical Engineering 411, Circuit Theory — required]
Electrical Engineering 331K, Electric Circuits and Electronics, or
  Electrical Engineering 331, Electrical Circuits, Electronics, and Machinery
required. Electrical Engineering 331K is recommended.

[Electrical Engineering 335M, Electric Machinery and Magnetic Devices]
Electrical Engineering [338] 438, Electronic Circuits I
[Electrical Engineering 368, Electrical Power Transmission and Distribution]
Mechanical Engineering 335M, Electric Machinery and Magnetic Devices

Rationale: EE 306 is a new course that all electrical engineering students will eventually be required to take. Dr. Cogdell felt that this course will be very important for Engineering Route to Business students with an electrical engineering block option in order to do well in future electrical engineering courses. Dr. Anderson has added it to his recommended course sequence for this block.

Neither one of the recommended course sequences requires EE 411. We would like to encourage students to take the EE 331K, as it is more likely to be a prerequisite. Having it as an either/or insinuates that they are equally important.

EE 335M and ME 335M are identical courses. As such, the Electrical Engineering department decided to have the Mechanical Engineering department alone teach the course (per Dr. Cogdell).

The Department of Electrical Engineering is replacing EE 338 with EE 438.

EE 368 is offered only in the spring of odd years. Therefore, it is not practical to have this course on the list of options.


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On page 49, in the section PROGRAM DEGREE REQUIREMENTS, under the heading ENGINEERING ROUTE TO BUSINESS, make the following changes:

BUSINESS BLOCK OPTIONS

[Manufacturing Management] Supply Chain Management

Management 368, [Advanced Operations Management] Supply Chain Management — required
[Upper-division business elective]
[Upper-division business elective]
Management 337, Topic 14: Total Quality Management
Management Information Systems 325, Introduction to Data Management
Marketing 372, Marketing Seminar

Rationale: The Management 368 title has been changed. This course will be required as the content will be the introductory course and the basis for integration of the other business courses.

The operations management faculty, in conjunction with the Supply Chain Consortium business partners, have updated and renamed the manufacturing management block option to be more consistent with present trends in business.