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DOCUMENTS OF THE GENERAL FACULTY

PROPOSED CHANGES TO THE RADIO-TELEVISION-FILM SECTION OF THE COLLEGE OF COMMUNICATION CHAPTER OF THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 2000-2002

Dean Ellen A. Wartella filed with the secretary of the Faculty Council the following proposed changes to the radio-television-film section of the College of Communication chapter of The Undergraduate Catalog. The Administrative Committee of the College approved all changes on October 16, 2001. The dean submitted the proposed changes to the secretary on October 26, 2001. The secretary has classified this proposal as legislation of exclusive application and primary interest to a single college or school.

The edited proposal was received from the Office of Official Publications on January 11, 2002, and was sent to the Committee on Undergraduate Degree Program Review from the Office of the General Faculty on January 14, 2002. The committee forwarded the proposed changes to the Office of the General Faculty on February 1, 2002, recommending approval. The authority to grant final approval on behalf of the General Faculty resides with the Faculty Council.

If no objection is filed with the Office of the General Faculty by the date specified below, the legislation will be held to have been approved by the Faculty Council. If objection is filed within the prescribed period, the legislation will be presented to the Faculty Council at its next meeting. The objection, with reasons, must be signed by a member of the Faculty Council.

To be counted, a protest must be received in the Office of the General Faculty by February 11, 2002.


<signed>

John R. Durbin, Secretary
The Faculty Council



This legislation was posted on the Faculty Council web site on February 4, 2002. Paper copies are available on request from the Office of the General Faculty, FAC 22, F9500.


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PROPOSED CHANGES TO THE RADIO-TELEVISION-FILM SECTION OF THE COLLEGE OF COMMUNICATION CHAPTER OF THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 2000-2002

On pages 80-83, in the section DEGREES, make the following changes:

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN RADIO-TELEVISION-FILM

To be awarded the degree of Bachelor of Science in Radio-Television-Film, the candidate must complete 120 semester hours of coursework and must fulfill the University-wide graduation requirements on pages 17-18, the college graduation requirements on page 68, and the special requirements, prescribed work, and major requirements below.

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS

To enroll in upper-division radio-television-film courses, a student must have a University grade point average of at least 2.25 and a grade point average in courses in the College of Communication of at least 2.00. Students who do not fulfill this requirement will be dropped from upper-division radio-television-film courses, normally before the twelfth class day. The grade point average requirement is waived for the transfer student during the first semester of coursework, while he or she is establishing a University grade point average.

In addition, a student with a major in radio-television-film must have a grade of at least C in each course taken in the College of Communication that is counted toward the degree; if the course is offered on the pass/fail basis only, the student must have a [grade] symbol of CR.

[Consent of the instructor is part of the prerequisite for most upper-division radio-television-film courses. The departmental consent process is described on page 93.]

To enroll in some upper-division radio-television-film courses, the student must earn specific grades in prerequisite courses. In addition, enrollment in some upper-division courses requires the consent of the instructor. The departmental consent process is described on page 93; complete course prerequisites are given on pages 93-98.

It is not recommended that a student majoring in radio-television-film register for more than [twelve] nine semester hours in radio-television-film in one long-session semester or more than [nine] six semester hours in a summer session.

PRESCRIBED WORK

No changes.

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

1. At least thirty but no more than forty-two semester hours of radio-television-film, of which at least eighteen hours must be upper-division. All students must take Radio-Television-Film 305, nine additional hours of lower-division coursework, and two courses chosen from the following: Radio-Television-Film 330K, 331K, 331M, 331N, 331P, 334, 335, 342, 342T, 345, 347C, 348, 359, 365, 365M, 369, and 370.
    Each student may design an individual program to fulfill requirement 1 by choosing from one or more of the principal areas described in the section ÀAreas of Study” below.
2. At least six semester hours of coursework must be taken in the College of Communication but outside the

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  department. However, no student may count toward the degree more than forty-eight hours (including transfer credit) in College of Communication coursework. [Coursework in American Sign Language may not be used to fulfill any major requirement and is not included in the forty-eight hours of coursework in the college that may be counted toward the degree.]
3. No College of Communication course to be counted toward the degree may be taken on the pass/fail basis, unless the course is offered only on that basis.

AREAS OF STUDY

The program in radio-television-film is designed to prepare students for careers in media research, creative writing, and various production fields. It is also intended to train students to analyze the role in society of communication media and technologies.

To meet these goals, the department offers a multidisciplinary curriculum. The three principal areas of study are production/creative studies, screenwriting, and media studies. Students in production/creative studies may focus on film, video, and audio or on [new] convergent media; those in media studies may focus on critical and cultural studies, ethnic and minority studies, gender and sexuality studies, mass communication, international communication, or communication technology and policy.

Each student¡s program of study is planned by the student and the adviser to meet the student¡s academic and professional goals. Since upper-division courses in each area require specific lower-division prerequisites, students should choose their lower-division courses with care. The following are the upper-division radio-television-film courses in each area, and the prerequisite lower-division courses. Complete course prerequisites are given on pages 93-98.

1. Production/creative studies
[a. Film, video, and audio
[1. Intensive production: Radio-Television-Film 333P, 338, 346, 346C, 366, 367K, 367L, 368, and 368S.
[2. Open production: Radio-Television-Film 331L, 337, 337P, 340, 341, 341C, 343, 344, 346, 346C, 351, 351C, 366K, and 367K.]
a. Film, video, and audio: Radio-Television-Film 331L, 337, 337P, 338, 340, 341, 341C, 343, 344, 346, 346C, 351, 351C, 366, 366K, 367K, 367L, 368, and 368S.
    Prerequisite lower-division courses: Radio-Television-Film 305, 317, 318, and three additional semester hours of lower-division coursework in radio-television-film.
    Students who plan to take production courses should be aware that these courses may require five to ten hours of independent production or studio time each week in addition to the class meetings listed in the Course Schedule. All costs of production, such as the cost of film and film processing, actors¡ fees, and location fees, are borne by the student. The cost of most equipment is covered by the college Learning Equipment Fee and the incidental fees assessed for each course.
b. [New] Convergent media: Radio-Television-Film 331Q, 331R, 331S, 331T, and 344M. Prerequisite lower-division courses: Radio-Television-Film 305, [309,] 318, and [three] six additional semester hours [of lower-division coursework in radio-television-film] chosen from Radio-Television-Film 309, 314, 316, and 317.
    [Students interested in new media may study theory and production techniques in Radio-Television-Film 331Q, 331R, 331S, 331T, and 344M. Radio-Television-Film 331Q is a prerequisite for the other four courses; following the completion of 331Q, the courses may be taken in any order.]
2. Screenwriting: Radio-Television-Film 333 and 369. Prerequisite lower-division courses: Radio-Television-Film 305, either 314 or 316, and six additional semester hours of lower-division coursework in radio-

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  television-film.
3. Media studies
a. Critical and cultural studies, ethnic and minority studies, gender and sexuality studies: Radio-Television-Film 331K, 335, 345, 359, 365 (Topic 4: History of United States Latino Media), 365 (Topic 5: Latin American Media), 365 (Topic 7: Narrowcasting), and 370. Prerequisite lower-division courses: Radio-Television-Film 305, either 314 or 316, and six additional semester hours of lower-division coursework in radio-television-film.
b. Mass communication, international communication, and communication technology and policy studies: Radio-Television-Film 330K, 331M, 331N, 331P, 334, 342, 342T, 347C, 348, 365 (Topic 1: Survey Research Methods), 365 (Topic 2: Latino Audiences), 365 (Topic 3: Mass Media and Ethnic Groups), 365 (Topic 6: Latinos and Media), and 365M. Prerequisite lower-division courses: Radio-Television-Film 305 and nine additional semester hours of lower-division coursework in radio-television-film.
4. Options for independent study
Radio-Television-Film 330L, Internship in Film and Electronic Media
Radio-Television-Film 336, Special Projects in Radio-Television-Film
Radio-Television-Film 178, Radio-Television-Film Internship
Radio-Television-Film 378H, Honors Tutorial Course
Prerequisites for these courses vary; they are given later in this chapter and in the Course Schedule.

[ADMISSION TO INTENSIVE COURSES

[Film, video, and audio courses are identified as Àintensive” or Àopen.” Students enter either intensive or open coursework after completing the lower-division requirements described above. Students who wish to enroll in intensive production courses present to a faculty jury a portfolio of appropriate creative work prepared as part of the coursework for Radio-Television-Film 318; on the basis of the portfolio and the student¡s academic performance, the jury decides whether the student may take intensive production courses. Each student in intensive production must take Radio-Television-Film 333P, 338, 366, and 367K; the student may then take additional intensive production courses to refine his or her creative abilities and technical skills.

[After completing the lower-division requirements, students in production/creative studies who are interested in video or audio may choose to take open production courses. Although consent of the instructor may be required for enrollment in these courses, there is no jury process.]

ORDER AND CHOICE OF WORK

No changes.

Rationale: American Sign Language is now taught in the College of Liberal Arts. A general statement that American Sign Language may not be counted toward the major requirements is listed under the section titled "Applicability of Certain Courses."

In making the changes to the Undergraduate Catalog, the Department of Radio-Television-Film is responding to student and faculty concerns that the previous curriculum was too limiting for many students who wanted to gain a variety of skills while in the Department.

Instead of a consent process for production courses, a grade of ÀB” or better in RTF 317 Narrative Strategies and 318 Introduction to Image and Sound is now required. Students will be able to move on to more advanced


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courses based on their academic performance in introductory production courses and on the seniority system built into TEX.

Approximately the same number of students will be accommodated, but they will have increased flexibility in gaining a wider variety of skills.

Admission into introductory production classes will be based on the student's performance in classes that draw on a variety of talents and skills (RTF 317, RTF 318), rather than solely upon a portfolio of limited work.

The title of ÀNew Media” no longer reflects the goals and focus of the program. ÀConvergent Media” is a more applicable name for this area of study.

The term "convergent" applies to technologies and their evolution / consolidation but also to more traditional media and the effect technologies have on their continually evolving relationship to each other. Convergent Media takes into account the effect of one medium on another and acknowledges the continued interplay of analog and digital systems.