Click here to view document in portable document format (PDF )
1920


DOCUMENTS OF THE GENERAL FACULTY

CHANGES IN THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING CHAPTER OF THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 2000-2002 — Part One

Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Neal E. Armstrong of the College of Engineering filed with the secretary of the Faculty Council the following proposed changes to the College of Engineering chapter of The Undergraduate Catalog, 2000-2002. These changes were approved by the College of Engineering faculty on Friday, September 21, 2001. The secretary has classified this proposal as legislation of exclusive application and primary interest to a single college or school.

The initial edited proposal was received from the Office of Official Publications on January 17, 2002, and was sent to the Committee on Undergraduate Degree Program Review from the Office of the General Faculty on January 28, 2002. The committee postponed consideration of the changes pending receipt of rationale. A corrected version of the legislation was received from Official Publications on March 7, 2002, and was sent to the committee on March 18, 2002. The committee forwarded the proposed changes to the Office of the General Faculty on April 2, 2002, recommending approval. The authority to grant final approval on behalf of the General Faculty resides with the Faculty Council.

If no objection is filed with the Office of the General Faculty by the date specified below, the legislation will be held to have been approved by the Faculty Council. If objection is filed within the prescribed period, the legislation will be presented to the Faculty Council at its next meeting. The objection, with reasons, must be signed by a member of the Faculty Council.

To be counted, a protest must be received in the Office of the General Faculty by April 10, 2002.


<signed>


John R. Durbin, Secretary
The Faculty Council


This legislation was posted on the Faculty Council web site on April 3, 2002. Paper copies are available on request from the Office of the General Faculty, FAC 22, F9500. Official Publications submitted corrections on May 14, 2002, which were approved by the Office of the Provost on May 28, 2002. The changes have been incorporated into the document.


1921


CHANGES IN THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING CHAPTER OF THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 2000-2002 — Part One

The changes set forth below are proposed for the College of Engineering in The Undergraduate Catalog, 2000-2002, of The University of Texas at Austin.

On page 149 of The Undergraduate Catalog, 2000-2002, in the section DEGREES, make the following changes:

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING

{No change to introductory text.}

CURRICULUM

Course requirements are divided into three categories: basic sequence courses, major sequence courses, and other required courses. Enrollment in major sequence courses is restricted to students who have received credit for all of the basic sequence courses and have been admitted to the major sequence by the College of Engineering Admissions Committee. (Requirements for admission to a major sequence are given on pages 130-131.) Enrollment in other required courses is not restricted by completion of the basic sequence.

Courses used to fulfill technical and nontechnical elective requirements must be approved by the chemical engineering faculty before the student enrolls in them. Courses that fulfill the social science and fine arts/humanities requirements are listed on pages 139-140.

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING/BIOLOGY DUAL DEGREE PROGRAM

A limited number of very strongly motivated students whose high school class standing and admission test scores indicate strong academic potential are admitted into the dual degree program in biology and chemical engineering. Graduates earn both the Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering and the Bachelor of Science in Biology. The program is offered jointly by the Colleges of Engineering and Natural Sciences; students register in the College of Engineering.

Information on the engineering/biology dual degree program is given on page 137.

COURSES

SEMESTER
 HOURS


Basic Sequence Courses
  Chemical Engineering 210, 317, Chemistry 302, 204, 618A, 118K,  
  Mathematics 408C, 408D, 427K,  

[Mechanical Engineering 210,] Physics 303K, 303L, 103M, 103N, Rhetoric and Composition 306
37

Major Sequence Courses

Chemical Engineering 322, 333T, [448,] 348, 350, 353, [353M,] 253K, 253M, 354, 360, 363, 264, 372, 473K
37
Approved area electives in chemical engineering
6

Other Required Courses

  Chemistry 618B, 118L, 353, 153K, Electrical Engineering 331 or 331K, 2
  Engineering Mechanics 314 or 306, English 316K
17



1922


  Chemistry elective chosen from Chemistry 431, 354 and 154K,  
  354L and 154K, 455
4
  Approved advanced mathematics, physics, chemistry, or biology elective
3
  American government, including Texas government
6
  American history
6
  Approved fine arts or humanities elective
3
  Approved social science elective
3
  Approved area electives
6
    MINIMUM REQUIRED
128

2. A student who chooses electrical engineering courses from technical area option I or III as area electives is advised to take Electrical Engineering 331K.

Rationale: The option was proposed to and accepted by the Degrees and Courses Committee by a group of faculty that taught biomedical engineering courses. The purpose of the option is to combine the fields of electrical engineering and biology more tightly so that students with an inclination toward biomedical engineering and especially the interface of electronics and medicine can gain a broader and more rigorous background by taking the two degrees simultaneously.

On pages 157 through 160 of The Undergraduate Catalog, 2000-2002, in the section DEGREES, make the following changes:

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

{No change to introductory text.}

CURRICULA

[Course requirements are divided into three categories: basic sequence courses, major sequence courses, and other required courses. Enrollment in major sequence courses is restricted to students who have received credit for all of the basic sequence courses and have been admitted to the major sequence by the College of Engineering Admissions Committee. (Requirements for admission to a major sequence are given on pages 130-131.) Enrollment in other required courses is not restricted by completion of the basic sequence.

[Courses used to fulfill technical and nontechnical elective requirements must be approved by the electrical engineering faculty before the student enrolls in them. Courses that fulfill the social science and fine arts/humanities requirements are listed on pages 139-140.]

Course requirements are divided into three categories: basic sequence courses, major sequence courses, and other required courses. Enrollment in major sequence courses is restricted to students who have passed the basic sequence courses with acceptable performance. Enrollment in other required courses is not restricted by completion of the basic sequence.

Courses used to fulfill technical area, technical elective, and other elective requirements must be approved by the electrical and computer engineering faculty before the student enrolls in them. Courses that fulfill the social science and fine arts/humanities requirements are listed on pages 139-140.


1923


Rationale: The proposed catalog changes represent a significant reform of both curricula. These changes are the first attempt to overhaul the ECE curriculums in more than 20 years. By the late 1970s, electrical engineering was still closely tied to physics, and was primarily concerned with the design and test of analog circuits, which involved semiconductor devices, radio frequency circuits, and power electronics. That has changed radically over the last 20 years with the widespread use o PCs and dial-up modems starting in the early 1980s, audio CD players in the late 1980s, digital cell phones in the early 1990s, and DVD and MP3 players, and cable and ADSL modems in the late 1990s. The consumer products over the last 20 years have been a mixture of analog and digital, with the amount of digital subsystems increasing over time to the point that these products are now more digital than analog. A similar phenomenon has occurred in military electronic equipment. As a consequence, the ECE field in the late 1990s was far less tied to physics and far more tied to digital computing than it was in the late 1970s.

Despite the rapid progress in industry, the 60 ECE credit hours in the 2000-2002 EE curriculum were 50% analog, 20% digital, and 18% student's choice. (The 66 ECE hours of the computer engineering curriculum in 2000-2002 were 41% analog, 32% digital, and 17% student's choice.) The 70 ECE credit hours in the 2002-2004 ECE curricula are 33% analog, 25% digital, and 28% student's choice. The 2002-2004 ECE curriculums give students more freedom in that they can pursue two areas of specialization instead of just one. The 2002-2004 ECE curriculums are also better matched to the motivations of students to study ECE and better tuned to the state of industry and graduate research in ECE.

These content and structural changes are a result of two years of discussions involving students, staff, and faculty in the Department of ECE, as chronicled on the ECE reform Web site at http://www.ece.utexas.edu/~bevans/eereform/index.html

The structural changes in the programs are summarized below:

  • ECE course abstracts: 60 out of 90 have been changed
  • Number of ECE specialization areas expanded from 9 to 15
  • Number of ECE specialization electives increased from 5-6 to 8
  • Access to ECE specialization courses moved from first semester senior year to first semester junior year
  • Longest pre-requisite chain to graduation shortened from 6 courses to 5 courses
  • Total number of hours reduced from 128 to 123

One impact of these structural changes is that a student entering UT from high school (without AP credits) can realistically finish in eight long semesters. In addition, a student transferring four semesters of coursework could realistically finish in four long semesters plus one summer semester. About 20% of the new students each year in ECE are transfer students.

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING/BIOLOGY DUAL DEGREE PROGRAM

A limited number of very strongly motivated students whose high school class standing and admission test scores indicate strong academic potential are admitted into the dual degree program in biology and electrical engineering. Graduates earn both the Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering and the Bachelor of Science in Biology. The program is offered jointly by the Colleges of Engineering and Natural Sciences; students register in the College of Engineering.

Information about the engineering/biology dual degree programs is given on page 137.

Rationale: The option was proposed to and accepted by the College¡s Degrees and Courses Committee by a group of faculty that taught biomedical engineering courses. The purpose of the option is to combine the fields of electrical engineering and biology more tightly so that students with an inclination toward biomedical engineering and especially the interface of electronics and medicine can gain a broader and more rigorous background by taking the two degrees simultaneously.


1924



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM

COURSES

SEMESTER
 HOURS


Basic Sequence Courses  
  [Chemistry 301,] Electrical Engineering 302, 306, 411, 312, 313, 316, 319K, 322C,
  English 316K, Mathematics 408C, 408D, 427K, 340L,
 
  Physics 303K, 303L, 103M, 103N, Rhetoric and Composition 306
[51] 54
Major Sequence Courses  
  [Electrical Engineering 321, 321K or 345M or 345S, 325, 333T, 338, 338K, 339,
  351K, 155, 362K, 464K, Physics 355, approved technical electives (15 hours)]
  Electrical Engineering 325, 333T, 438, 339, 351K, 155, 362K, 464C or 464H or 464K, 366
  Approved technical area courses
  Approved technical elective
 
 
27
18 or 19
3
Other Required Courses  
  American government, including Texas government
  American history
  Approved fine arts or humanities elective
  Approved social science elective
  [Engineering science elective
  Approved elective[s
6
6
3
3
3]
6] 3
  MINIMUM REQUIRED
[128] 123 or 124


Rationale:
The courses being deleted are no longer being offered. The Chemistry requirement would be deleted from the list since CH 301 will no longer be a required course in CHE and ECE.


COMPUTER ENGINEERING CURRICULUM

COURSES

SEMESTER
 HOURS


  [Chemistry 301,] Electrical Engineering 302, 306, 411, 312, 313, 316, 319K,
  322C, English 316K, Mathematics 408C, 408D, 325K, 427K,
  [Mathematics 325K or Philosophy 313K,] Physics 303K, 303L, 103M, 103N,
  Rhetoric and Composition 306
[51] 54
Major Sequence Courses
  [Electrical Engineering 321, 321K or 345M or 345S, 325, 333T, 338, 338K,
  339, 351K, 155, 360C, 360N, 464K, Electrical Engineering 360P or
  Computer Sciences 372, Physics 355, approved technical electives (12 hours)]
  Electrical Engineering 313, 325, 333T, 438, 339, 345L, 351K, 464C or 464H or 464K, 366
  Approved technical area courses
  Approved technical elective
 
26
18
3
Other Required Courses  
  American government, including Texas government
  American history
  Approved fine arts or humanities elective
  Approved social science elective
  [Engineering science elective
  Approved elective
  MINIMUM REQUIRED
 
6
6
3
3
3]
3
[128] 122



1925


Rationale: The courses being deleted are no longer being offered. The Chemistry requirement would be deleted from the list since CH 301 will no longer be a required course in CHE and ECE.


TECHNICAL AREA OPTIONS


[Students must select at least three courses from a technical area. Students who intend to satisfy the additional requirements of the accredited computer engineering program must select courses from the computer engineering technical area.]

Both electrical engineering and computer engineering students must choose two technical areas from the following list. Electrical engineering students must choose one electrical engineering technical area; the second

area may be in either electrical or computer engineering. Computer engineering students must choose one computer engineering technical area; the second area may be in either computer or electrical engineering.

Electrical Engineering Technical Areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Communications and Networking
  • Electromagnetic Engineering
  • Electronics
  • Electronic Materials and Devices
  • Management and Production
  • Power Systems and Energy Conversion
  • Premedical
  • Robotics and Controls
  • Signal and Image Processing

Computer Engineering Technical Areas

  • Computer Design
  • Embedded Systems
  • Software Development
  • System Software
  • VLSI Design

For all technical areas except premedical, the student must complete at least three courses in the area on the letter-grade basis. Because it includes nonengineering courses expected of medical school applicants, the premedical technical area requires completion of thirty-one hours of coursework; all courses must be completed on the letter-grade basis. A course may not be counted toward more than one technical area.

Electrical engineering students may count toward the technical area requirement one of the following advanced laboratory courses: Electrical Engineering 321, 321K, 440, 345L, 345S, 374L.

AREA [I] 1, BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING

[There are two distinct paths that students may take in the biomedical engineering technical area. One option is designed for premedical, preveterinary, and predental students; it contains many of the chemistry and life science


1926


courses required for admission to medical school. The other option, for students interested in the application of engineering to medicine, is designed to serve as a foundation for graduate study in biomedical engineering.

[Premedical, preveterinary, and predental option. Students pursuing this option should have a grade point average of at least 3.00 at the end of the sophomore year. To fulfill the technical area requirements of this option, a student should complete Electrical Engineering 374K and 374L. In addition, twelve semester hours of biology and sixteen semester hours of chemistry, including all of the following, are generally required for medical school application.

[Biology 211, Introductory Biology: Cell Biology
[Biology 212, Introductory Biology: Genetics and Evolution
[Biology 213, Introductory Biology: Diversity and Ecology
[Biology 214, Introductory Biology: Structure and Function of Organisms
[Chemistry 302, Principles of Chemistry II
[Chemistry 204, Introduction to Chemical Practice
[Chemistry 610A, Organic Chemistry; 610B, Organic Chemistry; and 210C, Organic Chemistry Laboratory
[A sample four-year program is available that illustrates how electives and additional courses can be used to fulfill all of the premedical requirements.

[Biomedical engineering option

[One of the following:

  [Electrical Engineering 325K, Antennas and Wireless Propagation
  [Electrical Engineering 345L, Microprocessor Applications and Organization
  [Electrical Engineering 347, Modern Optics
  [Electrical Engineering 351M, Digital Signal Processing
  [Mechanical Engineering 354, Biomedical Engineering
[Electrical Engineering 363N, Engineering Acoustics
[Electrical Engineering 374K, Biomedical Electronics
[Electrical Engineering 374L, Applications of Biomedical Engineering]

This technical area is designed for students interested in the application of engineering to medicine; it may serve as a foundation for graduate study in biomedical engineering.

Students must complete the following two courses.

Electrical Engineering 374K, Biomedical Electronics
Electrical Engineering 374L, Applications of Biomedical Engineering

They must also complete at least one course from the following list.

Electrical Engineering 325K, Antennas and Wireless Propagation
Electrical Engineering 345L, Microprocessor Applications and Organization *
Electrical Engineering 347, Modern Optics
Electrical Engineering 351M, Digital Signal Processing
Mechanical Engineering 354, Biomedical Engineering

A related technical area is premedical, described on page 160.


1927


[AREA II, COMPUTER ENGINEERING

[The student must take three courses from the following list, including at least one course from group 1 and at least one course from group 2.

[Group 1

[Electrical Engineering 332, Computer Graphics
[Electrical Engineering 345L, Microprocessor Applications and Organization
[Electrical Engineering 345S, Real-Time Digital Signal Processing Laboratory 6
[Electrical Engineering 360P, Operating Systems
[An advanced course that emphasizes programming

[ Group 2

[ Electrical Engineering 345M, Microcomputer Interfacing Laboratory 6
[ Electrical Engineering 360M, Digital Systems Engineering II
[ Electrical Engineering 360R, Computer-Aided Integrated Circuit Design
[ Electrical Engineering 360S, Digital Integrated Circuit Design
[ Electrical Engineering 362K, Introduction to Automatic Control
[ Electrical Engineering 379K, Topic 14: Telecommunication Networks ]

AREA 2, COMMUNICATIONS AND NETWORKING

Electrical Engineering 345S, Real-Time Digital Signal Processing Laboratory
Electrical Engineering 360K, Introduction to Digital Communications
Electrical Engineering 371M, Communication Systems
Electrical Engineering 372N, Telecommunication Networks
Electrical Engineering 379K, Topic 18: Network Security
Electrical Engineering 379K, Topic 19: Network Engineering Laboratory
Electrical Engineering 379K, Topic 21: Information and Cryptography
Mechanical Engineering 366L, Operations Research Models


[AREA III, INFORMATION SYSTEMS ENGINEERING

[Electrical Engineering 370, Automatic Control II
[Electrical Engineering 370K, Computer Control Systems
[Electrical Engineering 370L, Introduction to Manufacturing Systems Automation
[Electrical Engineering 371M, Communication Systems
[Electrical Engineering 379K, Topic 16: Introduction to Robotics and Mechatronics
[Electrical Engineering 379K, Topic: Introduction to Neural Networks
[Mathematics 365C, Real Analysis I]

AREA 3, COMPUTER DESIGN

Students must complete the following two courses.


1928


Electrical Engineering 345M, Embedded and Real-Time Systems Laboratory
Electrical Engineering 360N, Computer Architecture

They must also complete at least one course from the following list.

Computer Sciences 375, Compilers
Electrical Engineering 345L, Microprocessor Applications and Organization *
Electrical Engineering 360M, Digital Systems Design Using VHDL
Electrical Engineering 360G, Compilers

AREA [IV] 4, ELECTROMAGNETIC ENGINEERING

Electrical Engineering 321K, Mixed Signal and Circuits Laboratory
Electrical Engineering 325K, Antennas and Wireless Propagation
Electrical Engineering 347, Modern Optics
Electrical Engineering 348, Laser and Optical Engineering
Electrical Engineering 363M, Microwave and Radio Frequency Engineering
Electrical Engineering 363N, Engineering Acoustics
Electrical Engneering 379K,Topic: Radio Frequency Circuit Design
Physics 355, Modern Physics for Engineers


[AREA V, ELECTRONIC MATERIALS, ELECTRONIC DEVICES, AND INTEGRATED ELECTRONICS

[Electrical Engineering 325K, Antennas and Wireless Propagation
[Electrical Engineering 338L, Analog Integrated Circuit Design
[Electrical Engineering 440, Microelectronics Fabrication Techniques
[Electrical Engineering 347, Modern Optics
[Electrical Engineering 348, Laser and Optical Engineering
[Electrical Engineering 360R, Computer-Aided Integrated Circuit Design
[Electrical Engineering 360S, Digital Integrated Circuit Design]

AREA 5, ELECTRONICS

Electrical Engineering 321, Electronics Laboratory
Electrical Engineering 321K, Mixed Signal and Circuits Laboratory
Electrical Engineering 338K, Electronic Circuits II
Electrical Engineering 338L, Analog Integrated Circuit Design
Electrical Engineering 362L, Power Electronics
Electrical Engineering 374K, Biomedical Electronics
Electrical Engneering 379K,Topic: Radio
Frequency Circuit Design
Mathematics 346, Applied Linear Algebra

[AREA VI, MANAGEMENT AND PRODUCTION

[Electrical Engineering 366, Engineering Economics I
[Electrical Engineering 366K, Engineering Economics II
[Electrical Engineering 366L, Statistics for Manufacturing
[Electrical Engineering 370L, Introduction to Manufacturing Systems Automation
[Mechanical Engineering 366L, Operations Research Models]


1929


AREA 6, ELECTRONIC MATERIALS AND DEVICES

Students must complete the following course.

Electrical Engineering 440, Microelectronics Fabrication Techniques

They must also complete at least two courses from the following list.

Electrical Engineering 334K, Theory of Engineering Materials
Electrical Engineering 347, Modern Optics
Electrical Engineering 348, Laser and Optical Engineering
Physics 355, Modern Physics for Engineers

[AREA VII, POWER SYSTEMS AND ENERGY CONVERSION

[Students must complete Electrical Engineering 369, Power Systems Engineering, and at least two courses from the following list:

[Electrical Engineering 341, Electromechanical Systems I
[Electrical Engineering 362L, Power Electronics
[Electrical Engineering 368, Electrical Power Transmission and Distribution
[Electrical Engineering 379K, Topic: Electricity Markets, Trading, and Transmission]

AREA 7, EMBEDDED SYSTEMS

Students must complete three of the following courses, including at least one course in group 1 and one course in group 2.

Electrical Engineering 360N, Computer Architecture


Group 1: Embedded Hardware

E lectrical Engineering 360M, Digital Systems Design Using VHDL
Electrical Engineering 360R, Computer-Aided Integrated Circuit Design

Group 2: Embedded Software

Electrical Engineering 345L, Microprocessor Applications and Organization*
Electrical Engineering 345M, Embedded and Real-Time Systems Laboratory
Electrical Engineering 345S, Real-Time Digital Signal Processing Laboratory
Electrical Engineering 360P, Concurrent and Distributed Systems


[AREA VIII, SOFTWARE ENGINEERING

[Students must complete Electrical Engineering 360C, Data Structures in C++, and at least three courses from the following list. The student should take Electrical Engineering 360C during his or her first semester in the major sequence.

[Computer Sciences 345, Programming Languages


1930


[Computer Sciences 347, Data Management
[Electrical Engineering 360E, Computing Fundamentals
[Electrical Engineering 360F, Software Engineering Processes
[Electrical Engineering 360P, Operating Systems]

AREA 8, MANAGEMENT AND PRODUCTION

Electrical Engineering 366K, Engineering Economics II
Electrical Engineering 366L, Statistics for Manufacturing
Electrical Engineering 367L, Topic 5: Engineering Entrepreneurship
Electrical Engineering 367L, Topic: Total Quality Management
Electrical Engineering 370L, Introduction to Manufacturing Systems Automation
Electrical Engineering 379K, Topic 20: Computer Architecture: Personal Computer Design
Electrical Engineering 379K, Topic 22: System Design Metrics
Mechanical Engineering 366L, Operations Research Models

[AREA IX, TELECOMMUNICATIONS AND SIGNAL PROCESSING

[Students must complete three courses from the following list, including at least one course from each group.

[Group 1

[Electrical Engineering 345S, Real-Time Digital Signal Processing Laboratory 6
[Electrical Engineering 351M, Digital Signal Processing
[Electrical Engineering 371R, Digital Image and Video Processing

[Group 2

[Electrical Engineering 360K, Introduction to Digital Communications
[Electrical Engineering 371M, Communications Systems
[Electrical Engineering 379K, Topic 14: Telecommunication Networks
[Electrical Engineering 379K, Topic 18: Distributed Information System Security
[Electrical Engineering 379K, Topic 19: Network Engineering]

AREA 9, POWER SYSTEMS AND ENERGY CONVERSION

Electrical Engineering 341, Electric Drives and Machines
Electrical Engineering 362L, Power Electronics
Electrical Engineering 368, Electrical Power Transmission and Distribution
Electrical Engineering 369, Power Systems Engineering
Electrical Engineering 379K, Topic: Power Quality Harmonics
Mechanical Engineering 337C, Introduction to Nuclear Power Systems
Mechanical Engineering 374S, Solar Energy Systems Design


AREA 10, PREMEDICAL

Students who plan to go on to medical, veterinary, or dental school must complete coursework in addition to that required for the BSEE in order to meet professional school admission requirements. For example, medical school applicants must have completed twelve semester hours of biological science and sixteen hours of chemistry. The premedical technical area, which incorporates some of these admission requirements, is designed


1931


for such students. Choosing biomedical engineering as the other technical area will also help the premedical, preveterinary, and predental student to complete the BSEE degree more quickly. A sample four-year program available from the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering illustrates how electives may be used to meet medical school admission requirements.

Students pursuing this option must have a grade point average of at least 3.00 at the end of the sophomore year.

Students must complete all of the following courses.

Biology 206L, Laboratory Experiments in Biology: Structure and Function of Organisms
Biology 211, Introductory Biology: Cell Biology
Biology 212, Introductory Biology: Genetics and Evolution
Biology 214, Introductory Biology: Structure and Function of Organisms
Biology 325, Genetics
Biology 365R, Vertebrate Physiology I
Chemistry 302, Principles of Chemistry II
Chemistry 204, Introduction to Chemical Practice
Chemistry 610, Organic Chemistry
Chemisty 210C, Organic Chemistry Laboratory
Electrical Engineering 374K, Biomedical Electronics
Electrical Engineering 374L, Applications of Biomedical Engineering

For medical school, a total of twelve semester hours of bilogocial science and sixteen semester hours of chemistry are required, including all of the above courses.

AREA 11, ROBOTICS AND CONTROLS

Electrical Engineering 345L, Microprocessor Applications and Organization *
Electrical Engineering 362K, Introduction to Automatic Control **
Electrical Engineering 370, Automatic Control II
Electrical Engineering 370K, Computer Control Systems
Electrical Engineering 370L, Introduction to Manufacturing Systems Automation
Electrical Engineering 370N, Introduction to Robotics and Mechatronics
Electrical Engineering 371D, Introduction to Neural Networks
Electrical Engineering 371R, Digital Image and Video Processing
Mathematics 365C, Real Analysis I

AREA 12, SIGNAL AND IMAGE PROCESSING

Electrical Engineering 345S, Real-Time Digital Signal Processing Laboratory
Electrical Engineering 351M, Digital Signal Processing
Electrical Engineering 371D, Introduction to Neural Networks
Electrical Engineering 371R, Digital Image and Video Processing
Mathematics 374, Fourier and Laplace Transforms

AREA 13, SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT

Students must complete the following course.

Electrical Engineering 360F, Software Engineering Processes


1932


They must also complete at least two courses from the following list.

Electrical Engineering 360C, Algorithms
Electrical Engineering 360P, Concurrent and Distributed Systems
Computer Sciences 345, Programming Languages
Computer Sciences 373, Software Engineering

AREA 14, SYSTEM SOFTWARE

Computer Sciences 347, Data management
Computer Sciences 375, Compilers
Electrical Engineering 332, Computer Graphics
Electrical Engineering 345L, Microprocessor Applications and Organization*
Electrical Engineering 345M, Embedded and Real-Time Systems Laboratory
Electrical Engineering 360D, Data Management
Electrical Engineering 360G, Compilers
Electrical Engineering 360P, Concurrent and Distributed Systems
Electrical Engineering 372N, Telecommunication Networks
Mathematics 373K, Algebraic Structures I

AREA 15, VLSI DESIGN

Students must complete the following two courses.

Electrical Engineering 360R, Computer-Aided Integrated Circuit Design
Electrical Engineering 360S, Digital Integrated Circuit Design

They must also complete at least one course from the following list.

Electrical Engineering 338L, Analog Integrated Circuit Design
Electrical Engineering 440, Microelectronics Fabrication Techniques


footnotes:
[6. Electrical Engineering 321K may not be counted both toward the major and as a technical area course.]
*. Electrical Engineering 345L may not be counted as a technical area elective by students following the computer engineering curriculum.
**. Electrical Engineering 362K may not be counted as a technical area elective by students following the electrical engineering curriculum.

On pages 166 through 169 of The Undergraduate Catalog, 2000-2002, in the section DEGREES, make the following changes:

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

{No change to first eleven paragraphs.}

PROJECT-CENTERED EDUCATION (PROCEED)

During 2002-2003 and 2003-2004, the Department of Mechanical Engineering is pilot testing a major curriculum development effort entitled PROCEED (Project-Centered Education). Selected sections in a number of courses throughout the curriculum will be taught from a project-centered perspective, in which students


1933


working in teams immediately apply the theory being covered in class to current industrial problems. Projects may range from laboratory evaluation over a semester of a piece of industrial hardware to development of a series of computer models, each in two or three weeks. PROCEED also includes integrated laboratory course/lecture course combinations. In most cases, students may take either the PROCEED version of a course or a conventionally-taught section.

PROCEED sections are identified in the Course Schedule.

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS

Mechanical engineering students may develop added breadth in their education either through the Business Foundations Program or through the Elements of Computing Program[, a program in computer sciences for non-computer sciences majors].

Business Foundations Program. Students who would like to learn more about fundamental business concepts and practices may take [the] supplemental coursework that leads to a Business Foundations Certificate, awarded by the Red McCombs School of Business. The Business Foundations Program is described on pages 43-44; for more information, contact the program office or the Department of Mechanical Engineering undergraduate office.

Elements of Computing. Students who would like to learn more about computer sciences may take the coursework that leads to a certificate in the elements of computing, awarded by the Department of Computer Sciences. The Elements of Computing Program is described on page 397; for more information, contact the [Department of Mechanical Engineering undergraduate office or the] Department of Computer Sciences or the Department of Mechanical Engineering undergraduate office.

CURRICULUM

Course requirements are divided into three categories: basic sequence courses, major sequence courses, and other required courses. Enrollment in major sequence courses is restricted to students who have received credit for all of the basic sequence courses and have been admitted to the major sequence by the College of Engineering Admissions Committee. (Requirements for admission to a major sequence are given on pages 130-131.) Enrollment in other required courses is not restricted by completion of the basic sequence. Courses used to fulfill technical and nontechnical elective requirements must be approved by the mechanical engineering faculty before the student enrolls in them. Courses that fulfill the social science and fine arts/humanities requirements are listed on pages 139-140.

COURSES

SEMESTER
 HOURS


Basic Sequence Courses  
  Chemistry 301, Engineering Mechanics 306,
  Mathematics 408C, 408D, 427K, Mechanical Engineering 302, 205, 311,
  324, 326, Physics 303K, 303L, 103M, 103N, Rhetoric and Composition 306
43
Major Sequence Courses  
  Mechanical Engineering 333T, 335, 336, 136L, 338, 339, 242L (or 130L and 139L), 1 343, 344,
  244L, 353, 366J, [466K] 266K, 266P
  Approved technical area electives
 
36
10
Other Required Courses

 

1 Correction submitted by the College of Engineering and approved by John Durbin, Secretary, on behalf of the Faculty Council on May 2, 2002.


1934


  Electrical Engineering 331K, Engineering Mechanics 319, English 316K,
  Mechanical Engineering 111L, 218, 330
  American government, including Texas government
  American history
  Approved fine arts or humanities elective
  Approved mathematics elective
  Approved natural science/mathematics elective
  Approved social science elective
15
6
6
3
3
3
3
  MINIMUM REQUIRED
128

TECHNICAL AREA OPTIONS

Each student must choose one of the technical area options described below. Those who wish to develop some specialization within mechanical engineering should choose the option from areas I through VI; those who wish to obtain a broader background should choose area VII, general mechanical engineering.

AREA [I] 1, [BIOMEDICAL] BIOMECHANICAL ENGINEERING

There are many areas of biotechnology in which mechanical engineers play an important role. These include biomaterials, biomechanics, fluid flow, heat transfer, mechanical design, nuclear science, and systems analysis. This option also can be tailored to provide a background for professional education in medicine or dentistry or for advanced study in biomedical engineering. Mechanical Engineering 354 and 354M are required in this option.

Mechanical Engineering 337D, Radiation and Radiation Protection
Mechanical Engineering 354, Biomedical Engineering
Mechanical Engineering 354M, Biomechanics of Human Movement
Mechanical Engineering 177K, Projects in Mechanical Engineering
Mechanical Engineering 179M, 279M, or 379M, Topics in Mechanical Engineering

  (approved topics related to [biomedical] biomechanical engineering). More than one topic may be counted as an area elective.
Mechanical Engineering 379N, Engineering Acoustics
Approved biomedical engineering elective, approved natural science elective, or
  Mechanical Engineering 325L, Cooperative Engineering (a maximum of one course)

{No substantive changes to Areas II and III. Roman numerals will be changed to Arabic.}

AREA [IV] 4, NUCLEAR AND RADIATION ENGINEERING

Engineers with a background in nuclear and radiation engineering find opportunities providing electrical power in safe, efficient, and environmentally benign ways for commercial or defense purposes; extending nuclear reactor plant life, in materials analysis; developing new ways of producing and using radioisotopes in medical physics for organ imaging or cancer therapy; developing new industrial applications for neutron or gamma-ray radiation use; and developing long-term strategies for radioactive waste disposal.

Students may take either of the following options.

Option 1: Nuclear Engineering

Mechanical Engineering 136N or 236N, Concepts in Nuclear and Radiation Engineering
Mechanical Engineering 337C, Introduction to Nuclear Power Systems


1935


Mechanical Engineering 361E, Nuclear Reactor Engineering
Mechanical Engineering 361G, Nuclear Reactor Operations and Control
Mechanical Engineering 177K, Projects in Mechanical Engineering (topics in nuclear and

  radiation engineering)
Mechanical Engineering 179M, 279M, or 379M, Topics in Mechanical Engineering (approved topics
  related to nuclear and radiation engineering). More than one topic may be counted as an area elective.
Option 2: Radiation Engineering

Mechanical Engineering 136N or 236N, Concepts in Nuclear and Radiation Engineering
Mechanical Engineering 337D, Radiation and Radiation Protection
Mechanical Engineering 337E, Radioactive Waste Management
Mechanical Engineering 361F, Radiation and Radiation Protection Laboratory
Mechanical Engineering 177K, Projects in Mechanical Engineering (topics in nuclear and
radiation engineering)
Mechanical Engineering 179M, 279M, or 379M, Topics in Mechanical Engineering (approved topics related
  to nuclear and radiation engineering). More than one topic may be counted as an area elective.

{No further changes.}

Rationale: The Department of Mechanical Engineering at UT Austin is undertaking a major reform of the undergraduate curriculum under the title PROCEED (Project-Centered Education). The rationale for this reform effort is based on a large body of educational research which indicates that students develop a more thorough understanding of complex material and exhibit better retention of the material when it is taught and learned in the context of a concrete problem to which theory can be immediately applied. The "project" may range from a small lab experiment whose results are used as part of a homework problem to a major semester-long design/prototype/test experience. Many projects will be carried out in teams of 2-4 students and will require more professional-style reporting than traditional homework activities. The PROCEED curriculum will thus result in a more hands-on, team-oriented, communicative learning environment.

Other features of the PROCEED effort include collaboration of practicing engineers with UTME faculty in formulating meaningful projects and in mentoring students via video-teleconferencing, reequipping instructional labs to provide a more flexible experimental environment, and developing integrated senior-year elective options that will better prepare students to enter professional practice or graduate study. We believe that Project-Centered Education will provide our graduates with a more exciting undergraduate experience and a sounder basis on which to launch their subsequent careers.

On page 172 of The Undergraduate Catalog, 2000-2002, in the section DEGREES, make the following changes:

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PETROLEUM ENGINEERING

{No change to introductory text.}


CURRICULUM

Course requirements are divided into three categories: basic sequence courses, major sequence courses, and other required courses. Enrollment in major sequence courses is restricted to students who have received credit for all of the basic sequence courses and have been admitted to the major sequence by the College of Engineering Admissions Committee. (Requirements for admission to a major sequence are given on pages 130-131.) Enrollment in other required courses is not restricted by completion of the basic sequence.


1936


Courses used to fulfill technical and nontechnical elective requirements must be approved by the petroleum and geosystems engineering undergraduate adviser before the student enrolls in them. Courses that fulfill the social science and fine arts/humanities requirements are listed on pages 139-140.

COURSES

SEMESTER
 HOURS


Basic Sequence Courses  
  Chemistry 301, 302, Engineering Mechanics 306,
  Geological Sciences 312K, 416M, Mathematics 408C, 408D, 427K,
  Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 102, 310, 312, 333T,
  Physics 303K, 303L, 103M, 103N, Rhetoric and Composition 306
49
Major Sequence Courses  
  Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 421K, 322K, 323, 424, 326,
  430, 331, 362, 365, 368, 373K, 373L
  Approved technical area electives
39
[6] 3
Other Required Courses  
  English 316K
  Engineering Mechanics [311,] 319
  Required technical area courses
  American government, including Texas government
  American history
  Approved fine arts or humanities elective
  Approved social science elective
3
[6] 3
9 or 10
6
6
3
3
  MINIMUM REQUIRED
[130 or 131] 124 or 125


Rationale: The Department of Petroleum Engineering is reducing the total semester hours from 130-131 to 127-128 with the deletion of EM 311. This course is no longer a requirement.