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DOCUMENTS OF THE GENERAL FACULTY

CHANGES IN THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING CHAPTER OF THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 2000-2002 — Part Two

Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Neal E. Armstrong of the College of Engineering filed with the secretary of the Faculty Council the following proposed changes to the College of Engineering chapter of The Undergraduate Catalog, 2000-2002. These changes, with the exception of section four, were approved by a no-protest vote by the College of Engineering faculty on Monday, December 10, 2001. The faculty approved the addition of the engineering/biology dual degree program on September 21, 2001. The secretary has classified this proposal as legislation of exclusive application and primary interest to a single college or school.

The initial edited proposal was received from the Office of Official Publications on January 17, 2002, and was sent to the Committee on Undergraduate Degree Program Review from the Office of the General Faculty on January 28, 2002. The committee postponed consideration of the changes pending receipt of rationale. A corrected version of the legislation was received from Official Publications on March 7, 2002, and was sent to the committee on March 20, 2002. The committee forwarded the proposed changes to the Office of the General Faculty on March 25, 2002, recommending approval. The authority to grant final approval on behalf of the General Faculty resides with the Faculty Council.

If no objection is filed with the Office of the General Faculty by the date specified below, the legislation will be held to have been approved by the Faculty Council. If objection is filed within the prescribed period, the legislation will be presented to the Faculty Council at its next meeting. The objection, with reasons, must be signed by a member of the Faculty Council.

To be counted, a protest must be received in the Office of the General Faculty by April 10, 2002.


<signed>


John R. Durbin, Secretary
The Faculty Council


This legislation was posted on the Faculty Council web site on April 3, 2002. Paper copies are available on request from the Office of the General Faculty, FAC 22, F9500.


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CHANGES IN THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING CHAPTER OF THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 2000-2002 — Part Two

The changes set forth below are proposed for the College of Engineering in The Undergraduate Catalog, 2000-2002, of The University of Texas at Austin.

On page 132 of The Undergraduate Catalog, 2000-2002, in the section ADMISSION AND REGISTRATION, make the following changes:

TRANSFER TO AN ENGINEERING MAJOR

A student may transfer to the College of Engineering from another division of the University in accordance with the regulations given in General Information.

[A University student who wants to transfer to a major in the College of Engineering must submit an application to that major; this is true both for students in other colleges of the University and for students in other engineering majors. Applications must be submitted by March 1 for admission in the summer or fall and by October 1 for admission in the spring. Admission to all engineering majors is offered as space is available to the students who are academically best qualified.]

A University student, either an engineering major or a nonmajor, who wants to transfer to a major in the College of Engineering must

1. Have completed at least twenty-four semester hours of coursework in residence in the University,
2. Submit an application for admission to the major. The application form is available at http://www.engr.utexas.edu/students/stay/major_changes.cfm.
3. Submit the application by March 1 for admission in the summer or fall or by October 1 for admission in the spring.

Admission to all engineering majors is offered to the students who are best qualified as space is available.

If a student who has been admitted to a major sequence is granted admission to another major, he or she must complete all the requirements of the basic sequence of the new major and must apply for admission to the new major sequence on the basis of the curriculum in effect at the time of application.

[A student who is admitted to the University but denied admission to an engineering major may seek admission to another major. He or she may not then apply to transfer to the original major for at least one calendar year.]

Rationale: The only change is to require the completion of at least 24 SCH in residence. The rationale is that it gives us two semesters of grades to evaluate and minimizes the number of students who enroll in one major with the intention of changing to another immediately.

On page 134 of The Undergraduate Catalog, 2000-2002, in the section ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES make the following changes:

ENGINEERING HONORS PROGRAM

[Beyond the freshman year, a limited number of engineering students who have demonstrated exceptional academic ability will be invited to participate in the Engineering Honors Program. Students are selected by the Engineering Honors Program Committee. Admission to the program includes an invitation and submission of an application that includes a statement of purpose.

[To be eligible, a student must be in the top 10 percent of those in his or her classification and degree plan and must meet other criteria established by the Engineering Honors Program Committee. Transfer students are


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eligible after they have completed at the University twenty-four semester hours of coursework applicable to the degree.

[To continue in the program, a student must maintain the academic standards established by the Engineering Honors Program Committee.]

To be eligible for the Engineering Honors Program, a student must be enrolled in the College of Engineering, must have completed at least thirty semester hours of coursework, and must have completed at least twenty-four semester hours of coursework in residence. The student must also have a grade point average on coursework completed in residence that is in the top 10 percent of those in his or her classification and degree plan. The student may be required to meet other criteria established by the Engineering Honors Program Committee.

To continue in the program, the student must maintain the academic standards established by the Engineering Honors Program Committee.

Rationale: The College of Engineering¡s Engineering Honors Committee elected to base all Àhonors” considerations on the in residence GPA applicable to the degree. This agrees with the current catalog requirement for graduation with honors in the COE. The 24 SCH in residence gives us at least two semesters of grades which levels the field for those being invited to participate in the Engineering Honors Program.

On page 135 of The Undergraduate Catalog, 2000-2002, in the section ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES, make the following changes:

ENGINEERING SCHOLARS

Engineering Scholars are designated each spring semester from the sophomore, junior, and senior classes. To be eligible, a student must [have a certain number of hours of credit earned at the University, must rank in the top 5 percent of the class,] be enrolled in the College of Engineering, must have completed at least twenty-four semester hours of coursework in residence while enrolled in the college, must have a grade point average that places him or her in the top 5 percent of the class [must be of good character, and must show promise of continued success in engineering]. The grade point average used to determine the student's class rank includes only courses that the student has completed in residence and that are applicable to the degree.

Rationale: This change corresponds to the proposed changes for the Engineering Honors Program.

On page 137 of The Undergraduate Catalog, 2000-2002, in the section DEGREES, add the following before TECHNICAL AREA OPTIONS:

ENGINEERING/BIOLOGY DUAL DEGREE PROGRAMS

A limited number of very strongly motivated students whose high school class standing and admission test scores indicate strong academic potential are admitted into one of the dual degree programs in biology and engineering. Two programs are available: the Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering combined with the Bachelor of Science in Biology (cell and molecular biology option), and the Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering combined with the Bachelor of Science in Biology (neurobiology option). Each program, offered jointly by the College of Engineering and College of Natural Sciences, provides students with a rigorous education in both engineering and biology that is designed to prepare them for graduate study in either discipline. The goal of each program is to provide the student with equal skill in engineering and biology and with a full understanding of the different problem-solving strategies of the two. Students may complete both degrees in five years if they register for fifteen to eighteen hours of coursework each semester.

Additional information is available from the College of Engineering Office of Student Affairs.


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Rationale: The option was proposed to and accepted by the Degrees and Courses Committee by a group of faculty that taught biomedical engineering courses.

On pages 139 through 140 of The Undergraduate Catalog, 2000-2002, in the section DEGREES, make the following changes:

SOCIAL SCIENCE ELECTIVE

Each student must complete three semester hours of coursework in anthropology, economics, geography, linguistics, psychology, or sociology. The following courses may be used to fulfill this requirement. Additional courses may be approved by the student¡s undergraduate adviser; to be counted toward the requirement, the course must be approved before the student enrolls in it.

Anthropology 302, Cultural Anthropology
Anthropology 318L, Mexican American Culture
Anthropology 322M, Topics in Cultures of the World
Anthropology 324L, Topics in Anthropology
Anthropology 327C, Topics in American Cultures
Economics 304K, Introduction to Microeconomics
Economics 304L, Introduction to Macroeconomics
Geography 305, This Human World: An Introduction to Geography
Geography 315, The City: An Introduction to Urban Geography
[Geography 324, Cultural Geography of North America]
Geography 334, Conservation, Resources, and Technology
Geography 337, The Modern American City
Linguistics 306, Introduction to the Study of Language
[Linguistics 325, Introduction to the Study of African American English]
Psychology 301, Introduction to Psychology
Sociology 302, Introduction to the Study of Society
Sociology 309, Chicanos in American Society
[Sociology 313K, Introduction to the Study of Religion]
Sociology 333K, Sociology of Gender
Sociology 344, Racial and Ethnic Relations
[Sociology 346, The City and Urbanization
[Sociology 348K, Chicanos: Sociological Perspectives]

Rationale: The courses being deleted are no longer being offered.


FINE ARTS/HUMANITIES ELECTIVE

Each student must complete three semester hours of coursework in archaeology, architecture, art (excluding design and studio art), classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts, humanities, music (excluding instruments and ensemble), philosophy (excluding courses in logic), or theatre and dance. The following courses may be used to fulfill this requirement. Additional courses may be approved by the student¡s undergraduate adviser; to be counted toward the requirement, the course must be approved before the student enrolls in it.

Architecture 308, Architecture and Society
[Architecture 318K, History of Architecture, Survey I
[Architecture 348, The Appreciation of Architecture]
Architecture 368R, Topics in the History of Architecture
Art History 301, Introduction to the Visual Arts
Art History 302, Survey of Ancient through Medieval Art
Art History 303, Survey of Renaissance through Modern Art
Classical Civilization 301, Introduction to Ancient Greece
Classical Civilization 302, Introduction to Ancient Rome


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Classical Civilization 302K, Introduction to Archaeological Studies II: Classical Archaeology
Classical Civilization 303, Introduction to Classical Mythology
Classical Civilization 305, Topics in Roman Civilization
Classical Civilization 306M, Introduction to Medical and Scientific Terminology
[Classical Civilization 307K, Topics in Archaeology
[Humanities 320, Core Course in the Humanities]
Humanities 350, Topics in the Humanities
Music 302L, An Introduction to Western Music
Music 303M, Introduction to Traditional Musics in World Cultures
[Music 342, Area Studies in Ethnomusicology]
Philosophy 301, Introduction to Philosophy
Philosophy 304, Contemporary Moral Problems
Philosophy 305, Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion
Philosophy 310, Knowledge and Reality
Philosophy 318, Introduction to Ethics
Philosophy 325K, Ethical Theories
Philosophy 325L, Business, Ethics, and Public Policy
Philosophy 327, Contemporary Philosophy
Theatre and Dance 301, Introduction to Theatre
Theatre and Dance 317C, Theatre History through the Eighteenth Century
[Theatre and Dance 317D, Theatre History since the Eighteenth Century]

Rationale: The courses being deleted are no longer being offered.