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DOCUMENTS OF THE GENERAL FACULTY

Following are the minutes of the regular Faculty Council meeting of March 18, 2002.


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John R. Durbin, Secretary
The General Faculty


MINUTES OF THE REGULAR FACULTY COUNCIL MEETING OF

March 18, 2002

The sixth regular meeting of the Faculty Council for the academic year 2001-2002 was held in Room 212 of the Main Building on Monday, March 18, 2002, at 2:15 P.M.

ATTENDANCE.

Present: Mark I. Alpert, Anthony P. Ambler, Katherine M. Arens, Matthew J. Bailey, Glen S. Baum, Harold W. Billings, Douglas G. Biow, David G. Bogard, Joanna M. Brooks, Kathryn E. Brown, Cindy I. Carlson, Michael J. Churgin, Richard L. Cleary, Donald G. Davis, Patrick J. Davis, Lesley A. Dean-Jones, Thomas W. Dison, John D. Dollard, John R. Durbin, Sheldon Ekland-Olson, Larry R. Faulkner, Alan W. Friedman, Omer R. Galle, John C. (Jack) Gilbert, Nell H. Gottleib, Michael H. Granof, James L. Hill, Sharon D. Horner, Julie R. Irwin, Judith A. Jellison, Ward W. Keeler, Martin W. Kevorkian, Robert C. Koons, Stefan M. Kostka, William S. Livingston, Glenn Y. Masada, Melvin E. L. Oakes, Melissa L. Olive, Alba A. Ortiz, Thomas G. Palaima, Bruce P. Palka, Theodore E. Pfeifer, Esther L. Raizen, Linda E. Reichl, Elizabeth Richmond-Garza, Cynthia W. Shelmerdine, Mark R. V. Southern, Janet Staiger, Michael P. Starbird, Frances Elizabeth Valdez, James W. Vick.

Absent: Efraim P. Armendariz, Neal E. Armstrong (excused), Victor L. Arnold, Joyce L. Banks (excused), Brigitte L. Bauer (excused), Gerard H. B³hague (excused), Lynn E. Blais, Daniel A. Bonevac, Dean A. Bredeson (excused), Dana L. Cloud (excused), Patricia L. Clubb, Andrew P. Dillon, Edwin Dorn, John D. Downing, Minette E. Drumwright (excused), Robert Freeman, Dorie J. Gilbert, Lita A. Guerra (excused), Marvin L. Hackert, Donald A. Hale (excused),* Von Matthew (Matt) Hammond, Barbara J. Harlow (excused), Thomas M. Hatfield, Kevin P. Hegarty, Manuel J. Justiz (excused), Karrol A. Kitt (excused), David R. Kracman (excused), Richard W. Lariviere, David A. Laude (excused), Steven W. Leslie, David R. Maidment, Robert G. May, Francis L. Miksa, Patricia C. Ohlendorf (excused), David M. Parichy, Elmira Popova, William C. Powers, Mary Ann R. Rankin (excused), Johnnie D. Ray, Kevin Robnett, Victoria Rodriguez, David J. Saltman, Juan M. Sanchez, Dolores Sands, Salomon A. Stavchansky, Frederick R. Steiner, Ben G. Streetman, Teresa A. Sullivan (excused), Janice S. Todd, Jarrad Allen Toussant, Daniel A. Updegrove, Phyllis Boyd Waelder, N. Bruce Walker (excused), Ellen A. Wartella, Mary F. Wheeler, Barbara W. White, James R. Yates, Michael P. Young.



Voting Members:
41
present,
33
absent,
74
total.
Non-Voting Members:
10
present,
26
absent,
36
total.
Total Members:
51
present,
59
absent,
110
total.


*Correction made on April 22, 2002, to reflect excused absence.

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I.
REPORT OF THE SECRETARY.

There were no questions about the written report (D 1776-1779).

The secretary said that the School of Architecture had nominated no one for its position on the Faculty Council, even though he had warned all voting members of the faculty during the process that architecture and two other colleges had no nominees at that time. As a result, the College of Architecture will not have a Council representative for 2002-2004. Richard Cleary (architecture) said he had tried to encourage members of his college to nominate or agree to serve. He said one problem was that most members of the faculty in the college teach on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday afternoons.

The secretary also commented on the generally light participation in General Faculty elections. Alan Friedman (English) wondered if it would be better to return from electronic voting to the use of paper ballots distributed through the University mail system. The secretary said he would raise the issue of participation with the Faculty Council Executive Committee.

On remarks on proposed catalog changes, the secretary called attention to a change in calculus courses offered by the mathematics department, and urged those from academic units affected to give careful thought to the new possibilities for their students. M408C/D will remain unchanged, courses M403K/L are being dropped, and a new three-semester sequence, M408K/L/M, will be added. The content of M408K/L/M will be essentially the same as that of M408C/D, except the first semester will include precalculus material in which many students are deficient, and the overall pace will be more deliberate than that of M408C/D. For many disciplines, M408K/L, which covers the basic concepts of calculus, will be sufficient; other disciplines, such as those in engineering, may prefer to require M408L/M, expecting students to test out of M408K. The secretary said that, because the changes had been approved so late in the year, the Committee on Undergraduate Degree Program Review did not rush individual academic units to decide on what they would require at this time.

II.
APPROVAL OF MINUTES.

A. The minutes of the Faculty Council meeting of February 18, 2002, were approved by voice vote (1793-1798).

III.
COMMUNICATION WITH THE PRESIDENT.

A. Comments by the President.

To remind the faculty of the scope and importance of the University's work, President Faulkner read part of his introductory remarks from testimony to the legislature's Joint Interim Committee on Higher Education Funding on February 21.

In the remarks, he called attention to the number of degrees the University has awarded in the past five years, and said that few institutions in America have a comparable record of performance. He said we have elevated our freshman retention rate to 92% and our six-year graduation rate above 70%.

We are the No. 2 producer of doctoral degrees awarded to Hispanics in America; the No. 2 producer of minority doctoral degrees; and No. 4 in the nation in bachelor's degrees conferred on Hispanics.

During the past five years, 2,919 migrant students from around the nation have completed their high school requirements through the UT Migrant Student Program; more than 300,000 students have participated in UT's distance education programs, including 50,000 police officers trained from communities across Texas each year; 38,000 Texas managers have been trained at the UT Red McCombs School of Business„none of whom were full-time students. Another 3,500 managers have been trained from other states and countries during that period.

UT students have been awarded two Rhodes, three Marshall, and four Truman scholarships during the past five years. The faculty who made all that possible also attracted, over the past five years, $1.4 billion in research support„$1.1 billion from non-state sources, nearly all of that from outside Texas.


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  Scores of companies have been spun off from the University, including Tracor, Radian, National Instruments, and Evolutionary Technologies. In the past decade, the Austin Technology Incubator (at IC2) graduated 64 companies that generated 2,500 new jobs and more than $1 billion in revenue.

The president sketched the contributions to the state from UT's recruitment of Dr. Sharon Vaughn, a leading researcher in the field of reading, and Dr. Adron Harris, leader of the newly-established Waggoner Center for Alcoholism and Addiction Research. He also sketched UT's steps in the field of nanoscience.

He said: "This is all evidence that we may have begun to reach the bar set by our forebears, who defined in the Texas Constitution a particular responsibility for the state to establish and maintain a university of the first class."

However, he also said: "The single point that I want to make right now is that the top of American higher education is a tough, competitive business. Every day, Texas is sized up by agenda-setters everywhere, both inside and outside the state, to see whether we have the brainpower, the skill, the facilities, the organizations—the competitiveness—to meet the challenges of the day. Like any other competitive business, this one requires the right talent, continuous reexamination of resource commitments, and strategic reinvestment. It requires benchmarking on a national scale, and constant testing of program quality. We are all attuned to all of that at UT Austin. It is also what you should expect."

In other comments, the president noted that the University had reached its original goal of raising $1 billion in the We're Texas Campaign. He said that in a celebration of that achievement, on March 2, he had announced two initiatives. The first, the Knowledge Gateway Program, has a goal of providing every Texan with a tailorable portal on the Internet into the University's resources. The second will be the creation of a committee of 125 leading citizens of the state to make recommendations for the future of the University. This is tied to the 125th anniversary of the University's founding, and is a successor to the Committee of 75 and the Centennial Commission, which were created on the corresponding, earlier anniversaries.

 
B. Questions to the President.

There were none.

IV.
REPORT OF THE CHAIR.

Chair Bruce Palka (mathematics) reported on recent meetings of the Texas Council of Faculty Senates and The University of Texas System Faculty Advisory Council. He said there was concern about possible consequences of the state's "Closing the Gap" initiative, which has the aim of bringing 500,000 new students into higher education by 2015. He said the plan was being proposed without corresponding plans to increase capacity and the number of faculty in the state.

The chair also said the System Faculty Advisory Council had recommended to the UT System that assessment/accountability initiatives, planned for mathematics, writing, and other areas, not be extended beyond mathematics and writing until the success of those programs has been fully evaluated.

V.
REPORT OF THE CHAIR-ELECT.

Chair-elect Michael Granof (accounting) urged members to plan to attend the joint meeting with the Texas A&M Faculty Senate in College Station on March 25.

VI.
SPECIAL ORDERS — None.

VII.
PETITIONS — None.

VIII.
UNFINISHED BUSINESS— None.


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IX.
REPORTS OF THE GENERAL FACULTY, COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS, AND COMMITTEES — None.

X.
NEW BUSINESS.

A. Protest to Proposed Engineering/Biology Dual Degree Program in the College of Natural Sciences Chapter of The Undergraduate Catalog, 2000-2002 (D 1723-1724, D 1800).

The secretary had filed a protest to this proposal because the Committee on Undergraduate Degree Program Review had not recommended approval due to lack of sufficient knowledge about the details of the proposal. That committee was expecting more details about the proposal, from the College of Engineering. Therefore, the secretary moved that the item be tabled until the April 15 Council meeting. The motion to table was approved. [Based on later discussion in the Committee on Undergraduate Degree Program Review, the secretary withdrew the protest.]

B. Philip Doty (library and information science), chair of the committee, presented the report, which is reproduced in D 1780-1788. The final version of the report contains an addition, in D 1782, which was made by Professor Doty at the meeting. Harold Billings (director of general libraries) emphasized the important role played by the University's consortial relationship with other schools in the UT System. He also emphasized that the University's libraries are important not just to academic and research units on the campus, but in supporting information and research needs across the state. He thought this message should be stressed to the legislature and to others.

C. Report from the Faculty Welfare Committee, Benefit Program Survey 2001.

Elizabeth Richmond-Garza (English), chair of the committee, presented the report, which is reproduced on D 1789-1792. Professor Richmond-Garza said that mental health care had not been addressed by the survey, and she thought that would be a critical question to raise in the next survey on benefits. Other comments were made by Mark Alpert (marketing administration), whose students had helped carry out the survey.

D. Report from the Committee of Counsel on Academic Freedom and Responsibility.

This report was presented by Janet Staiger (radio-television-film), chair of the committee. A formal version appears in D 1811-1811a.

XI.
ANNOUNCEMENTS AND COMMENTS — None.

XII.
QUESTIONS TO THE CHAIR — None.

XIII.
ADJOURNMENT.

The meeting adjourned at 3:15 P.M.

Distributed through the Faculty Council web site on April 9, 2002. Copies are available on request from the Office of the General Faculty, FAC 22, F9500.