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DOCUMENTS OF THE GENERAL FACULTY

PROPOSED CHANGES IN THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND FAMILY SCIENCES IN THE COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES CHAPTER IN THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 2004-2006

On January 17, 2003, Dean Mary Ann Rankin of the College of Natural Sciences filed with the secretary of the Faculty Council the following proposed changes in the requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Human Development and Family Sciences in the College of Natural Science chapter in The Undergraduate Catalog, 2004-2006. The dean and the College of Natural Sciences Course and Curriculum Committee approved the proposal on November 18, 2002. The secretary has classified this proposal as legislation of exclusive application and primary interest to a single college or school.

The edited proposal was received from the Office of Official Publications on April 15, 2003, and was sent to the Committee on Undergraduate Degree Program Review from the Office of the General Faculty on April 23, 2003. The committee forwarded the proposed changes to the Office of the General Faculty on may 6, 2003, recommending approval. The authority to grant final approval on behalf of the General Faculty resides with the Faculty Council.

If no objection is filed with the Office of the General Faculty by the date specified below, the legislation will be held to have been approved by the Faculty Council. If objection is filed within the prescribed period, the legislation will be presented to the Faculty Council at its next meeting. The objection, with reasons, must be signed by a member of the Faculty Council.

To be counted, a protest must be received in the Office of the General Faculty by May 16, 2003.

 

<signed>

John R. Durbin, Secretary
The Faculty Council


This legislation was posted on the Faculty Council Web site (http://www.utexas.edu/faculty/council/) on May 7, 2003. Paper copies are available on request from the Office of the General Faculty, FAC 22, F9500.


2516


PROPOSED CHANGES IN THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND FAMILY SCIENCES IN THE COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES CHAPTER IN THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 2004-2006

On page 427, in the section DEGREES, under the heading BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND FAMILY SCIENCE, make the following changes.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND FAMILY SCIENCES

{No change to introductory text}

PRESCRIBED WORK

COMMON TO BOTH OPTIONS

{No change to requirements 1 through 4}

5. Six semester hours of coursework in biology and/or chemistry: and six additional hours chosen from the following fields: astronomy, biology, chemistry, computer sciences, geological sciences, mathematics, nutrition, and physics. Courses designed for nonscience majors may not be counted toward this requirement; students should consult the Department of Human Ecology for a list of courses that may be counted.

{No change to requirements 6 and 7}

Rationale: This change allows students to pursue science courses from biology and chemistry, providing students with more flexibility in course choice.

8. No fewer than thirty-nine but no more than forty-eight semester hours in the Department of Human Ecology, including Human Development and Family Sciences 304, 312, 313, 113L, 333L, [652F or two sections of 335,] and 260[,]; six hours chosen from Human Development and Family Sciences 352, 652F, and 355; and Nutrition 311.

{No further changes}

Rationale: This change creates more flexibility for the students. Currently, students are required to take HDF 652F, a twenty hour per week for one semester applied practicum, or two sections of HDF 355, a ten hour per week for one semester research practicum. Due to the nature of the differences of these programs, students are forced to choose between research and applied experiences. HDF 652F, due to its extensive outside commitment of hours, limits additional courses students can take, and forces some to consider extending their academic career another semester for just this one course. In addition, students are choosing the research or applied practicum based on which one fits into their schedule, not based on which one best meets their career and academic needs and goals. Faculty found that students enrolled in their practicum may or may not have an interest in the chosen topic or site. This change allows students to 1) break the applied practicum into two semesters; 2) gain experience in an applied and a research practicum setting; and 3) take courses that they find most relevant for their career and academic goals.