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DOCUMENTS OF THE GENERAL FACULTY

PROPOSED CHANGES TO THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION CHAPTER OF
THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 2004-2006


Dean Manuel Justiz of the College of Education has filed with the secretary of the Faculty Council the following proposed changes in the College of Education chapter in The Undergraduate Catalog, 2004-2006. The faculty of the department and the dean approved the proposed changes on October 2, 2003. The dean submitted the changes to the secretary on October 13, 2003. The secretary has classified this proposal as legislation of exclusive application and primary interest to a single college or school.

The edited proposal was received from the Office of Official Publications on March 22, 2004, and was sent to the Committee on Undergraduate Degree Program Review from the Office of the General Faculty on March 23, 2004. The committee forwarded the proposed changes to the Office of the General Faculty on April 1, 2004, recommending approval. The authority to grant final approval on behalf of the General Faculty resides with the Faculty Council.

If no objection is filed with the Office of the General Faculty by the date specified below, the legislation will be held to have been approved by the Faculty Council. If objection is filed within the prescribed period, the legislation will be presented to the Faculty Council at its next meeting. The objection, with reasons, must be signed by a member of the Faculty Council.

To be counted, a protest must be received in the Office of the General Faculty by noon on April 16, 2004.

< signed>



Sue Alexander Greninger, Secretary
The Faculty Council




This legislation was posted on the Faculty Council Web site (http://www.utexas.edu/faculty/council/) on April 8, 2004. Paper copies are available on request from the Office of the General Faculty, FAC 22, F9500.

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PROPOSED CHANGES TO THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION CHAPTER OF
THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 2004-2006


On page 102, in the College of Education chapter of The Undergraduate Catalog, 2002-2004, under the heading, ADMISSION AND REGISTRATION, make the following changes:


ADMISSION AND REGISTRATION

Admission and readmission of all students to the University is the responsibility of the director of admissions. Information about admission to the University is given in General Information.

Information about admission to teacher preparation programs is available in the Office of the Dean, George I. Sánchez Building 216.

REGISTRATION

General Information gives information about registration, adding and dropping courses, transfer from one division of the University to another, and auditing a course. The Course Schedule, published before registration each semester and summer session, includes registration instructions, advising locations, and the times, places, and instructors of classes. The Course Schedule and General Information are sold at campus-area bookstores. They are also published on the World Wide Web and are accessible through the registrar’s Web site, http://www.utexas.edu/student/registrar/.

ACADEMIC ADVISING

The College of Education encourages all students seeking a Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology to have their schedules approved by a faculty adviser. Those seeking a Bachelor of Science in Applied Learning and Development [may self-advise when they register but are urged to see an academic adviser if any question arises. Students] are [also] encouraged to see their advisers [at least once a semester outside] during the registration period and at least once a semester outside the registration period for a more comprehensive discussion of their programs. Academic advisers are available in George I. Sánchez Building 216 and Bellmont Hall 222.

ADMISSION TO THE PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SEQUENCE

All students seeking teacher certification must complete a sequence of professional development courses. Admission to the professional development sequence is restricted, and students must apply for admission to it. Academic performance, completion of prerequisite courses, documented evidence of proficiency in reading and in oral and written communication, and the number of hours needed to complete the program may be factors in the admission decision.

For students seeking early childhood through grade four or all-level generic special education certification, admission to the professional development sequence requires a University grade point average of at least 2.50 and a grade of at least C in each prerequisite course and in each course in the major. To progress within the sequence, the student must maintain a University grade point average of at least 2.50 and must earn a grade of at least C in each course in the sequence. Additional information about these requirements is available in the Office of the Dean.

For students in other teacher certification programs, admission and continuance requirements for the professional development sequence are set by the college in which the student majors.



RATIONALE: The College of Education Undergraduate Curriculum Committee is recommending that students maintain a minimum GPA to enter and progress within the professional development sequence leading

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to teacher certification. In the past students, who have not maintained the recommended C or better GPA in their coursework have struggled with the intensive nature of the professional sequence. In some cases these students did not complete the sequence or did not pass state certification exams. We feel that it is very important that we recommend to the state only the most qualified students for certification.


On pages 103-108, in the College of Education chapter of The Undergraduate Catalog, 2002-2004, under the heading, DEGREES, make the following changes:


DEGREES

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS


1. Students seeking early childhood through grade four certification must complete in residence at least twenty-four semester hours in the professional development sequence, including student teaching. Residence credit includes only courses taken at the University; it does not include credit by examination, [or] courses taken by extension or correspondence, or courses taken at another institution.

2. Except as otherwise indicated, credit by examination is treated as any other earned credit in meeting degree requirements.

3. With the exception of credit earned by examination, each course counted toward the degree or toward certification requirements must be taken on the letter-grade basis, unless the course is offered only on the pass/fail basis. Credit earned by examination on the pass/fail basis may be counted toward degree and certification requirements.

4. To graduate, all students must have a University grade point average of at least 2.00.

5. A student may not earn both the Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology and the Bachelor of Arts with an intercollege major in kinesiology and health.


RATIONALE: This policy has been in place since the Bachelor of Arts with a major in Intercollege Kinesiology (now Kinesiology and Health - Intercollege) was first offered, for more than 20 years. In the 2002-2004 catalog, the major requirements were included in the liberal arts chapter for the first time, but this policy statement was omitted in error. The College of Liberal Arts has submitted a proposal to add this statement to the liberal arts chapter.


APPLICABILITY OF CERTAIN COURSES

{No changes to Physical Activity Courses, ROTC Courses}
CORRESPONDENCE AND EXTENSION COURSES

Credit that a University student in residence earns simultaneously by correspondence or extension from the University or elsewhere or in residence at another school will not be counted toward a degree in the College of Education unless specifically approved in advance by the dean. In the semester they plan to graduate, students may not take any course to be counted toward the degree at another institution or by correspondence; students who plan to graduate at the end of the summer session may request approval to take correspondence or transfer work only in the first summer term.

No more than 30 percent of the semester hours required by any degree offered in the College of Education may be taken by correspondence.


RATIONALE: In the past, allowing students to take courses out-of-residence in their final semester has caused problems with certifying their graduation on time.

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BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN APPLIED LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT

[A total of at least 130 semester hours of credit, forty-two of which must be upper-division, is required for the degree.]

The curriculum for the degree has three components: (a) basic education requirements, (b) major requirements, and (c) electives. Students [may major in applied learning and development] choose one of three majors: early childhood through grade four generalist, which can lead to early childhood through grade four generalist certification[,] or early childhood through grade four bilingual generalist certification[, or early childhood through grade four generalist certification with dual certification in generic special education for early childhood through grade twelve]; all-level generic special education, which can lead to all-level generic special education certification; or [in] youth and community studies, which does not lead to teacher certification.

BASIC EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS

The basic education requirements below apply to [both] all majors leading to the Bachelor of Science in Applied Learning and Development.

AREA A: ENGLISH COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE, WRITING, FOREIGN LANGUAGE

1. English composition and literature: Rhetoric and Composition 306, English 316K, and three additional semester hours in English or rhetoric and composition. In addition, three semester hours of literature for children is required; [Library and Information Science] Information Studies 322T is acceptable.

2. Writing: In addition to Rhetoric and Composition 306 and English 316K, the student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component. These courses are identified in the Course Schedule. One of these two courses must be at the upper-division level.

3. Foreign language: All beginning students entering the College of Education must have completed two years in a single foreign language in high school. In addition, students must demonstrate proficiency in a single foreign language equivalent to that shown by completion of the second college semester in the language; proficiency is usually shown by earning credit for language courses 506 and 507 or the equivalent. Prospective Texas teachers are strongly encouraged to take Spanish to fulfill the language requirement.
Although the foreign language requirement is the attainment of a certain proficiency, rather than the completion of a specified number of hours, the courses taken to gain this proficiency are not electives and may not be taken on the pass/fail basis. Any part of the requirement may be fulfilled by credit by examination.
Courses used to fulfill the foreign language requirement must be language courses; literature-in-translation courses, for example, may not be counted.
College of Education students may substitute nine semester hours in specific multicultural andlanguage/communication courses for the foreign language requirement. This program is [open] available only to students who have completed two years of a single foreign language in high school. A list of the acceptable substitute courses is available in the Student Dean’s Office, George I. Sánchez Building 216.

AREA B: SOCIAL SCIENCES

1. History 315K and 315L, or six semester hours in other United States history courses that fulfill the legislative requirement described in chapter 1.

2. Government 310L and 312L.

[3. Geography 305.]

[4.] 3. Psychology 301.


AREA C: MATHEMATICS AND NATURAL SCIENCES

1. Three semester hours chosen from Mathematics 302, 303D, 305G, and 316. Coursework in calculus may be substituted for all or part of this three-semester-hour requirement.

2. Six semester hours in one of the following: astronomy, biology, chemistry, geological sciences, physical science, and physics.


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3. Three additional semester hours in computer applications, astronomy, biology, chemistry, geological sciences, physical science, physics, experimental psychology, physical anthropology, physical geography, or history of science and philosophy of science.

4. Geography 301C.

At least one laboratory course must be taken as part of the science requirement.


RATIONALE: The Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board has mandated that our early childhood to grade four teacher certification programs include an additional science course. Since we feel that geography is an important component for all elementary teachers, we have deleted the cultural geography requirement (GRG 305) and added a physical geography course (GRG 301C).


AREA D: GENERAL CULTURE

1. Three semester hours in art (including art history, design, studio art, visual art studies), music (including music, instruments, ensemble), or theatre and dance.

2. Three semester hours in architecture, courses offered by the College of Fine Arts, classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), or philosophy (excluding courses in logic).

[3. For teacher certification students, documented evidence of proficiency in oral communication. Proficiency is assessed in Curriculum and Instruction 331C. Students who lack speech proficiency must take three semester hours chosen from the following courses: Communication Studies 306M, Theatre and Dance 303, 303C, 326C, and 326D.]

It is recommended that teacher certification students meet requirements 1 and 2 with six semester hours chosen from Music 313, 354D, Theatre and Dance 326C, 326D, Visual Art Studies 221C, 121D, 222C, and 122D, since these courses cover the essential elements of knowledge in the fine arts needed by an elementary school teacher.

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

[APPLIED LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT] EARLY CHILDHOOD THROUGH GRADE FOUR GENERALIST


Students who have completed the early childhood through grade four generalist major [in applied learning and development may be entitled] are eligible to teach prekindergarten through grade four after meeting additional state requirements. By [following certain] choosing appropriate options within this program, students may alsobecome qualified for certification in bilingual education [or special education].

For [the major in applied learning and development] this major, students must complete the following in addition to the basic education requirements and electives.

1. Prescribed work in applied learning and development:
a. Three semester hours in human development chosen from Human Development and Family Sciences 313 and Psychology 304.
b. Three semester hours in cognition and learning chosen from Applied Learning and Development 320 and 321.
c. Applied Learning and Development 322.
d. Three semester hours in the development and learning of language and literacy chosen from Applied Learning and Development 324, 325, [326,] Psychology 338K, and Special Education 378T (Topic 1: Language-Minority Students in Special Education).1
e. Applied Learning and Development 327.
f. Applied Learning and Development 328.

2. A curricular specialization consisting of Curriculum and Instruction 670E (Topic 19: Reading/Language


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  Arts), Kinesiology 314 and 333, Mathematics 316K and 316L, and either Special Education 378T (Topic: Reading Difficulties, Disabilities, and Dyslexia)[,] or [the equivalent] Curriculum and Instruction 371R.

3.

A minor of at least fifteen semester hours, at least six of which must be upper-division, in any other approved field of study in the University. At least six of the required fifteen semester hours must be taken in residence. No more than six semester hours in the minor may count toward other degree requirements. Information about approved areas of study and specific courses that may be used is available in the Student Dean’s Office, George I. Sánchez Building 216.
Students seeking bilingual education certification [or special education] must complete a minor in that area.

4. Prescribed work in professional development[. Admission to the professional development sequence is restricted; information about admission requirements is available in the Office of the Dean. The professional development courses are]:
a. Methods courses: Curriculum and Instruction 370E (Topic 5: Mathematics), 370E (Topic 3: Science), and 370E (Topic 4: Social Studies).
b. Curriculum and Instruction 331C (Topic 1: School Organization and Classroom Management in Elementary Schools).
c. Curriculum and Instruction 371 (Topic 19: Guiding Young Children in Groups).
d. Curriculum and Instruction 950E [or, for those with a student teaching emphasis in special education, Special Education 960].


Students seeking bilingual education [or special education] certification must take a special sequence of these professional development courses with an appropriate emphasis.
Admission to the professional development sequence is restricted; admission requirements are given on page 102.


1.return Students who wish to include bilingual education certification must take Applied Learning and Development 325[; those who wish to include special education certification must take Applied Learning and Development 326].


ALL-LEVEL GENERIC SPECIAL EDUCATION

Students who have completed the all-level generic special education major are eligible to teach in special education classrooms from prekindergarten through the twelfth grade after meeting additional state requirements.

For this major, students must complete the following in addition to the basic education requirements and electives.

1. Prescribed work in applied learning and development:
a. Three semester hours in human development chosen from Human Development and Family Sciences 313 and Psychology 304.
b. Three semester hours in cognition and learning chosen from Applied Learning and Development 320 and 321.
c. Applied Learning and Development 322, 326, 327, and 328.


2. A curricular specialization consisting of Kinesiology 314 and Mathematics 316K and 316L.

3. Prescribed work in special education:
a. Special Education 322, 372, 675, 376, and 377.
b. Special Education 378T (Topic 4: Reading Difficulties within Diverse Populations), 378T (Topic 2: Advanced Early Childhood Intervention), 378T (Topic 3: Assessment Practices in Autism and Developmental Disabilities), and 378T (Topic 5: Teaching Individuals with Autism and Developmental Disabilities).

4. Prescribed work in professional development:

a. Curriculum and Instruction 370E (Topic 5: Mathematics) and 670E (Topic 19: Reading/Language Arts).
b. Curriculum and Instruction 331E.

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c. Special Education 960.
Admission to the professional development sequence is restricted; admission requirements are given on page 102.



RATIONALE for new major:

Currently, students who complete the special education teacher certification program obtain a Bachelor of Science in Applied Learning and Development degree, earn an early childhood through grade four teaching certificate, and earn a supplemental special education early childhood through grade twelve certificate. Because of credit hour constraints, the 139 credit hour program has focused exclusively on preparing individuals to teach students with mild to moderate disabilities (learning disabilities, behavior disorders, and cognitive impairments). However, data collected recently from program graduates indicate that approximately 40% of the department’s graduates teach students with severe disabilities (autism, severe cognitive impairments, and severe behavior disorders). Therefore, under the current program, we are unable to adequately prepare program graduates to work with the array of students whom they will be expected to teach.

Adding the special education certificate program that is required to adequately prepare special education teachers to teach all grade levels and all levels of severity to an EC–4 certificate will lengthen a student’s program to exceed the 139-credit-hour limit allowed for an undergraduate program. Therefore, the faculty of the Department of Special Education propose to adopt an all-level (stand-alone) special education teacher preparation program that is more responsive to the unique needs of preparing special education teachers. The all-level (stand-alone) program option allows the faculty of the Department of Special Education to modify the existing preparation program to enable program graduates to successfully teach students with a range of disabilities and of severity (mild-severe), across a broad age span (preK–12), and in a variety of settings (inclusive, resource, and self-contained classroom settings).

The program is designed in accord with the newly adopted, and approved by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), guidelines established by the Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) Performance-Based Standards for Beginning Special Education Teachers.


YOUTH AND COMMUNITY STUDIES

Completion of a major in youth and community studies does not entitle the student to receive a teaching certificate. For this major the student must complete basic education requirements, prescribed work in applied learning and development, prescribed work in a minor, prescribed work in professional development, and electives.

1. Basic education requirements: The coursework described on page 104, with the following modifications:
a. A fourth course in English or rhetoric and composition may be counted toward the Area A English composition and literature requirement in place of the children’s literature course.
b. [A course in economics or anthropology may be counted toward the Area B requirement in place of Geography 305] Students must take a three-semester-hour course in anthropology, economics, geography, or sociology in addition to the Area B social studies requirement.
c. [A course in sociology may be counted toward the Area B requirement in place of Psychology 301] A laboratory course is not required as part of the Area C mathematics and natural sciences requirement.

2. Prescribed work in applied learning and development:
a. Three semester hours chosen from Educational Psychology 332, 363M (Topic 3: Adolescent Development), Human Development and Family Sciences 313, Psychology 304, 309, and other approved courses.
b. Applied Learning and Development 320 or 321, 322, and 327.
c. Three semester hours chosen from Applied Learning and Development 324, 325, 326, and other approved courses.


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d. Three additional semester hours of coursework in applied learning and development.
e. [Kinesiology 314 and 333] Six semester hours of coursework in kinesiology.

3. Prescribed work in a minor: Eighteen semester hours, nine of which must be upper-division, in a subject area outside the major that is approved by an academic adviser. No more than six semester hours may be counted toward both the minor and the basic education requirements.

4. Prescribed work in professional development: Eighteen semester hours of upper-division coursework in education approved by an academic adviser in the dean’s office. Registration in the professional development sequence is restricted to those who have received approval for this major from an academic adviser. Before beginning the professional development sequence, students must have a University grade point average of at least 2.00.

ELECTIVES

Additional elective coursework may be needed to provide the total [of 130] number of semester hours required for the [Bachelor of Science in Applied Learning and Development] student’s major. The early childhood through grade four generalist major and the youth and community studies major require 130 hours of coursework; the early childhood through grade four generalist major with bilingual generalist certification requires 139 hours of coursework; and the all-level generic special education major requires 133 hours of coursework. Students in all majors must complete at least 42 hours of upper-division coursework.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN KINESIOLOGY

{No changes to introductory paragraphs}

BASIC EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS

The basic education requirements below apply to [the] all majors leading to the Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology degree. However, the kinesiology teacher certification option calls for specific courses to meet some of the basic education requirements; information about these modifications is available in the advising offices in George I. Sánchez Building 216 and Bellmont Hall 222.

AREA A: ENGLISH COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE, WRITING, FOREIGN LANGUAGE

1. English composition and literature: Rhetoric and Composition 306 and English 316K.

2. Writing: In addition, the student must complete six semester hours in courses certified as having a substantial writing component. These courses are identified in the Course Schedule. At least three of these six semester hours must be at the upper-division level.

3. Foreign language: All beginning students entering the College of Education must have completed two years in a single foreign language in high school. In addition, students must demonstrate proficiency in a single foreign language equivalent to that shown by completion of the second college semester in the language; proficiency is usually shown by earning credit for language courses 506 and 507 or the equivalent. Prospective Texas teachers are strongly encouraged to take Spanish to fulfill the language requirement.
Although the foreign language requirement is the attainment of a certain proficiency rather than the completion of a specified number of hours, the courses taken to gain this proficiency are not electives and may not be taken on the pass/fail basis. Any part of the requirement may be fulfilled by credit by examination.
Courses used to fulfill the foreign language requirement must be language courses; literature-in-translation courses, for example, may not be counted.
College of Education students may substitute nine semester hours in specific multicultural and language/communication courses for the foreign language requirement. This program is open only to students who have completed two years of a single foreign language in high school. A list of acceptable substitute courses is available in the Student Dean’s Office, George I. Sánchez Building 216.


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AREA B: SOCIAL SCIENCES

1. History 315K and 315L, or six semester hours in other United States history courses that fulfill the legislative requirement described in chapter 1.

2. Government 310L and 312L.

3. Psychology 301.

4. Three semester hours in anthropology, economics, geography, linguistics, or sociology.

AREA C: MATHEMATICS AND NATURAL SCIENCES

1. Three semester hours of mathematics. Kinesiology and athletic training majors must complete either Mathematics 305G or coursework in calculus. Health promotion and fitness and sport management majors may choose any mathematics course, excluding Mathematics 301.

2. Biology 211 and 212, or Biology 301L.

3. Six semester hours of chemistry. Chemistry 313N and 314N are recommended.

4. Five or six additional semester hours chosen from astronomy, biology, chemistry, computer applications, computer sciences, geological sciences, mathematics, physical science, physics, experimental psychology, physical anthropology, physical geography, and history of science and philosophy of science. A computer applications course and Chemistry 113P and 114P are recommended to fulfill this requirement. Health promotion and fitness majors may also count coursework in computer literacy and management information systems toward this requirement.

Kinesiology majors seeking teacher certification must take at least one laboratory course as part of the science requirement.

AREA D: GENERAL CULTURE

1. Three semester hours in architecture, art (including art history, design, studio art, visual art studies), classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), drama, fine arts, music (including music, instruments, ensemble), philosophy (excluding courses in logic), or theatre and dance.

2. Communication Studies 306M.

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

ATHLETIC TRAINING2


Students who plan to major in athletic training must apply for admission to the program. Information about the admission process is available from an academic adviser.

For the athletic training major, students must complete

1. The basic education requirements given above for the Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology[.], with the following modifications:
a. Students pursuing National Athletic Trainers’ Association Board of Certification (NATABOC) athletic training certification must also complete [Educational Psychology 367 (Topic 1: Introduction to Individual Counseling and Psychotherapy) and] Pharmacy 338. [These courses] This course may be counted toward the degree as [electives] an elective.
b. In fulfilling the Area C mathematics and natural sciences requirement, athletic training majors must complete Biology 309D.
c. In fulfilling the Area D general culture requirement, athletic training majors must complete Classical Civilization 306M.

2. Prescribed work in the area of specialization:
a. Major: Forty-five semester hours, consisting of
1. Kinesiology 119 (Topic 10: Conditioning).
2. Kinesiology 219K (Topic 3: Introduction to Athletic Training).
[3. Kinesiology 312 (Topic 2: Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries).]

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[4.] 3. Kinesiology [324] 324K.
[5.] 4. Kinesiology 325K.
[6.] 5. Kinesiology 326K.
[7.] 6. The following topics of Kinesiology 352K: Topic 15: Clinical Evaluation of Athletic Injuries in the Upper Body; Topic 13: Sport Nutrition; Topic 20: Topics in Athletic Training; Topic 22: [Clinical Evaluation of Athletic Injuries and Illnesses] Clinical Evaluation of Athletic Injuries in the Lower Body; Topic 19: Therapeutic Modalities in Athletic Training; Topic 24: Advanced Athletic Training: Therapeutic Exercise and Rehabilitation; Topic 21: [Organization and Administration of Athletic Training Programs] Athletic Training Program Administration.
[8.] 7. Twelve hours of elective coursework in kinesiology, including at least nine hours of upper-division coursework. Students pursuing NATABOC certification must complete a fieldwork course (Kinesiology 127L, 227L, 327L, or the equivalent) each semester of the clinical rotation. Up to six hours of this fieldwork may be counted toward the degree as electives.

b. Minor: Fifteen semester hours of coursework outside kinesiology, nine of which must be upper-division. Additional information is available from an academic adviser.




2.return2 [Final approval of this major is pending.] The athletic training major is in candidacy with the Joint Review Committee on Educational Programs in Athletic Training (JRC-AT). Accreditation is not guaranteed.



RATIONALE: All of the above recommended changes in the athletic training major are mandated by the national accrediting body.


KINESIOLOGY

{No changes}

HEALTH PROMOTION AND FITNESS

For the health promotion and fitness major, students must complete

1. The basic education requirements given above for the Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology. Students must also provide evidence of proficiency in computing. They may demonstrate this proficiency by completing three hours of coursework in computer sciences, management information systems, or computer literacy as part of the work taken to fulfill the Area C requirement.

2. Prescribed work in the area of specialization:
a. Major: Forty-five semester hours, consisting of
1. Twenty-one hours of core coursework: Kinesiology 324K, 310 or 325K, 352K (Topic 4: Management of Sport and Health Promotion Programs), 352K (Topic: Diagnosis and Evaluation of Fitness), 370K (Topic 2: Introduction to Health Promotion), 373, and 377.
2. Nine [semester] hours of elective coursework [in kinesiology approved by the undergraduate adviser.] chosen from the following: Kinesiology 310, 119, 325K, 326K, 327L (Topic 5: Personal Training), 327L (Topic 6: Clinical Exercise Testing), 333, 352K (Topic 7: Psychosocial Issues in Women’s Health), 352K (Topic 8: Children’s Exercise and Physical Activity), 352K (Topic 13: Sport Nutrition), 352K (Topic 16: Psychosocial Issues in Adult Development and Health), 352K (Topic 17: Psychological Aspects of Exercise), 352K (Topic: Physical Aging in America), 360, 366, 367, and 370K (Topic 3: Adolescent Health Risk Behavior). Kinesiology 119 core courses may be used for up to three of the nine hours of electives. Kinesiology 310 and 325K may not be counted as both core courses and electives; a single topic of Kinesiology 327L may not be counted as both a required professional development course and an elective. [Kinesiology 119, 127L, 227L, 327L, and 627L may not be used to fulfill this requirement.]
3. [A sequence] Fifteen hours of professional development courses within the major, consisting of Kinesiology 352K (Topic 12: Techniques of Fitness Leadership), 352K (Topic 14: Techniques of Health Promotion), 627L, and one of the following courses: Kinesiology 327L (Topic 1:



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  Fieldwork in Health Promotion), 327L [(Fieldwork: Personal Training)] (Topic 5: Personal Training), and 327L [(Fieldwork: Clinical Exercise Testing)] (Topic 6: Clinical Exercise Testing)[, and 627L]. [To enroll in the major professional development sequence, the student must have a grade point average in kinesiology of at least 2.50.]
b. Minor: Nutrition 311 and twelve additional semester hours, six of which must be upper-division, in [biology, business, communication, nutrition, psychology, sociology, or another approved subject] an area approved by an adviser. No more than three semester hours may be counted both toward the minor and toward the basic education requirements.



RATIONALE: The Department of Kinesiology would like to allow students more flexibility in choosing a track to follow within their major. This would allow students to focus on either a health promotion track or a fitness track, rather than just taking additional kinesiology courses.


SPORT MANAGEMENT

{No changes}

ELECTIVES

Additional semester hours of coursework to bring the total to 130 semester hours. No more than twelve semester hours in Kinesiology 127L, 227L, 327L, and 627L may be counted toward the degree.