View in portable document format.

3190


DOCUMENTS OF THE GENERAL FACULTY

PROPOSED CHANGES TO THE
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING IN THE
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING CHAPTER OF
THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 2004-2006

Dean Ben Streetman of the College of Engineering has filed with the secretary of the Faculty Council the following proposed changes to the career gateway elective options in the Bachelor of Science in mechanical engineering in the College of Engineering chapter in The Undergraduate Catalog, 2004-2006. The faculty of the department and the dean approved the proposed changes on January 30, 2004. The dean submitted the changes to the secretary on February 10, 2004. The secretary has classified this proposal as legislation of exclusive application and primary interest to a single college or school.

The edited proposal was received from the Office of Official Publications on March 22, 2004, and was sent to the Committee on Undergraduate Degree Program Review from the Office of the General Faculty on March 23, 2004. The committee forwarded the proposed changes to the Office of the General Faculty on April 6, 2004, recommending approval. The authority to grant final approval on behalf of the General Faculty resides with the Faculty Council.

If no objection is filed with the Office of the General Faculty by the date specified below, the legislation will be held to have been approved by the Faculty Council. If objection is filed within the prescribed period, the legislation will be presented to the Faculty Council at its next meeting. The objection, with reasons, must be signed by a member of the Faculty Council.

To be counted, a protest must be received in the Office of the General Faculty by noon on April 16, 2004.


<signed>

Sue Alexander Greninger, Secretary
The Faculty Council



This legislation was posted on the Faculty Council Web site (http://www.utexas.edu/faculty/council/) on April 8, 2004. Paper copies are available on request from the Office of the General Faculty, FAC 22, F9500.

3191


PROPOSED CHANGES TO THE
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING IN THE
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING CHAPTER OF
THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 2004-2006

On pages 167-169 under the heading DEGREES in the College of Engineering chapter of The Undergraduate Catalog, 2002-2004, make the following changes:


BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

{No change to introductory text}

CURRICULUM

Course requirements are divided into three categories: basic sequence courses, major sequence courses, and other required courses. Enrollment in major sequence courses is restricted to students who have received credit for all of the basic sequence courses and have been admitted to the major sequence by the College of Engineering Admissions Committee. (Requirements for admission to a major sequence are given on pages 126-127.) Enrollment in other required courses is not restricted by completion of the basic sequence.

[Courses used to fulfill technical and nontechnical elective requirements must be approved by] A member of the mechanical engineering faculty must approve courses used to fulfill the career gateway elective requirement before the student [enrolls in] registers for them. Courses that fulfill the social science and fine arts/humanities requirements are listed on pages 134-135.

COURSES

SEMESTER
HOURS


Basic Sequence Courses
  Chemistry 301, Engineering Mechanics 306, 319, Mathematics 408C, 408D, 427K, Mechanical Engineering 302, 205, 311, 111L, 324, 326, Physics 303K, 303L, 103M, 103N, Rhetoric and Composition 306
[43] 47

Major Sequence Courses

Mechanical Engineering 333T, 335, 336, 136L, 338, 339, 139L, [242L (or 130L and 139L),] 343, 344, 244L, 353, 366J, 266K, 266P
[36] 35
[Approved technical area electives
10]

Other Required Courses

  Electrical Engineering 331, [331K, Engineering Mechanics 319,] English 316K, Mechanical Engineering [111L,] 218, 330, 130L
[15] 12
  Approved career gateway electives
9
  American government, including Texas government
6
  American history
6
  Approved fine arts or humanities elective
3
  Approved mathematics elective
3
  Approved natural science/mathematics elective
3
  Approved social science elective
3
 
MINIMUM REQUIRED
[128] 127


RATIONALE: The Department of Mechanical Engineering elected to get back to an "even" number of elective hours--in the sense that nine hours will be fulfilled by a student's taking three 3-hour courses. With ten elective hours, students often ended up taking four 3-hour courses or three 3-hour courses and one 2-hour course, and

3192


this was not fair. The number of 2-hour courses in mechanical engineering was very limited because only a few faculty converted existing 3-hour courses to 2-hour courses.

CAREER GATEWAY ELECTIVE [TECHNICAL AREA] OPTIONS

[Each student must choose one of the technical area options described below. Those who wish to develop some specialization within mechanical engineering should choose the option from areas 1 through 6; those who wish to obtain a broader background should choose area 7, general mechanical engineering.]

The mechanical engineering curriculum includes nine hours of career gateway electives, selected by the student to support his or her career goals. Before registering for these courses, students must prepare a career plan statement and a list of relevant electives in consultation with a faculty mentor; this plan must be approved by the undergraduate adviser.

Career gateway electives may include traditional upper-division technical courses in mechanical engineering and other engineering fields, approved courses in business, computer sciences, and natural sciences, and preparatory courses for graduate study in the health professions. Students who pursue the Business Foundations or Elements of Computing program may count the program’s required courses as career gateway electives.

Career gateway elective programs may include up to three hours of special topics coursework (Mechanical Engineering 179M, 279M, 379M) and projects coursework (Mechanical Engineering 177K, 277K, 377K) without special approval. Students wishing to count additional topics or projects credit must petition for consent of the undergraduate adviser. Programs may also include three hours in Mechanical Engineering 325L.

Some possible career gateway elective options and related courses are listed below.


[AREA 1,] BIOMECHANICAL ENGINEERING

[There are many areas of biotechnology in which] Biomechanical engineering is one of the most exciting emerging areas of engineering, and mechanical engineers will play an important role in this field. [These] Areas of special interest include biomaterials, biomechanics, fluid flow, heat transfer, mechanical design, nuclear science, and systems analysis. This option also can be tailored to provide a background for professional education in medicine or dentistry or for [advanced] graduate study in biomedical engineering. [Mechanical Engineering 354 and 354M are required in this option.] Courses supporting a career in biomechanical engineering include

[Mechanical Engineering 337D, Radiation and Radiation Protection]
Mechanical Engineering 354, [Biomedical] Introduction to Biomechanical Engineering
Mechanical Engineering 354M, Biomechanics of Human Movement
Mechanical Engineering 372J, Robotics and Automation
[Mechanical Engineering 177K, Projects in Mechanical Engineering]
[Mechanical Engineering 179M, 279M, or 379M, Topics in Mechanical Engineering (approved topics related to biomechanical engineering). More than one topic may be counted as an area elective.]
Mechanical Engineering 379N, Engineering Acoustics
Approved biomedical engineering and natural science electives
[Approved biomechanical engineering elective, approved natural science elective, or Mechanical Engineering 325L, Cooperative Engineering (a maximum of one course)]

DYNAMICS AND CONTROL

The engineering of “intelligent machines” is a rapidly growing field, demanding an understanding of mechanical and electronic components, of software, and of the ways these elements interact in complex systems. Courses supporting career paths in this area include

3193


Mechanical Engineering 348C, Introduction to Mechatronics I
Mechanical Engineering 348D, Introduction to Mechatronics II
Mechanical Engineering 355K, Engineering Vibrations
Mechanical Engineering 364L, Automatic Control System Design
Mechanical Engineering 372J, Robotics and Automation
Mechanical Engineering 372M, Mechanism Design
Mechanical Engineering 372N, Design of Smart Mechanisms
Mechanical Engineering 379N, Engineering Acoustics
Approved electrical and computer engineering and natural science electives


MANUFACTURING AND DESIGN

Mechanical engineering is the focal point for design and manufacturing of components and systems ranging from automobiles to computer chips. The manufacturing and design option prepares students for leadership in this important field. Suggested courses include

Mechanical Engineering 350, Machine Tool Operations for Engineers
Mechanical Engineering 352K, Engineering Computer Graphics
Mechanical Engineering 364L, Automatic Control System Design
Mechanical Engineering 365K, Finite Element Method
Mechanical Engineering 365L, Industrial Design for Production
Mechanical Engineering 368J, Computer-Aided Design
Mechanical Engineering 372J, Robotics and Automation
Mechanical Engineering 372M, Mechanism Design
Mechanical Engineering 372N, Design of Smart Mechanisms
Approved engineering and natural science electives


[AREA 2,] MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

The design and manufacture of most engineering devices and systems is heavily constrained by materials properties and the availability of materials. [Many current mechanical engineering applications and designs are restricted because of limitations imposed by materials properties and by the availability of materials.] This option allows students to obtain [the BSME with] a concentration in materials science and engineering [and also provides the] as a basis for [pursuing advanced] practice and graduate study in this field. Relevant courses include

[Mechanical Engineering 347, Processing of Materials]
Mechanical Engineering 349, Corrosion Engineering
Mechanical Engineering [259,] 359, Materials Selection
[Mechanical Engineering 260K, Metallurgy of Engineering Alloys]
[Mechanical Engineering 261M, 361M, Materials Thermodynamics]
Mechanical Engineering 378C, Ceramic Engineering
Mechanical Engineering 378K, Mechanical Behavior of Materials
Mechanical Engineering 378P, Properties and Applications of Polymers
Mechanical Engineering 378S, Structural Ceramics
Approved materials-related engineering and natural science electives
[Mechanical Engineering 179M, 279M, or 379M, Topics in Mechanical Engineering (approved topics related to materials science and engineering). More than one topic may be counted as an area elective.
Supporting elective (one course chosen from the list on page 169)
]

[AREA 3, MECHANICAL SYSTEMS AND DESIGN]

[This option focuses on a number of topics related to mechanical systems and design. Courses are available to support study in analysis and design of control systems, machine design, manufacturing, robotics and automation, electromechanical devices, design methodology, and computer-aided design.]

3194


[Mechanical Engineering 335M, Electric Machinery and Magnetic Devices]
[Mechanical Engineering 348C, Introduction to Mechatronics I]
[Mechanical Engineering 348D, Introduction to Mechatronics II]
[Mechanical Engineering 350, Machine Tool Operations for Engineers]
[Mechanical Engineering 352K, Engineering Computer Graphics]
[Mechanical Engineering 355K, Fundamentals of Engineering Vibrations]
[Mechanical Engineering 364L, Automatic Control System Design]
[Mechanical Engineering 365K, Finite Element Method]
[Mechanical Engineering 365L, Industrial Design for Production]
[Mechanical Engineering 368J, Computer-Aided Design]
[Mechanical Engineering 372J, Robotics and Automation]
[Mechanical Engineering 372M, Mechanism Design]
[Mechanical Engineering 372N, Design of Smart Mechanisms]
[Mechanical Engineering 179M, 279M, or 379M, Topics in Mechanical Engineering (approved topics related to]
[Mechanical systems and design). More than one topic may be counted as an area elective.]
[Mechanical Engineering 379N, Engineering Acoustics]
[Supporting elective (one course chosen from the list on page 169)]

[AREA 4,] NUCLEAR AND RADIATION ENGINEERING

Engineers with a background in nuclear and radiation engineering find opportunities providing electrical power in safe, efficient, and environmentally benign ways for commercial or defense purposes; extending nuclear reactor plant life, in materials analysis; developing new ways of producing and using radioisotopes in medical physics for organ imaging or cancer therapy; developing new industrial applications for neutron or gamma-ray radiation use; [and] developing long-term strategies for radioactive waste disposal; and developing systems to maintain the security of nuclear materials. They also work with nuclear-related national security issues and in nuclear chemical engineering. It is recommended that students interested in this area take one or more of the following courses.

[Students may take either of the following options]

[Option 1: Nuclear Engineering]

Mechanical Engineering 136N, 236N, Concepts in Nuclear and Radiation Engineering
Mechanical Engineering 337C, Introduction to Nuclear Power Systems
[Mechanical Engineering 361E, Nuclear Reactor Engineering]
[Mechanical Engineering 177K, Projects in Mechanical Engineering (topics in nuclear and radiation engineering)] [Mechanical Engineering 179M, 279M, or 379M, Topics in Mechanical Engineering (approved topics related to nuclear and radiation engineering). More than one topic may be counted as an area elective.]

[Option 2: Radiation Engineering]

[Mechanical Engineering 136N, 236N, Concepts in Nuclear and Radiation Engineering]
Mechanical Engineering 337D, Radiation and Radiation Protection
Mechanical Engineering 337E, Radioactive Waste Management
Mechanical Engineering 361E, Nuclear Reactor Engineering
Mechanical Engineering 361F, Radiation and Radiation Protection Laboratory
[Mechanical Engineering 177K, Projects in Mechanical Engineering (topics in nuclear and radiation engineering)]
[Mechanical Engineering 179M, 279M, or 379M, Topics in Mechanical Engineering (approved topics related to nuclear and radiation engineering). More than one topic may be counted as an area elective.]

[AREA 5,] OPERATIONS RESEARCH AND INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING

3195


Today’s industrial planners and [technical] managers commonly use quantitative decision-making techniques. This option melds traditional industrial engineering and its modern outgrowth, operations research. Emphasis is on mathematical modeling, applied statistics, and the use of the computer to assist the decision maker. Students interested in [electing] this option [are expected to take at least nine hours of technical area electives from the following list.] should consider courses such as

Mechanical Engineering 366L, Operations Research Models
[Mechanical Engineering 366M, Operations Research Methods]
Mechanical Engineering 366Q, Deterministic Methods for Operations Research
Mechanical Engineering 366R, Stochastic Methods for Operations Research

Mechanical Engineering 367S, Simulation Modeling
Mechanical Engineering 373K, Basic Industrial Engineering
Mechanical Engineering 375K, Production Engineering Management
[Mechanical Engineering 179M, 279M, or 379M, Topics in Mechanical Engineering (approved topics related to operations research and industrial engineering). More than one topic may be counted as an area elective.]
[Mechanical Engineering 325L, Cooperative Engineering]
Approved engineering, business, or mathematics electives

[AREA 6,] THERMAL/FLUID SYSTEMS ENGINEERING

A traditional field of mechanical engineering is the design and manufacture of systems for the production, transmission, storage, and use of energy. This option prepares students for careers and graduate [emphasizes] study in energy conversion, thermal system design, thermodynamics, heat transfer, and fluid mechanics[, thermal energy conversion, and thermal systems design]. Suggested courses include

Aerospace Engineering 362K, Compressible Fluid Mechanics
Mechanical Engineering 337C, Introduction to Nuclear Power Systems
[Mechanical Engineering 335M, Electric Machinery and Magnetic Devices]
Mechanical Engineering 360L, Turbomachinery and Compressible Flow
Mechanical Engineering 360N, Intermediate Heat Transfer
Mechanical Engineering 361E, Nuclear Reactor Engineering
Mechanical Engineering 363L [263L], Energy Systems Laboratory
Mechanical Engineering 369L, Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics
Mechanical Engineering 374C, Combustion Engine Processes
Mechanical Engineering 374D [274D], Automotive Engineering Laboratory
Mechanical Engineering 374L, Design of Thermal Systems
Mechanical Engineering 374R [274R], Design of Air Conditioning Systems
Mechanical Engineering 374S, Solar Energy Systems Design
Approved engineering and natural science electives
[Mechanical Engineering 179M, 279M, or 379M, Topics in Mechanical Engineering (approved topics related to thermal/fluid systems engineering). More than one topic may be counted as an area elective.]
[Mechanical Engineering 379N, Engineering Acoustics]
[Supporting elective (one course chosen from the list below)]

[AREA 7, GENERAL MECHANICAL ENGINEERING]

[This option allows a student to choose courses from any of the preceding six areas and from the supporting electives listed below. No more than one of the following supporting electives may be included without approval of the undergraduate adviser: Mechanical Engineering 325L, 371K, 277K, 377K. ]

[SUPPORTING ELECTIVES]

[Mechanical Engineering 325L, Cooperative Engineering]
[Mechanical Engineering 371K, Legal Aspects of Engineering Practice]
[Mechanical Engineering 177K, 277K, or 377K, Projects in Mechanical Engineering]
[Students who choose their option program from areas 1 through 6 may use one course in the other five of these

3196


areas as a supporting elective.]


RATIONALE: The Mechanical Engineering curriculum committee approved the requested editorial changes in an effort to give the student flexibility. Implementing this change would also improve our recruiting and retention efforts.