View in portable document format.

3199


DOCUMENTS OF THE GENERAL FACULTY

PROPOSED CHANGES TO CLARIFY STANDARDS AND POLICIES IN
THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING CHAPTER OF
THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 2004-2006
Dean Ben Streetman of the College of Engineering has filed with the secretary of the Faculty Council the following proposed changes to clarify standards and policies in the College of Engineering chapter in The Undergraduate Catalog, 2004-2006. The faculty of the department and the dean approved the proposed changes on February 10, 2004. The dean submitted the changes to the secretary on January 30, 2004. The secretary has classified this proposal as legislation of exclusive application and primary interest to a single college or school.

The edited proposal was received from the Office of Official Publications on March 10, 2004, and was sent to the Committee on Undergraduate Degree Program Review from the Office of the General Faculty on March 15, 2004. The committee forwarded the proposed changes to the Office of the General Faculty on April 6, 2004, recommending approval. The authority to grant final approval on behalf of the General Faculty resides with the Faculty Council.

If no objection is filed with the Office of the General Faculty by the date specified below, the legislation will be held to have been approved by the Faculty Council. If objection is filed within the prescribed period, the legislation will be presented to the Faculty Council at its next meeting. The objection, with reasons, must be signed by a member of the Faculty Council.

To be counted, a protest must be received in the Office of the General Faculty by noon on April 16, 2004.


<signed>

Sue Alexander Greninger, Secretary
The Faculty Council



This legislation was posted on the Faculty Council Web site (http://www.utexas.edu/faculty/council/) on April 8, 2004. Paper copies are available on request from the Office of the General Faculty, FAC 22, F9500.

3200


PROPOSED CHANGES TO CLARIFY STANDARDS AND POLICIES IN
THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING CHAPTER OF
THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 2004-2006

On page 129, under the heading ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES in the section STANDARD OF WORK REQUIRED AND SCHOLASTIC POLICIES in the College of Engineering chapter of The Undergraduate Catalog, 2002-2004, make the following changes:


STANDARD OF WORK REQUIRED AND SCHOLASTIC POLICIES

In addition to [regulations given in] the scholastic standards described in General Information, the College of Engineering imposes the following academic standards. Students who fail to meet the regulations stated in General Information are placed on “scholastic probation” by the University. The probationary status given to those who fail to meet the following college standards is “academic probation.” In cases with extenuating circumstances, the student may petition the dean for a waiver of any of the following requirements.

1. A student is placed on academic probation in engineering under the following circumstances:
a. If, after the student has taken at least six semester hours in the major area of study, his or her grade point average in courses in the major area of study taken in residence falls below 2.00. The “major area of study” includes all courses taken [in residence] in the student’s discipline (biomedical, chemical, electrical, mechanical, or petroleum and geosystems engineering) and required under the student’s engineering degree plan. For architectural engineering and civil engineering majors, the major area includes all courses in both architectural engineering and civil engineering; for aerospace engineering majors, the major area includes all courses in both aerospace engineering and engineering mechanics; for geosystems engineering and hydrogeology majors, the major area includes all courses in both geological sciences and petroleum and geosystems engineering.
b. If the student’s grade point average in required technical courses taken in residence falls below 2.00. “Required technical courses” are courses taken in the College of Engineering or the College of Natural Sciences and required under the student’s engineering degree plan; they include approved technical elective courses. Courses required to overcome admission or prerequisite deficiencies are not considered in decisions on academic probation.

Grades received at the University in all courses in the major area, including grades in courses that have been repeated, are included in computing the student’s grade point average. [However, a student admitted to a major sequence may not use credit in lower-division courses for removal of grade point deficiencies in the major sequence.]

2. A student on academic probation in engineering will be removed from probation at the end of a long-session semester or summer session if the student is no longer subject to academic probation under either of the criteria above.

3. After being placed on academic probation in engineering, a student must be removed from probation within the next two long-session semesters in which he or she is registered. A student who fails to be removed from academic probation within this time will be placed on academic dismissal from the College of Engineering.

4. A student seeking to reenter the college after having been scholastically dismissed from the University must enroll as an undeclared major unless there is a reasonable likelihood that the student can complete the degree plan under which he or she last registered. A student seeking to reenter the college after having been academically dismissed must enroll as an undeclared major. Students who are undeclared majors may not enroll in engineering courses.

5. A student may transfer to the College of Engineering from another division of the University in accordance with the regulations given in General Information. [If a student transfers from the College of Engineering to another division while on academic probation and then returns to the college, the dean will provide the student with a written statement of his or her probationary status.]

6. To receive credit for any course, a student must earn a grade of D or better. However, admission to many courses requires a grade of at least C in prerequisite courses. Students should consult this catalog or the


3201


  department for specific grade requirements.

7. All students in scholastic or academic difficulty should discuss their status with an academic adviser in the Office of Student Affairs, Ernest Cockrell Jr. Hall 2.200.

[8.] [In cases with extenuating circumstances, the student may petition the dean for a waiver of any of the foregoing requirements.]


RATIONALE: Changes in the preceding section are for clarification.


PASS/FAIL OPTION

With the approval of the departmental undergraduate adviser, a student may elect to take the degree-required approved nontechnical electives or any extra courses (taken for benefit and not to be counted toward the degree) on the pass/fail basis rather than for a letter grade. All other courses required for the degree, and Mathematics 305G, Chemistry 304K, and Physics 306, if taken, must be taken for a letter grade.

To elect the pass/fail system of grading, a student must have received thirty semester hours of college credit. He or she may take no more than one course applicable to the degree program [(in addition to physical activity courses)] on this basis each semester. Credit by examination may be earned either on the pass/fail or on the letter-grade basis; such credit earned on the pass/fail basis is not counted toward the University's maximum of five courses taken pass/fail that may be counted toward the degree. For more information on how to receive credit by examination, see General Information.


RATIONALE: From the current second paragraph, the reader might infer that physical activity courses may be counted toward the degree. They may not. Because they may not, they are covered by the rule given in the first paragraph for courses “taken for benefit and not to be counted toward the degree.”