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DOCUMENTS OF THE GENERAL FACULTY

PROPOSED CHANGES TO THE BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING IN THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING CHAPTER OF THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 2004-2006

Dean Ben Streetman of the College of Engineering has filed with the secretary of the Faculty Council the following proposed changes to the Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Engineering in the College of Engineering chapter in The Undergraduate Catalog, 2004-2006. The faculty of the department and the dean approved the proposed changes on October 7, 2003. The dean submitted the changes to the secretary on November 14, 2003. The secretary has classified this proposal as legislation of exclusive application and primary interest to a single college or school.

The edited proposal was received from the Office of Official Publications on April 16, 2004, and was sent to the Committee on Undergraduate Degree Program Review from the Office of the General Faculty on April 19, 2004. The committee forwarded the proposed changes to the Office of the General Faculty on May 4, 2004, recommending approval. The authority to grant final approval on behalf of the General Faculty resides with the Faculty Council.

If no objection is filed with the Office of the General Faculty by the date specified below, the legislation will be held to have been approved by the Faculty Council. If objection is filed within the prescribed period, the legislation will be presented to the Faculty Council at its next meeting. The objection, with reasons, must be signed by a member of the Faculty Council.

To be counted, a protest must be received in the Office of the General Faculty by noon on May 13, 2004.


Sue Alexander Greninger, Secretary
The Faculty Council


This legislation was posted on the Faculty Council Web site (http://www.utexas.edu/faculty/council/) on May 5, 2004. Paper copies are available on request from the Office of the General Faculty, FAC 22, F9500.


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PROPOSED CHANGES TO THE BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING IN THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING CHAPTER OF THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 2004-2006

On pages 143-145, of The Undergraduate Catalog, 2002-2004, under heading DEGREES in the section BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING, please make the following changes:


BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING

{No change to introductory text}

CURRICULUM

Course requirements are divided into three categories: basic sequence courses, major sequence courses, and other required courses. Enrollment in major sequence courses is restricted to students who have received credit for all of the basic sequence courses and have been admitted to the major sequence by the College of Engineering Admissions Committee. (Requirements for admission to a major sequence are given on pages 126-127.) Enrollment in other required courses is not restricted by completion of the basic sequence.

Courses used to fulfill technical and nontechnical elective requirements must be approved by the [biomedical engineering faculty] Biomedical Engineering Undergraduate Advising Office before the student [enrolls in] registers for them. Courses that fulfill the social science and fine arts/humanities requirements are listed on pages 134-135. The student must take all courses required for the degree on the letter-grade basis and must earn a grade of at least C in each.


RATIONALE: Changes are for clarification.


COURSES

SEMESTER
 HOURS


Basic Sequence Courses
  Biology 205L or 206L, 211, 212, [205L,] Biomedical Engineering 102, 303, 314, Chemistry 302, 204, [618A,] 118K, 318M, Mathematics 408C, 408D, 427K,
Physics 303K, 303L, 103M, 103N, Rhetoric and Composition 306
[44] 45

Major Sequence Courses

Biomedical Engineering 221, 333T, 335, 348, 251, 353, 360, 365R, 365S, 370, 371
31
Approved technical area electives
18
Biomedical engineering senior electives
6

Other Required Courses

  Chemistry 353, Electrical Engineering 312, English 316K
9
  One of the following:
  For students in technical [area 1] areas 1A and 1B: Biomedical Engineering 311,  
  Electrical Engineering 322C; for those in technical area 2: Chemical Engineering 350,  
  Chemistry 369; for those in technical area 3: Chemistry 369, Electrical Engineering 322C
6
  American government, including Texas government
6
  American history
6
  Approved social science elective
3
  Approved fine arts or humanities elective
3
 
MINIMUM REQUIRED
[132] 133



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RATIONALE: The BME Undergraduate Committee reviewed the progress of its first academic year. After further discussion about retention concerns, it was decided that we needed to develop a one-hour course to introduce students (1) to the BME program; (2) to the differences between the technical areas; and (3) to the latest developments in biotechnology. The course is designed to give the student a broader understanding of the field of biomedical engineering as well as departmental expectations of the student. Implementing BME 102 would improve our recruiting and retention efforts.


TECHNICAL AREA OPTIONS

The technical area option allows the student to choose eighteen semester hours of technical area coursework in biomedical imaging and instrumentation, cellular and biomolecular engineering, or computational biomedical engineering. Each student should choose a technical area by the end of the sophomore year and plan an academic program to meet the area requirements in the next two years.

Preparation for health professions. Students who plan to go on the medical, veterinary, or dental school in Texas must complete coursework in addition to that required for the BSBmE in order to meet professional school admission requirements; those who plan to attend schools outside Texas may need further additional coursework. The student is responsible for knowing and meeting these additional requirements, but assistance and information are available from the Health Professions Office in the College of Natural Sciences.

TECHNICAL AREA 1, BIOMEDICAL IMAGING AND INSTRUMENTATION

The [main educational] objective of this area is to bring together [new advances in imaging science, molecular markers of disease, and biomedical instrumentation and to use them in translational research. An important emphasis is the use of optical imaging for disease detection. Students must take Biomedical Engineering 311, Network Theory, in the sophomore year. In addition, all students in area 1 must take the following four courses:] students with knowledge and skills in the general area of medical instrumentation, and image science. A solid foundation is established in analog and digital network analysis. Technical area 1A emphasizes instrumentation while technical area 1B examines biomedical image processing for medical applications. Students must complete the following four courses:

Biomedical Engineering 343, Biomedical Engineering Signal and Systems Analysis
Electrical Engineering 319K, Introduction to Microcontrollers
Electrical Engineering 438, Electronic Circuits I
Electrical Engineering 345S, Real-Time Digital Signal Processing Laboratory

[Students then complete two elective courses, for a total of at least six semester hours, in one of the following options:]

In addition, students must complete six hours of coursework in one of the following options:

Option A: Digital Applications

Biomedical Engineering 374K, Biomedical Electronics[,] and Biomedical Engineering 374L, Applications of Biomedical Engineering Laboratory

Or

Electrical Engineering 345L, Microprocessor Applications and Organization[,] and Electrical Engineering 345M, Embedded and Real-Time Systems Laboratory

Option B: Imaging Applications

Astronomy 376, Topic: Astronomical Instrumentation


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Biomedical Engineering 357, Biomedical Imaging Modalities Laboratory
Electrical Engineering 347, Modern Optics
Electrical Engineering 351M, Digital Signal Processing
Electrical Engineering 371R, Digital Image and Video Processing
[Physics 333 Modern Optics, and Physics 133L, Laboratory for Physics 333]

TECHNICAL AREA 2, CELL AND BIOMOLECULAR ENGINEERING

The major objective of this area is to teach students how to integrate knowledge in cell and molecular biology with engineering analysis, so that they can address problems in molecular-based medicine. Three disciplines within this technical area [track] are tissue engineering as it relates to the underlying molecular biology issues; materials science, with an emphasis on bioactive materials and construction of nanoscale devices and probes; and bioengineering analysis of infectious diseases and immunological responses. [Students must take Chemical Engineering 350, Chemical Engineering Materials, in the sophomore year. In addition, students] Students must take the following three courses:

Biology 325, Genetics
Biomedical Engineering 339, Biochemical Engineering
Biomedical Engineering 352, Advanced Engineering Biomaterials

In addition, [Students] students must complete [three electives] nine hours of coursework from the following list; at least one course must have a laboratory and at least one must be in engineering.

Biology 323L, Laboratory Studies in Cell Biology
Biology 325L, Laboratory Experience in Genetics
Biology 226R, General Microbiology: Microbial Cell Structure and Genetics, and Biology 126L, General Microbiology Laboratory
Biology 344, Molecular Biology
Biomedical Engineering 354, Molecular Sensors and Nanodevices for Biomedical Engineering Applications
Biomedical Engineering 379, Cell and Tissue Engineering
[Chemistry 618B, Organic Chemistry, and] Chemistry 118K, Organic Chemistry Laboratory; Chemistry 318M, Organic Chemistry I; and Chemistry 318N, Organic Chemistry II

TECHNICAL AREA 3, COMPUTATIONAL BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING

The objective of this area is to provide students with the knowledge and skills that will enable them to use computational algorithms and techniques in engineering and information science to study problems [encountered in cell and molecular biology. For example, computer simulations of the molecular processes inside cells may help pharmaceutical researchers to predict the effects of drugs on humans; computational prognostics and diagnostics that combine clinical data with patient-specific genotyping and molecular profiling may lead to improved choices of therapies for individual patients.] in biomedicine and healthcare. Examples include (a) designing medical decision aids using statistical and machine learning models, (b) dynamic modeling and computer simulation to study the biomechanics and control of movement, (c) development of thermodynamic models of dynamic processes at the microscopic and macroscopic scales in biological systems, and (d) image processing techniques for quantitive measurement and interpretation of biomedical images.

[Students must take Electrical Engineering 322C, Data Structures, in the junior year. They must also complete the following four courses:] All students must complete the following four courses:

Biomedical Engineering 341, Engineering Tools for Computational Biology Laboratory
Computer Sciences 323E, Elements of Scientific Computing
Electrical Engineering 360C, Algorithms
Mathematics 340L, Matrices and Matrix Calculations

In addition, students must complete [two electives] six hours of coursework from the following list: at least one of these courses must be in engineering.


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Biomedical Engineering 342, Computational Biomechanics
Biomedical Engineering 345, Graphics and Visualization Laboratory
[Electrical Engineering 360D, Object Oriented Programming]
Electrical Engineering 332, Computer Graphics
Engineering Mechanics 314, Mechanics
Computer Sciences 313E, Elements of Software Design
Computer Sciences 327E, Elements of Databases
Other approved computer sciences courses

SENIOR ENGINEERING ELECTIVES

All students must [take two senior engineering electives for a total of six semester hours.] complete six hours in senior engineering electives. The following may be counted toward this requirement:

An engineering course in any one of the three technical areas. A course may not be counted toward both the technical area requirement and the senior elective requirement.
With the adviser’s consent, any upper-division engineering course. A course may not be counted toward both the technical area requirement and the senior elective requirement.
Biomedical Engineering 361, Biomedical Engineering Industrial and Business Projects
Biomedical Engineering 177, 277, 377, Undergraduate Research Project
One of the following four courses:
  Biomedical Engineering 377P, Clinical Research Internship
Biomedical Engineering 377Q, Clinical Medical Internship
Biomedical Engineering 377R, Research Internship
Biomedical Engineering 377S, Industrial Internship

The clinical research internship program allows students to perform research in laboratories at [either] the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, [or] the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, or an approved program at another medical school; the clinical medical internship program gives students the opportunity to work directly with a single physician or a team of practicing physicians at either institution. In the clinical medical internship, students participate in clinical inpatient rounds, outpatient visits, operating room procedures, and medical grand rounds. This experience gives them direct knowledge of the medical needs that can be addressed by biomedical engineering. In the research internship program, students perform biomedical research with biomedical engineering faculty members at UT Austin and/or the Texas Medical Center in Houston or with faculty members in an approved program at another medical school. The industrial internship program consists of summer internships at partner biomedical companies or government laboratories.


RATIONALE: Editorial changes were approved by the biomedical engineering faculty and have been made for clarification of instrumentation and biomedical image processing.