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3698

DOCUMENTS OF THE GENERAL FACULTY

Following are the minutes of the regular Faculty Council meeting of November 15, 2004.

<signed>

Sue Alexander Greninger, Secretary
The General Faculty

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR FACULTY COUNCIL MEETING OF
November 15, 2004

The third regular meeting of the Faculty Council for the academic year 2004-2005 was held in the Main Building, Room 212, Monday, November 15, 2004, at 2:15 P.M.

ATTENDANCE.

Present: Lawrence D. Abraham, Efraim P. Armendariz, Matthew J. Bailey, Gerard H. Béhague, Pascale R. Bos, Douglas C. Burger, Patricia L. Clubb, Miles L. Crismon, Janet M. Davis, John D. Dollard, Sheldon Ekland-Olson, Lester L. Faigley, Richard R. Flores, Maria Franklin, Wolfgang Frey, Alan W. Friedman, Thomas J. Garza, John C. (Jack) Gilbert, William P. Glade, Michael H. Granof, Sue A. Greninger, Marvin L. Hackert, John J. Hasenbein, Susan S. Heinzelman, James L. Hill, Martha F. Hilley, Archie L. Holmes, James O. Jirsa, Robert C. Koons, Desiderio Kovar, William S. Livingston, Noah S. Lowenstein, Daniell J. MacDonald, Erik D. Malmberg, Glenn Y. Masada, Rachel C. McGinity, Paul A. Navratil, Dean P. Neikirk, Edward W. (Ted) Odell, Patricia C. Ohlendorf, Alba A. Ortiz, Irene Owens, Bruce P. Palka, Anthony J. Petrosino, Theodore E. Pfeifer, Linda E. Reichl, Elizabeth Richmond-Garza, John J. Ruszkiewicz, David W. Springer, Janet Staiger, Michael B. Stoff, Alexandria K. Wettlaufer, Karin G. Wilkins.

Absent: Ricardo C. Ainslie, Dean J. Almy, Jacqueline L. Angel (excused), Peter R. Antoniewicz, Patricia C. Avant, Hans C. Boas (excused), Teresa Graham Brett (excused), Patrick L. Brockett, Cynthia J. Buckley, Brent Chaney, James W. Deitrick (excused), Andrew P. Dillon, James L. Erskine, Larry R. Faulkner (excused), Kenneth Flamm (excused), Jeanne H. Freeland-Graves (excused), Robert Freeman, George W. Gau, Linda L. Golden (excused), Philip A. Guerrero, Donald A. Hale, Roderick P. Hart, Thomas M. Hatfield, Fred M. Heath, Kevin P. Hegarty, Neville Hoad, Joni L. Jones, Manuel J. Justiz (excused), Martin W. Kevorkian, Robert D. King, Nancy P. Kwallek, Richard W. Lariviere, Dominic L. Lasorsa (excused), Desmond F. Lawler (excused), Steven W. Leslie, Roth A. Nelson, Thomas G. Palaima (excused), Marcus G. Pandy, William C. Powers, Mary Ann R. Rankin, Victoria Rodriguez, Juan M. Sanchez, Dolores Sands, M. Michael Sharlot, Patrick N. Staha, Frederick R. Steiner, Ben G. Streetman, Pauline T. Strong, Daniel A. Updegrove, Angela Valenzuela, James W. Vick, N. Bruce Walker, Gwendolyn Webb-Johnson, Barbara W. White, Paul B. Woodruff (excused).

Voting Members:
46
present,
30
absent,
76
total.
Non-Voting Members:
7
present,
25
absent,
32
total.
Total Members:
53
present,
55
absent,
108
total.

3699


I.
REPORT OF THE SECRETARY.

The written report appears in D 3556-3558. There were no questions or comments.
II.
APPROVAL OF MINUTES.

The minutes of the regular Faculty Council meeting of October 20, 2004 (D 3638-3645) were approved by voice vote.
III.
COMMUNICATION WITH THE PRESIDENT.

A. Comments by the President.
None. President Faulkner was in California and unable to attend the meeting.

B. Questions to the President.
Executive Vice President and Provost Sheldon Ekland-Olson presented answers prepared by President Larry Faulkner to four questions that had been submitted prior to the meeting by Professor Thomas Palaima (classics).

1. What are the specific sources of funding for the Hutchinson chair in the law school? What is your opinion as president of naming chairs, buildings, fellowships, anything at UT Austin after politicians who are active and in office? I would also be interested in your personal opinion.

President Faulkner’s reply, as reported by Provost Ekland-Olson, said that leaders of the Law School Foundation raised funds for the Hutchinson chair from private gifts and that the Foundation, rather than the University, held the principal. President Faulkner described regental policies allowing for the naming of endowed chairs, professorships, faculty fellowships, and student scholarships and fellowships but generally not physical facilities and academic programs in honor of current office holders as “reasonable and sensible.”

2. I have recently had occasion to review the history of the relatively recent changes designed to 'improve' faculty family leave policy here at UT. The enactment of, in the event, minor changes that are now known as Modified Instructional Duties Policy (HOP 5.B.1) took nearly five years (January 1999 - November 2003), excluding preliminary discussion in the Faculty Welfare Committee.

This time period included delays of 18 months and 12 months in administrative offices where clear and straightforward wording changes had to be made to draft documents. The end result does not guarantee release time at the birth of a child and leaves prospective parents to negotiate arrangements with chairs, dean and provost, all of whom must approve ad hoc plans. In short, the new policy still puts us at a severe disadvantage in recruiting faculty in competition with other schools with much better policies.

Do you think UT does enough to be family-friendly as an employer?

How do you think the administration can better serve the interests of the Faculty Council in processing future proposals?

President Faulkner’s reply, according to Provost Ekland-Olson, was the administration had consistently supported the modified instructional duties policy. The delay in implementation resulted primarily from legal inconsistencies in the original legislation with state law identified by the UT System Office and legal council. These legal and accountability issues required that the proposed policy be revised and circulated a second time through the UT legislative process. As evidence of UT’s interest in employees, President Faulkner cited

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  improvements in educational benefits for employees, maintenance of full health benefits for graduate assistants, and expansion of the childcare center.

In response to the president’s request for comment, Vice President for Employee and Campus Services Pat Clubb listed several benefits, including flexible work hours, free bus transportation, sick leave pool, educational classes, and special events for low-paid workers, emergency loans, and summer camps for children. Associate Vice President for Human Resources Kyle Cavanaugh added that UT goes beyond what is mandated by the Family Medical Leave Act, providing 12 weeks of leave for certain health conditions for those who do not meet the federal requirements regarding duration of employment for benefit eligibility. He also mentioned the availability of the following for employees: salary supplement for dependent health insurance, extended benefits in disability insurance programs, Employee Assistance Program, and time off for personal matters, such as parent-teacher conferences.

Provost Ekland-Olson reported that he thought both the modified alternate duties and the spousal hiring policies were working well. In response to Professor Martha Hilley’s (music) question as to whether the modified instructional duties policy was a regular part of the training of departmental chairs, Provost Ekland-Olson said the topic did come up but that it was “not part of the script.” He said memoranda were sent out regarding the policy, but that they might not be effective. He agreed to see that the policy was included in the training of chairs and to work toward simplification of the process; however, he said it was also important that legal issues were covered and understood.

Professor Alan Friedman (English) said Professor Palaima’s issues regarding length of time delay in policy implementation, emergence of a different policy outcome than recommended, and necessity for a faculty member to negotiate for leave rather than to automatically receive it under certain circumstances were matters of concern. He also emphasized the importance of Professor Palaima’s question about why the Office of General Counsel and the Office of Legal Affairs could not be more proactive in assisting faculty to come up with a mutually satisfactory solution to a problem rather than saying legal issues prevented anything from being done. Provost Ekland-Olson responded that the advice had been heard, but the policy issues involving modified alternate duties had been complex and took time to resolve.

Vice President for Legal Affairs Patricia Ohlendorf said the original legislation required a change in state law, and the administration had pursued a possible change during two legislative sessions. Although the final policy was a compromise and did not fully meet the expectations of everyone, she said she thought her office had been proactive on the issue.

3. What is the status of your ten-year plan to hire 30 new faculty members per year? It was suspended one year, but is it back on now? What does it mean to do this when in some colleges’ replacement hiring for faculty who have left are effectively frozen in many departments? Who is being hired and what are the criteria?

According to President Faulkner’s reply, as reported by Provost Ekland-Olson, the UT faculty was 109 FTEs larger in 2003 than in 1999-2000. Although data for fall 2004 were not yet complete, President Faulkner expected another 30 members or so to be added, resulting in an increase of approximately120 new faculty positions over the five-year period since the initiative began. During early rounds, priority was given to core departments in the Colleges of Natural Sciences and Liberal Arts where the student-to-faculty ratios were particularly high. Resources were later directed toward innovative curricular initiatives within a college, such as the major in biomedical engineering, and to cluster hires for curricular innovations that cross college boundaries, such as environmental studies, the Center for American Music, South Asia Studies, and Latin American Studies. The first four rounds were allocated as follows: liberal arts, 30; natural sciences, 25; engineering, 18; communications, 13; fine arts, 9; and other, 18 (architecture, nursing, business school, social work, education, high school, and various centers). According to Provost Ekland-Olson seven positions were unallocated at

3701


 
 
  the time these numbers were generated, but all had since been allocated. The provost had used his internal resources to fund an additional 14-17 positions beyond the original faculty expansion initiative.

Professor Gerard Behague (music) said he was concerned about the criteria used for new positions and the need for appropriate faculty consultation involving program expansion. He referenced a case involving Latin American Studies and the School of Music. Provost Ekland-Olson said he was not familiar with the specific case; he added that departments could reject specific positions or ask for renegotiation or redirection of funds.

4. What was the total budget for the Commission of 125, including travel and related expenses (if any) for commission meetings (if any) and for printing and distribution of the deluxe version of the report? What was the source of funding for these things?

President Faulkner’s reply was that the Commission of 125 involved 218 members and 150 faculty and staff members over a two-year period that cost UT Austin approximately $693,000, including $93,000 in printing costs for 7,500 standard and 350 hard-cover reports. The hard-cover reports were gifts to commission members; although many were hand delivered, costs for those that were shipped ran about $5 per copy. Funding for UT’s share of the commission budget came from the Larry R. Faulkner President’s Excellence Fund, President’s Associate Funds, and other discretionary funds. Because commission members paid their own travel, lodging, meals, and incidental expenses, President Faulkner said it was likely that UT’s share was less than the combined total of personal expenses born by commission members. He said the past had shown that such initiatives had been beneficial to the University, e.g., 572 faculty endowments created by the Centennial Commission that included the Raymond Dixon Centennial Professorship #2 held by Professor Palaima.

Professor Michael Granof (accounting) said that he thought the naming of professorships, statues, buildings, etc. was a serious issue that deserved increased faculty involvement. When asked if he would consider increasing faculty involvement in these matters, Provost Ekland-Olson recommended that the suggestion be submitted to President Faulkner.
IV.
REPORT OF THE CHAIR.

Chair Linda Reichl (physics) reported that there were approximately 140 nominations received for membership on the Task Force on Curriculum Reform. She said President Faulkner wanted the core curriculum committee named by the end of the semester.

Chair Reichl said she had attended a meeting of the Faculty Grievance Committee with administrators the previous week and was pleased to report that progress was being made toward getting differences resolved. Professor Sue Heinzelman (English), chair of the Faculty Grievance Committee, confirmed that the discussions at the recent meeting had been productive. She said she thought the grievance process could be reinstated “fairly soon.” Provost Ekland-Olson concurred. Professor Heinzelman said that gaining approval from the administration on the pending legislation about disciplining and discovery would be important in reinstituting the process. Chair Reichl said work was underway to get the grievance process information updated in the Handbook of Operating Procedures (HOP).
V.
REPORT OF THE CHAIR ELECT.

Chair Elect Alba Ortiz (special education) passed out information sheets that included an overview of the upcoming joint meeting with the Texas A&M Faculty Senate and requested input from Council members regarding topics and speakers. The meeting will be at the UT Alumni Center on March 28 from 11:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. and will feature a soup, salad, and potato bar luncheon.
VI.
UNFINISHED BUSINESS — None.

3702


VII.
REPORTS OF THE GENERAL FACULTY, COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS, AND COMMITTEES.

A. Report from the Intercollegiate Athletics Council for Men.

Professor David Fowler (civil engineering), chair of the Intercollegiate Athletics Council for Men, reported on the role, composition, and membership of the council. He said the council is advisory and can make recommendations regarding admissions standards and financial aid provisions for student athletes within NCAA guidelines. He said that a subcommittee of the council generally meets with the academic counselors each semester to review the progress of student athletes; he said a subcommittee rather than the full council must perform this task due to open records rules. Other functions of the council include reviewing the budget, competition schedules, and compliance issues involving the NCAA.

When Professor Jack Gilbert (chemistry and biochemistry) asked if the coaches were involved along with the advisors in the academic subcommittee meetings, Professor Fowler said that had not occurred but had been discussed as a possibility for the future. Professor Gilbert said he thought that would be a beneficial development and then asked why an advisory group, such as an athletics council, was subject to open meeting regulations. Vice President Ohlendorf said the ruling occurred in the 1970s when the council functioned differently and the UT System was involved with athletic matters. She said the University was hoping to get a ruling from the Texas Attorney General’s office this year that would remove this restriction. If this change were to occur, she said that parts of the meetings would still be open to anyone wanting to attend, including the media. However, she said council members needed to be free to express their opinions on issues and that members might not feel free to do so in open meetings. In addition, she said items that require future regental approval can sometimes be problematic if members of the Board of Regents read or hear about them first through the media before hearing about them at their own meetings.

B. Report from the Intercollegiate Athletics Council for Women.

Professor Linda Ferreira-Buckley (English), chair of the Intercollegiate Athletics Council for Women, reported that every year members of the council meet with the academic counselors and the respective coaches to review each individual student athlete’s progress. The academic subcommittee is comprised of three of the four faculty members on the council. A detailed handout (Appendix A) summarizing graduation rates, GPAs, and other academic data for the overall program and by team was distributed. The cumulative mean GPA of all female athletes at the end of fall 2003 was 3.097 and the semester GPA was 3.068. At the end of spring 2004, the comparable GPAs were 3.123 and 3.131, respectively. The graduation rate of freshmen entering in 1997 was 74%, and the graduation rate of students who exhausted their eligibility was 96%. To become familiar with the lives of student athletes, council members plan to attend some student council meetings and visit their study halls this year.

When Professor Jack Gilbert asked if there might no longer be a separate department of Intercollegiate Athletics for Women in the future, Professor Ferreira-Buckley said that some components of both the men’s and women’s programs, such as the budget, were combined. She said there had been discussion in the past that other components might be combined, including the academic subcommittees. Although she thought it could be a good idea to hold joint meetings where ideas could be shared, she preferred to keep the academic subcommittees separate for the two programs. When asked by Chair Reichl if she thought the different approaches of the two councils toward monitoring academic performance mattered, Professor Ferreira-Buckley said that she thought the main difference was participation by the coaches and that their participation provided increased transparency. She spoke positively about the men’s program.

3703


 
C. Comments from the Intercollegiate Athletics for Men Department.

Brian Davis, assistant athletics director for academic services, Intercollegiate Athletics for Men, distributed a handout (Appendix B) reporting that the cumulative mean GPA of all male athletes at the end of fall 2003 was 2.68 and the semester GPA was 2.56. At the end of spring 2004, the comparable GPAs were 2.67 and 2.63, respectively. The graduation rate of freshmen entering in 1997 was 40%, and the graduation rate of students who exhausted their eligibility was 78%. Regarding the highly publicized 27% graduation rate in football, Mr. Davis explained that student transfers resulting from a coaching change had adversely impacted the rate. He highlighted students who had been successful. Professor Janet Staiger (radio, television, film) asked Mr. Davis if he could provide a detailed breakdown regarding student performance, e.g., percentage of those falling below a 2.0 GPA, etc. She also said it would be helpful to see GPAs by sport in a similar manner to that presented about the female athletes.

Deloss Dodds, director, Intercollegiate Athletics for Men, said the 240 full-time athletics department staff members were committed to providing the best support and facilities for the 670 student athletes who participated in 20 different sports at UT Austin. He said the $80 million UT athletic department budget is the second largest in the nation, with $60 some million allocated for athletics and $13 million for the Erwin Center. Fundraising efforts raise about $18 million a year. During the last five years, approximately $130 million has been spent on construction and renovation projects. Mr. Dodds reported that many of the administrative functions and day-to-day activities of the men’s and women’s programs had been combined. He said that academic support for the athletes is “paramount.” Approximately $1.6 million is spent per year on student services, with about $425,000 of that for tutoring and mentoring. There are 14 fulltime academic counselors with most of the tutoring and mentoring services being provided by employees who are UT students. Scholarships for the program total about $6.25 million each year.

When asked by Professor Gilbert his opinion regarding the value of having regental appointments on the athletics council by Professor Gilbert, Mr. Dodds responded that it depended on the individuals who were appointed. He then said he thought the current appointees brought a business approach and balance to the council and benefited the University. He said he was unaware that regental appointments were uncommon in the Big 12 and other UT System schools as had been indicated by Professor Gilbert. When asked by Professor Gilbert his opinions regarding the practice of providing free athletic tickets to council members, Mr. Dodds said he thought the long-standing practice allowed members to attend events regardless of their cost and to interact with student athletes. When Professor Gilbert expressed his concern that this practice might pose a potential conflict of interest for athletic council members, Mr. Dodds said he did not vote on the question and would defer the issue to the chair of the Men’s Athletic Council.

Both Professors Sue Greninger (human ecology) and Larry Abraham (kinesiology and health education; curriculum and instruction) asked if increased detail regarding student outcomes could be made available to the Faculty Council to help members understand what was happening to the students after they leave the program and the complexity of the issues regarding graduation rates and other outcomes. Mr. Dodds said his department was willing to share the information that it had available. He said the NCAA was addressing these issues by developing a new point system to evaluate program outcomes. When asked by Professor Michael Stroff (history) if the men’s athletic program could follow the same commendable format that had been used in presenting information about the women’s program at the current Faculty Council meeting, Mr. Dodds said that the men’s program would be glad to do so.


3704


 
D. Comments from the Intercollegiate Athletics for Women Department.

Christine Plonsky, director, Intercollegiate Athletics for Women, said that competitiveness and academics were both of importance to the women’s athletic program. She said data collected under two new NCAA rules, the Academic Progress Rate (APR) and the Graduation Success Rate (GSR), would be used to assess the performance of all athletic programs in the future. The APR provides a current picture of academic performance and progress of students receiving financial aid by team; teams will be assessed substantial penalties if their performance does not meet an established filter, e.g., loss of scholarships, inability to compete in championship games, etc. Regarding the GSR, the six-year window will be maintained but transfers to other institutions or early exits to play professional sports will no longer count against institutions. She said she thought accountability for academic, as well as athletic performance, would be enhanced as a result of these new NCAA regulations and that UT Austin was an active participant in encouraging these changes.

Professor Lester Faigley (English, rhetoric and composition) asked if the new regulations would address abuses such as those revealed recently at Ohio State involving bogus or quasi-legitimate courses. Ms. Plonsky said she thought so. She said that the changes, especially the requirement mandating 40% completion of a degree program by junior year, would make a difference. She said student athletes with numerous junior college hours that do not count toward a legitimate degree program at a major university would face difficulty meeting this requirement when trying to transfer. She said she was not aware of any “fake” courses at UT Austin. Ms. Plonsky also reported that Amy Folan, UT’s new associate athletics director for compliance, is actively reviewing budgets and giving educational sessions for both coaches and students in an effort to prevent compliance problems and improve accountability.

E. Report from the Educational Policy Committee on Online Course Retention (D 3636).

Professor Archie Holmes (electrical and computer engineering and committee chair) reported that the Division of Instructional Innovation and Assessment (DIIA) had asked the committee to review the new policy on online course retention. He said that the document distributed to the council appeared in the form of legislation, but it was informational and was not an action item. The new policy is that online course material posted on Blackboard will be archived after two years; however, the material will not be deleted.

VIII.
NEW BUSINESS.

A. Preliminary discussion of a motion to change the title and function of the Responsibilities, Rights, and Welfare of TAs and AIs Committee (C-12 committee) (D 3637).

Professor David Bogard (mechanical engineering and committee chair) reported that the committee had in the last several years reviewed general issues that pertained to all graduate student employees, including graduate research assistants (GRAs). He said the only issue was if a committee of the Graduate Assembly would be more appropriate than his committee to handle issues pertaining to GRAs. Professor Bogard said he had talked with the administrative committee of the Graduate Assembly, but it did not appear that an appropriate committee existed in that legislative body to handle issues pertaining to GRAs.

Professor Larry Abraham, chair of the Committee on Committees, reported that his committee had been asked to review the proposal under discussion, and the committee supported the proposed changes to the Responsibilities, Rights, and Welfare of TAs and AIs Committee. Past Chair Marvin Hackert (chemistry and biochemistry) said he supported the general welfare and informational issues provided by the proposed legislation, but he said caution should be taken not to impose rules that would interfere with the employer-employee relationships between principal

3705


 
  investigators and GRAs. Paul Navratil (Graduate Student Assembly) said the assembly favored the proposal and was pleased that the Faculty Council had responded to the assembly’s resolution requesting consideration of the issue. Professor Alan Friedman (English) said he had no objection to the proposed changes but wanted to know if grievances regarding AIs and TAs fell under the jurisdiction of the Responsibilities, Rights, and Welfare of TAs and AIs Committee or the Faculty Grievance Committee. Professor Janet Staiger responded that, although reasons for a policy change might well exist, HOP section 4.03 placed grievances regarding AIs and TAs under the Faculty Grievance Committee. Eric Malmberg (Graduate Student Assembly) said HOP section 5 also deals with grievances regarding graduate students so further review of this issue would be useful. Professor John Dollard (mathematics) said, during his chairmanship of the Responsibilities, Rights, and Welfare of TAs and AIs Committee for the past four years, there had been a general recognition that certain issues were relevant to all graduate students. He felt the committee could distinguish when the employment situation for the two groups of graduate student employees differed. Professor Staiger said that TAs and AIs were faculty appointments, but she was not sure if this were true regarding GRAs. Chair Reichl said this was an issue that needed more discussion at the next meeting.
IX.
ANNOUNCEMENTS AND COMMENTS — None.
X.
QUESTIONS TO THE CHAIR — None.
XI.
ADJOURNMENT.
Adjourned at 3:55 p.m.

 

Distributed through the Faculty Council Web site on January 20, 2005. Copies are available on request from the Office of the General Faculty, FAC 22, F9500.


3706
return

APPENDIX A
 
Report to the Faculty Council
Monday, November 15, 2004
Intercollegiate Athletics for Women

Academic Summary for 2003-2004

Fall 2003

  • Cumulative GPA: 3.097
  • Semester GPA: 3.068
  • 58% with Cumulative GPA of 3.0 or Better
  • 57% with Semester GPA of 3.0 or Better
  • 2% on Scholastic Probation

Spring 2004

  • Cumulative GPA: 3.123
  • Semester GPA: 3.131
  • 60% with Cumulative GPA of 3.0 or Better
  • 66% with Semester GPA of 3.0 or Better
  • 1.45% on Scholastic Probation

Graduation Rates (1997 Cohort)

  • 74% of IAW Student-Athletes Graduated from The University of Texas
  • 96% of IAW Student-Athletes who Exhausted their Eligibility Graduated from The University of Texas

Grades and SAT Scores by Sport

Basketball                       

SP ’99

F ’99

SP ’00

F ’00

SP ’01

F ’01

SP ’02

F ’02

SP ’03

F ’03

SP ’04

Cum. Mean

2.849

2.824

2.706

2.830

2.84

2.71

2.70

2.71

2.80

2.78

2.763

Sem. Mean

2.902

2.738

2.587

2.883

2.93

2.59

2.58

2.70

2.75

2.66

2.677

Cum. Med.

2.888

2.885

2.776

2.850

2.92

2.85

2.80

2.83

2.87

2.8

2.79

Sem. Med.

3.000

3.1

2.75

2.923

3.000

2.60

2.75

2.57

2.60

2.69

2.72

SAT Mean

966

995

985

1006

995

937

941

935

935

913

913

Squad Size

18

14

13

16

16

14

14

15

15

13

13

Golf           

SP ’99

F ’99

SP ’00

F ’00

SP ’01

F ’01

SP ’02

F ’02

SP ’03

F ’03

SP ’04

Cum. Mean

3.345

3.147

3.189

3.110

3.131

3.08

3.04

3.17

3.10

3.01

3.02

Sem. Mean

3.500

2.994

3.255

3.171

3.022

2.93

2.95

3.03

2.97

2.77

3.0

Cum. Med.

3.387

3.343

3.310

3.100

3.165

3.17

3.095

3.21

3.19

3.06

3.12

Sem. Med.

3.500

3.000

3.0

3.000

3.25

3.1

2.87

3.00

3.00

2.75

3.20

SAT Mean

1095

1144

1138

1114

1114

1080

1080

1032

1032

986

986

Squad Size

9

9

10

10

10

10

10

8

8

7

7



3707


Rowing (* Includes novice)

SP ’99

F ’99

SP ’00

F ’00

SP ’01

F ’01

SP ’02

F ’02

SP ’03

F ’03

SP ’04

Cum. Mean

3.278

2.932

2.944

2.770

3.01

3.02

3.16

3.25

3.22

3.26

3.12

Sem. Mean

3.294

2.898

2.982

2.700

2.96

3.10

3.21

3.25

3.27

3.3

3.04

Cum. Med.

3.399

2.844

2.805

2.750

2.921

2.77

3.25

3.20

3.26

3.22

3.20

Sem. Med.

3.287

3.000

3.038

3.000

3.000

3.04

3.08

3.44

3.33

3.25

3.25

SAT Mean

1200

1177

1163

1117

1152

1143

1167

1171

1183

1173

1208

Squad Size

18

24

26

25

53*

30

58*

32

67*

35

59*

Soccer

SP ’99

F ’99

SP ’00

F ’00

SP ’01

F ’01

SP ’02

F ’02

SP ’03

F ’03

SP ’04

Cum. Mean

2.928

2.786

2.859

2.704

2.909

2.92

2.99

3.03

3.01

3.13

3.207

Sem. Mean

2.858

2.754

2.943

2.740

3.044

2.89

3.19

3.00

3.02

3.28

3.359

Cum. Med.

2.908

2.796

2.943

2.680

2.848

2.92

2.98

3.08

3.12

3.2

3.22

Sem. Med.

3.000

2.875

3.076

2.572

3.0

3.0

3.16

3.20

3.20

3.25

3.33

SAT Mean

1047

1084

1083

1056

1056

1066

1066

1072

1079

1070

1076

Squad Size

18

18

18

22

20

26

26

29

29

27

25

Softball      

SP ’99

F ’99

SP ’00

F ’00

SP ’01

F ’01

SP ’02

F ’02

SP ’03

F ’03

SP ’04

Cum. Mean

3.204

3.178

3.152

2.810

2.907

3.05

2.99

3.01

3.01

2.87

2.899

Sem. Mean

3.237

3.206

3.324

2.754

2.818

3.22

2.84

3.05

3.04

2.83

3.049

Cum. Med.

3.258

3

3.075

2.950

2.841

3.05

3.10

3.00

3.15

2.68

2.88

Sem. Med.

3.500

3.2

3.500

2.846

2.834

3.25

2.75

3.00

3.25

2.78

3.14

SAT Mean

1077

1084

1073

1034

1021

1054

1054

1042

1042

1021

1023

Squad Size

21

18

18

19

18

17

17

17

17

16

15

Swimming & Diving

SP ’99

F ’99

SP ’00

F ’00

SP ’01

F ’01

SP ’02

F ’02

SP ’03

F ’03

SP ’04

Cum. Mean

3.065

2.975

3.010

3.020

3.132

3.18

3.22

3.04

3.13

3.21

3.217

Sem. Mean

3.078

2.966

2.976

2.998

3.078

3.26

3.21

3.04

3.08

3.13

3.224

Cum. Med.

3.050

3.071

3.052

3.020

3.100

3.15

3.26

3.00

3.20

3.22

3.23

Sem. Med.

3.250

3.071

3.200

2.967

3.312

3.36

3.22

3.13

3.25

3.12

3.36

SAT Mean

1154

1043

1146

1140

1153

1156

1156

1138

1124

1066

1089

Squad Size

30

31

28

26

28

34

30

31

29

32

33

Tennis   

SP ’99

F ’99

SP ’00

F ’00

SP ’01

F ’01

SP ’02

F ’02

SP ’03

F ’03

SP ’04

Cum. Mean

3.203

3.550

3.470

3.390

3.468

3.43

3.46

3.12

3.32

3.16

3.2

Sem. Mean

3.206

3.663

3.598

3.442

3.248

3.31

3.40

3.05

3.54

2.96

3.186

Cum. Med.

3.070

3.700

3.750

3.770

3.761

3.75

3.68

3.00

3.38

3.28

3.20

Sem. Med.

3.450

3.700

3.811

3.643

3.375

3.77

3.62

3.00

3.60

2.97

3.0

SAT Mean

1076

1046

1033

1065

1065

1100

1100

1033

1065

1056

1056

Squad Size

12

7

8

8

8

8

8

10

9

8

8



3708


 Track & Field/Cross Country

SP ’99

F ’99

SP ’00

F ’00

SP ’01

F ’01

SP ’02

F ’02

SP ’03

F ’03

SP ’04

Cum. Mean

2.623

2.694

2.786

2.990

2.937

3.05

3.11

3.01

3.07

3.08

3.119

Sem. Mean

2.606

2.652

2.811

3.045

2.907

3.02

3.03

2.95

3.03

3.07

3.183

Cum. Med.

2.625

2.515

2.710

3.000

2.871

3.0

3.16

3.27

3.10

3.27

3.299

Sem. Med.

2.750

2.545

3.0

3.100

2.806

3.07

2.93

3.16

3.00

3.25

3.25

SAT Mean

1061

988

1045

1006

1010

1034

1034

1035

1030

1051

1060

Squad Size

29

25

29

24

26

25

22

30

30

40

35

Volleyball   

SP ’99

F ’99

SP ’00

F ’00

SP ’01

F ’01

SP ’02

F ’02

SP ’03

F ’03

SP ’04

Cum. Mean

3.260

3.320

3.147

3.100

3.125

3.18

2.97

2.94

3.00

2.98

3.165

Sem. Mean

3.165

3.321

2.949

3.020

2.963

3.17

2.85

2.88

2.93

2.62

3.048

Cum. Med.

3.416

3.436

3.126

3.045

3.048

3.20

3.0

2.98

2.97

2.85

2.978

Sem. Med.

3.250

3.462

3.100

2.875

3.200

3.23

2.92

3.10

3.07

2.75

3.379

SAT Mean

1079

1062

1105

1089

1094

1115

1057

1064

1068

1037

1018

Squad Size

10

15

10

16

15

14

10

12

9

11

12



3709
return

APPENDIX B

Report to the Faculty Council
Monday, November 15, 2004
Intercollegiate Athletics for Men



Academic Summary

Fall 2003

  • Cumulative GPA: 2.68

  • Semester GPA: 2.56
  • 83 students with a 3.0 or above for the semester
  • 9 students with a 4.0
Spring 2004

  • Cumulative GPA: 2.67
  • Semester GPA: 2.63
  • 114 students with a 3.0 or above for the semester
  • 13 students with a 4.0

Graduation Rates (1997 cohort)

  • 40% of freshmen entering in 1997 graduated from The University of Texas
  • 78% of students who exhausted their eligibility graduated from The University of Texas

Academic Highlights

  • Tennis had a team high gpa of 3.29 for Fall ‘03

  • Golf had a team high gpa of 3.08 for the Spring ‘04

  • Football student-athletes Brett Robin and Kalen Thornton named as District 6 Academic All-Americans

  • Brett Robin awarded a $7,000 post graduate scholarship by the Big XII Conference