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C-7
Library Committee


This has been a year of change and learning for the Library Committee and for the libraries at the University (the General Libraries was renamed University of Texas Libraries).

1. Standing Committee Changes
At the beginning of the 2004-05 academic year, the name of this committee, its function statement, and its composition statement were as they had been for many years:

  C-7 Library Committee

FUNCTION: To be so well informed concerning the functions of the Library that it can assist in developing operational procedures; to assist in development of both personnel and fiscal policies and procedures; to advise the Faculty Council and the president concerning the direction and growth of the Library; to advise the president in the event it becomes necessary to appoint a new librarian.

COMPOSITION: At least eight members of the General Faculty and seven students. Student members shall be appointed by the president in the fall from panels of names submitted by the appropriate student committees and shall include two representatives from Student Government, three from the Cabinet of College Councils, and two from the Graduate Student Assembly. In addition, every year the chair of the Faculty Council shall appoint two members of the Faculty Council for one-year terms as members of the committee. The committee shall elect its own chair and vice chair, who shall be members of the General Faculty. The director of General Libraries shall serve as administrative adviser without vote. Heads of other administrative units on campus that include library programs and services shall be invited to provide comment and information as the need arises.


At the end of the 2004-05 academic year, upon the recommendation of the Library Committee chair to the Committee on Committees, the name of this committee, its function statement, and it composition statement (approved by the Faculty Council, pending President Larry R. Faulkner's final approval) are:

  C-7 University of Texas Libraries Committee

FUNCTION: To become well informed concerning the functions of the University of Texas Libraries. To assist in developing operational procedures; to advise the librarian, the Faculty Council and the president concerning the direction and growth of the University of Texas Libraries; to advise the president in the event it becomes necessary to appoint a new librarian.

COMPOSITION: At least eight members of the General Faculty, three staff members, and seven students. Staff members shall be appointed by the president from panels of names submitted by the Staff Council and shall include two research staff representatives. Student members shall be appointed by the president in the fall from panels of names submitted by the appropriate student committees and shall include two representatives from Student Government, three from the Cabinet of College Councils, and two from the Graduate Student Assembly. In addition, every year the chair of the Faculty Council shall appoint two members of the Faculty Council for one-year terms as members of the committee. The committee shall elect its own chair and vice chair, who shall be members of the General Faculty. The director of the University of Texas Libraries shall serve as administrative adviser without vote. Heads of other administrative units on campus that include library programs and services shall be invited to provide comment and information as the need arises.

2. Committee Meetings and Other Activities

The year of learning for Library Committee members and for University of Texas Libraries administrators is summarized in the following information about meetings and tours.

The following summarizes salient points that were covered in meetings of the Library Committee during the 2004-2005 academic year. Minutes for each meeting are posted at the University Library Committee Web site <http://www.lib.utexas.edu/vprovost/meetings/ulc_index.html>, and some of the minutes contain links to PowerPoint files and other documents

September 7 Meeting (PCL 3.204)
Professor Thomas G. Palaima convened the meeting and Professor Kenneth M. Ralls was elected chair. The chair distributed various handouts: copies of the FUNCTION and COMPOSITION of the Library Committee, as given in the Faculty Council Web page; past committee annual reports and other reports to the Faculty Council; and a list of items that he would like to see considered at future committee meetings. (See the minutes posted on the University Library Committee Web site for a complete list.) Electronic versions were sent to Dr. John M. Slatin, who subsequently informed the chair that he was able to access the electronic documents. Additional handouts were distributed at the second meeting .

September 14 Meeting (PCL 3.204)
The chair distributed additional handouts (see the minutes posted on the University Library Committee Web site for a complete list).

Dr. Fred Heath, vice provost and director, University of Texas Libraries, gave an overview of University of Texas Libraries—rankings relative to other members of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL), expenditures and budget, and need for an integrated library system (ILS). One goal is to add $5M per year to University of Texas Libraries base budget for the next four years, in order to cover the structural deficit, materials inflation, staffing needs, IT lifecycle (e.g., workstation replacement), program enhancements, and an Integrated Library System. Dr. Heath's PowerPoint presentation is accessible through the University Library Committee Web site.

WE ARE THE ONLY MAJOR RESEARCH LIBRARY IN THE USA AND CANADA THAT DOES NOT HAVE AN INTEGRATED LIBRARY SYSTEM. A new ILS will cost about $4M. Of this, $3.5M needs to come from the University (and there will be recurring maintenance costs). Current computer systems used by University of Texas Libraries are limited in capability, do not "talk" to each other, and are outmoded. The current computer hardware used consists of several servers.

October 8 Meeting (PCL 3.204)
Mark McFarland, associate director for digital initiatives, University of Texas Libraries, presented reasons why an integrated library system is needed, the scope and process for such a purchase, what a prospective ILS does for users, and how the acquisition of an ILS would affect the library's services and operations. He repeated the presentation on October 26 for those who missed the October 8 meeting. Selected points in the presentation follow.

What is an Integrated Library System?
1. An automated information management system in which the functional applications (modules) share a common database
2. Ideally there is minimal or no duplication of bibliographic information in a truly integrated system

Why we need an ILS
1. Improve service for faculty, students, staff
2. Improve efficiency with respect to process workflow
3. So that we can deploy modern systems that comply with important standards that facilitate access to library resources
4. ALL of our peers have purchased modern systems and we are unable to share information/resources as efficiently as we should be
5. Increase our chances of finding staff who have the skills to operate and maintain our mission critical systems

With new ILS
1. Modules designed and written to work with common database
2. Software will run on common hardware platform—gain efficiencies in administration of hardware and software
3. Can take advantage of new technology—linking software and federated research
4. Better reporting tools for managing money and collections

Limitations of current systems
1. At least 6 separate databases
2. At least 4 separate hardware platforms
3. At least 4 Operating Systems
4. Unable to use important technology that has been emerging for the past 5-10 years

What our current system isn't
1. It is not compliant with dozens of basic and emerging NISO standards for automated library systems
2. It is not easily interoperable with course management software (e.g., Blackboard)
3. It is not readily interoperable with Institutional Repository technology

Electronic Resources
1. None of our systems currently handle bibliographic information for e-books and e-journals effectively
2. In many cases we have 4 sets of bibliographic data for the same title – this level of duplication makes it impossible to efficiently manage our materials

To sum it up
1. We will get more functionality
2. Be able to take advantage of new technologies
3. Need interoperability locally and with our peers
4. We believe this will bring down maintenance costs
5. This will enable us to achieve efficiencies within the systems themselves that will result in better service for our users

Subsequent to the meeting, Mark McFarland prepared a "Glossary of terms used in the ILS presentation."

October 29-November 2
"Behind-the-scenes" tours of Perry-Castañeda Library were taken by small groups of Library Committee members. These thirty minute tours gave an overview of cataloging, acquisitions, preservation, and digital library services.

This must become a required event for University of Texas Libraries Committee members early in the fall semester each year

November 15 Meeting (PCL 3.204)
Sue Phillips, executive associate director, University of Texas Libraries, provided a demonstration on the utility of an integrated library system for users.

She started with a look at the UT Libraries Web site, asking: (1) How easy is it for an undergraduate to use the site? (2) Does the student know where to start to find resources? (3) Is there a place to store links to information that they find?

She then provided a look at the research port at the University of Maryland, showing: (1) it offers a quick search option (just enter search terms and go); (2) it will search a set of selected resources (databases, catalogs, etc) with one click; (3) its search process puts up a status page indicating results of the search in each database, etc. (successful link, connection failure, number of results); and (4) its users can save an article to disk, send it via e-mail, or add it to their personalized research port. Users can create their own personalized research port that lists sets of databases and e-journals that they regularly search, and stores citations and links to information that they find through their Port.

Dennis Dillon, associate director for research services, University of Texas Libraries, distributed a handout that summarized the benefits of an integrated library system for University of Texas Libraries and the negative consequences of not acquiring an ILS. The information is summarized in the following.

An Integrated Library System will allow the library (taken from Dennis Dillon’s handout): (1) to provide faculty and students with a larger universe of scholarly information; (2) to provide faculty and students with more control over that information; (3) to deliver information in more sophisticated ways; (4) to simplify your life and to save you time; (5) to work more easily with publishers, universities, and database suppliers; and (6) to achieve operating efficiencies. (More detail is provided on the actual handout.) He also noted that a modern integrated library system would help with new digital library activities as well as traditional library activities. Moreover it will help library staff in a number of ways.

If the library does not purchase a new Integrated Library System, faculty and students (continued from Dennis Dillon’s handout): (1) will not have access to the information tools available to the rest of higher education; (2) will have access to a smaller universe of information; (3) will spend more time doing research; (4) will use search technology that misses research material and is less effective than at peer institutions; (5) will have access to fewer e-journals; (6) will spend more time tracking down printed journals; (7) will not be competitive with their peers at other institutions who have access to modern information systems; (8) will find an increasing amount of frustrating errors in the existing library system; and (9) will see a reduction in library services. (As before, more detail is provided in the actual, attached handout.)

The issue of students using Google searches was discussed.

Prior to Sue Phillips's presentation, Chair Kenneth M. Ralls had distributed a business card created by the staff of the McKinney Engineering Library. The reverse of this card reads:

Reference Librarians can help with
Efficient information gathering
Industry standards (ASTM, IEEE, etc.)
Patents
Finding specific information
References and citations
WHEN GOOGLING ISN'T ENOUGH


December 14 Meeting (DFA 4.104)
This meeting was in the Fine Arts Library in Doty Fine Arts Building.
This was the first time ever that a Library Committee meeting was held at a branch library.

Laura Schwartz, head librarian, Fine Arts Library, gave a PowerPoint presentation titled "The Future of the Fine Arts Library: a collaborative exploration." The presentation included extensive data about the Fine Arts Library and culminated with future plans for the Fine Arts Library integrated learning environment that is being developed in cooperation with the College of Fine Arts. Selected points are given below.

The Doty Fine Arts Building will be…
The student gathering center on the east side of campus
An environment for studying, learning, and teaching
Nourishment for the brain and stomach

How do we get there???
Transformation of the Fine Arts Library space into a learning center environment
Gathering data from our constituents
Site visits to other libraries and learning spaces

Transformation of the basement space into a facility with refreshments and a comfortable and inviting place to gather

Transformation from Library to Learning Center
Seminar Rooms
Media Center
Investigating new technologies
Writing Center
Facilities/Furniture

Ms. Schwartz discussed the present state and future plans for seminar rooms, media center, investigating new technologies, writing center, and facilities/furniture. Funding for upgrading the technology in the library’s seminar rooms (LCD projectors, smart lecterns, etc.) and building a media center (an integration of the library and the Fines Arts computer lab) comes mainly from the College of Fine Arts.

Jim Kerkhoff, assistant dean, College of Fine Arts, spoke in strong support of the collaboration between the College and the Fine Arts Library. Tours of the Fine Arts Library were given.

January 25 Meeting (MAI 220)

This meeting was held at the Life Science Library in the Main Building.

Nancy Elder, head librarian, Life Science Library, provided an overview of EndNote software. She regularly gives EndNote tutorials for faculty and students. EndNote is database software used to create and output bibliographic references and includes templates for more than forty types of materials. EndNote is the most heavily used bibliographic program on campus. EndNote can output its information in 1,200 bibliographic styles, styles can be modified as needed, and a database may contain 100,000 records.

UT Press director Joanna Hitchcock and Dennis Dillon spoke to the committee regarding the recent symposium on publishing and the academy, which was held on campus. A very lively general discussion followed. The Library Committee chair recommended covering the topics of scholarly publishing and open access again at a committee meeting next year. A brief tour of the Life Science Library was given.

February 21 Meeting (ECJ 1.300)
This meeting was in the Alec Room of the engineering library in Cockrell Hall.

Chair Kenneth M. Ralls introduced Ben Streetman, dean, College of Engineering, who noted that research costing in excess of $100 million annually is being done in the College of Engineering and that the engineering library is at the heart of research and teaching in the college and is important to undergraduates, graduate students, faculty and other researchers. He emphasized that students, faculty and other researchers rely on professional, reference librarians to help get their work done and to know what their research is all about. He stated that he is intrigued with the notion of a single science/technology library for the campus.

Susan Ardis, head librarian, McKinney Engineering Library (and head, Engineering & Science Libraries Division) distributed photocopies of a seven page PowerPoint presentation she prepared for the committee: "What if there were one science library instead of five"? The Chemistry, Engineering, Geology, Life Science and Physics-Math-Astronomy (PMA) libraries are generally running out of space for new books and journals, cramped for work space and student seating, and serving large clienteles as best they are able given their various limitations, including service hours. Also, the older building spaces they occupy are not ADA-compliant, nor easily altered. Advantages and disadvantages of a single science/technology library were presented.

A single science/technology library would require building space of perhaps 80,000 square feet, and could provide better service to users as well as study, classroom, and meeting space. Places are available but would require other buildings to be razed: the Service Building on 24th Street and the Van de Graaff Tower between Engineering-Science Building on Cockrell Hall are two possible sites. Professor Charles Radin proposed a topic for an upcoming meeting: “What is Google doing?” He noted the recent initiative by Google to scan large libraries. A brief tour of the engineering library was given.

March 31 Meeting (GEB 3.312)

This meeting was in the Gebauer Building 3rd Floor Dean's Conference Room, College of Liberal Arts, because Welch Hall does not a conference room.

David Flaxbart, head librarian, Mallet Chemistry Library, gave a PowerPoint presentation on the evolving use of the chemistry library on campus and its comparative ranking among its national peer libraries. There is decreasing use of the physical collection and the increasing use of the digital collection. Other issues include the decreasing number of publishers and the increasing prices of monographs and serials, new and developing niches within the literature, and the increasing need for medical literature on campus.

David Flaxbart's presentation included a collaborative project between the chemistry library and the chemistry department titled the Academic Genealogy of Chemistry Faculty, located at <http://www.lib.utexas.edu/chem./genealogy/>. The Google digitizing project vis-à-vis non-English-speaking countries was discussed briefly.

April 21 Special Meeting (PCL 3.204)
Fred Heath introduced his distinguished colleague, Sarah Thomas, the Carl A. Kroch University Librarian at Cornell University. Her abridged PowerPoint slide presentation with running commentary to the committee was titled, The Library as Intellectual and Social Crossroads. Dr. Thomas talked about trends affecting library buildings and surveyed various illustrative strategies on different college and university campuses across the country with regard to library spaces, their user communities, books, and library staff.

April 21 Meeting (GEO 4.102)

This meeting was in the Barrow Family Conference Room in the geology building.

Dennis Trombatore, head librarian, Walter Geology Library, talked about how he tries to emphasize the model of "clinical librarianship" to build both the collection and to market its utility to researchers – grad students, faculty, and regular community users – by focusing on their research and topical interests and adding value to the information stream by selecting and filtering for them based on his knowledge of their teaching, reading, and research interests. He also discussed the responsibilities of having major endowment funding and how he views this in terms of regional and national collections. The endowment income (~$30k to $50k per year) is most helpful in building collections.

Dr. Denise Apperson, associate chairman, Department of Geological Sciences, commented on how important the geology library is to its many constituents, including researchers on campus and at the Pickle Research Campus, graduate students and undergraduates majoring in geological sciences, and undergraduates who take geology service courses. Brief tours of the geology library were given.

This was the final Library Committee meeting of 2004-05.

Library Committee membership for 2004-05 is at <http://www.utexas.edu/faculty/council/2004-2005/standcom/C-7.html> or at <http://www.lib.utexas.edu/vprovost/meetings/ulc_index.html>.

The committee chair thanks Jocelyn S. Duffy, assistant to the vice provost and director, University of Texas Libraries, for taking minutes at each meeting, organizing the meeting times, sending meeting notices to committee members, procuring lunch, and much, much more.


Kenneth M. Ralls, chair