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DOCUMENTS OF THE GENERAL FACULTY

CHANGES TO THE COLLEGE OF COMMUNICATION CHAPTER OF
THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2006-2008



Dean Roderick Hart of the College of Communication has filed with the secretary of the Faculty Council the following changes to the College of Communication chapter of the Undergraduate Catalog, 2006-2008. The faculty and the dean of the college approved the proposed changes on October 11, 2005. The dean submitted the changes to the secretary on October 14, 2005. The secretary has classified this proposal as legislation of exclusive application and primary interest to a single college or school.

The edited proposal was received from the Office of Official Publications on January 27, 2006, and was sent to the Committee on Undergraduate Degree Program Review from the Office of the General Faculty on January 27, 2006. The committee forwarded the proposed changes to the Office of the General Faculty on February 20, 2006, recommending approval. The authority to grant final approval on behalf of the General Faculty resides with the Faculty Council.

If no objection is filed with the Office of the General Faculty by the date specified below, the legislation will be held to have been approved by the Faculty Council. If objection is filed within the prescribed period, the legislation will be presented to the Faculty Council at its next meeting. The objection, with reasons, must be signed by a member of the Faculty Council.

To be counted, a protest must be received in the Office of the General Faculty by noon on March 3, 2006.

<signed>

Sue Alexander Greninger, Secretary
The Faculty Council



This legislation was posted on the Faculty Council Web site (http://www.utexas.edu/faculty/council/) on February 24, 2006. Paper copies are available on request from the Office of the General Faculty, WMB 2.102, F9500.

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CHANGES TO THE COLLEGE OF COMMUNICATION CHAPTER OF
THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2006-2008



On pages 71-72, under the heading ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES, in the College of Communication chapter of the Undergraduate Catalog, 2004-2006, make the following changes:


GRAMMAR, SPELLING AND PUNCTUATION TEST

Journalism and public relations majors must earn a passing score of 45 on the College of Communication Grammar, Spelling and Punctuation (GSP) Test as described in the requirements of their major. Students who receive transfer credit for Journalism 315 must also take and pass the [Grammar, Spelling and Punctuation Test] test before enrolling in subsequent courses in the major. All students must pass the test before enrolling in courses for which it is a prerequisite.

Students may take the test up to three times. If a journalism student has not passed the test after three trials, the student may [not] enroll in [courses that require the test] a GSP review class offered each semester by the School of Journalism. The student may take the test a fourth and final time upon completion of the review class. If the student does not pass the test on the fourth attempt, he or she may not enroll in any course for which the test is a prerequisite. Public relations majors may take the GSP review class with the permission of the School of Journalism; permission is granted only when space is available. Students whose native language is not English may appeal to the School of Journalism to waive the three-trial limit. Information about test dates is available from the Measurement and Evaluation Center, 2616 Wichita, and the School of Journalism.

RATIONALE: Students in The School of Journalism currently have no other option after taking the GSP test a third time and request numerous waivers, which did not comply with the requirements for most upper division classes. This past year we decided to address this issue by offering a GSP review class. This class has given those students who have failed the test three times both instruction in grammar, spelling, and punctuation and a fourth chance at passing the test. Successful completion of the class has yielded high success rates for passing it after the fourth trial.

HONORS

SENIOR FELLOWS PROGRAM

The Senior Fellows Program is a college-wide honors program providing a broad, interdisciplinary supplement to the student's major. The program is designed for students with the talent and interest to go beyond the usual undergraduate experience [;participants]. Participants who complete four honors courses in communication with a grade of B in each earn the distinction of Senior Fellow. The coursework is undertaken in conjunction with the student’s degree [while fulfilling the] requirements [of one of the majors in the college]. Students with a grade point average of at least 3.30 are invited to apply to participate during their junior and/or senior years. Requirements for admission include completion of the formal application process, which includes a written statement of purpose indicating why the student wishes to be part of the program, and an interview with members of the faculty committee that oversees the program. Twenty-five to thirty students are selected for the program each year.

RATIONALE: This change is being added to the catalog to clarify for students the requirements for Senior Fellow distinction and to preserve the integrity of the program.

DEPARTMENTAL HONORS PROGRAM

{No change to introductory paragraphs or to Advertising, Communication Sciences and Disorders,

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Communication Studies, Journalism, and Radio-Television-Film Honors Programs.}

PUBLIC RELATIONS HONORS PROGRAM

Students who plan to seek special honors in public relations should apply to the public relations adviser for admission to the honors program upon completion of sixty semester hours of coursework; they must apply no later than upon completion of ninety semester hours. A University grade point average of at least 3.25 and a grade point average in public relations of at least 3.50 are required for admission. The requirements for graduation with special honors are (1) Public Relations 379H, Honors Tutorial Course, with a grade of at least B; (2) a University grade point average of at least 3.25 and a grade point average in public relations of at least 3.50; and (3) completion in residence at the University of at least sixty semester hours of coursework counted toward the degree of Bachelor of Science in Public Relations.

RATIONALE:Adding the Public Relations Honors Program will strengthen the Advertising Department’s curriculum and will provide the opportunity for students desiring to participate in an Honors Program in Public Relation.

On page 73, under the heading ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES, in the College of Communication chapter of the Undergraduate Catalog, 2004-2006, make the following changes:


UNITED STATES LATINO AND LATIN AMERICAN MEDIA STUDIES CONCENTRATION

This concentration is designed to introduce students to United States Latino and Latin American issues in communication and the media and to give them the opportunity to prepare for professional work related to these areas. Completion of the concentration requires twelve semester hours of coursework, consisting of one required course and nine hours of elective work in upper-division courses. Any College of Communication student may enroll in any of the concentration courses for which he or she meets the prerequisite. The student must have a University grade point average of at least 2.25 to enroll in any upper-division course in the college.

[Completion of the concentration requires twelve semester hours of coursework, consisting of one required course and nine hours of elective work in upper-division courses.] The student must [see an adviser in the Office of Student Affairs to fill out a concentration] submit an application form [before enrolling in his or her first concentration course.] online to the Office of Student Affairs in order to enroll in the US Latino and Latin American Media Studies concentration. Certain course prerequisites may be waived [after] once the student completes the concentration application form.

Each degree program in the college imposes a limit on the number of hours in the college that may be counted toward the degree; each also imposes limits on the number of hours in the major that may be counted. For students who complete the US Latino and Latin American media studies concentration, these limits may be [raised] modified with the approval of the Office of Student Affairs.

Students should consult the Office of Student Affairs for additional information about the program and the coursework that meets concentration requirements. The courses that may be counted toward this concentration include, but are not limited to, the following. [Students should consult the Office of Student Affairs for information about other concentration courses.]

CONCENTRATION COURSES

REQUIRED COURSE

Communication 316M, Communication and Ethnic Groups or Radio-Television-Film 316M, Communication and Ethnic Groups

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ELECTIVES

Advertising 334, International Advertising

Advertising 378, Topic: Advertising in Multicultural Markets

[Radio-Television-Film 345, Topic 3: History of Mexican Cinema]

[Radio-Television-Film 345, Topic 4: Latin American Cinema]

[Radio-Television-Film 359S, Topic 1: Hispanic Images and Counterimages]

[Radio-Television-Film 365, Topic 4: History of United States Latino Media]

[Radio-Television-Film 365, Topic 5: Latin American Media]

[Radio-Television-Film 365, Topic 6: Latinos and Media]

[Radio-Television-Film 365, Topic 7: Narrowcasting]

[Journalism 335, Narrative Journalism]

Journalism 340C, Topic 1: Mass Media and Minorities

Journalism 349T, Topic 4: International Reporting

Journalism 367E, Journalism in Latin America

Radio-Television-Film 359S, Topic: Brazilian Media and Culture

Radio-Television-Film 365, Topic: Race, Class, and Media

RATIONALE: Changes reflect modifications made to the application process (an on-line application), the addition of new courses and the deletion of courses that have not been offered in some time.
On pages 75-76, under the heading DEGREES, in the College of Communication chapter of the Undergraduate Catalog, 2004-2006, make the following changes:


DEGREES OFFERED

In the College of Communication, six undergraduate degrees are offered: Bachelor of Science in Advertising, Bachelor of Science in Communication Sciences and Disorders, Bachelor of Science in Communication Studies, Bachelor of Journalism, Bachelor of Science in Public Relations, and Bachelor of Science in Radio-Television-Film. The requirements of each degree are divided into special requirements, prescribed work, and major requirements; these are given later in this chapter under the heading for the degree. In addition, the student must fulfill the University-wide graduation requirements given on pages 18-19 and the special requirements of the College of Communication given on page 74.

A student may not earn more than two undergraduate degrees from the College of Communication. A student may not earn both the Bachelor of Science in Advertising and the Bachelor of Science in Public Relations.

RATIONALE: Offering a double-major would be a very popular option, but allowing students to double major in both Advertising and Public Relations would require additional teaching resources that are not available. Additionally, the hour requirement for a second degree would result in these students taking much longer to complete their degree programs.
{No changes to the section “Writing Requirement.”}

COMMUNICATION AND CULTURE REQUIREMENT

As part of the prescribed work for all degrees, students must complete three semester hours of course­work in the College of Communication dealing with the study of communication issues concerning at least one minority or nondominant group within the United States. Courses used to fulfill this requirement may also be used to

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fulfill other degree requirements. Multicultural courses include, but are not limited to, the following; all courses that fulfill this requirement are identified in the Course Schedule.

Advertising 371J, Advertising and Society

Advertising 378, Topic 2: Advanced Issues in Multi­cultural Markets

Advertising 378, Topic: African Americans and the Media

Communication 316M, Communication and Ethnic Groups

Communication Sciences and Disorders 308K, Perspectives on Deafness

Communication Sciences and Disorders 360M, Communication and Deaf People

Communication Studies 314L, Language, Communication, and Culture

Communication Studies 340K, Communication and Social Change

Communication Studies 355K, Intercultural Communication

Communication Studies 365K, Male-Female Communication

Communication Studies 367, Topic: Language and Culture

Journalism 335, Narrative Journalism

Journalism 340C, Topic 1: Mass Media and Minorities

Journalism 340C, Topic 2: African Americans and the Media

Journalism 340C, Topic 3: Journalism and Religion

Journalism 340C, Topic: African American Athletes and the Media

Journalism 340C, Topic: Leadership, Management, and the Media

Journalism 340C, Topic: Women and the News


Radio-Television-Film 331K, Topic 1: Cult Movies and Gender Issues

Radio-Television-Film 331K, Topic 2: Television and Theories of Gender

Radio-Television-Film 359S, Topic 1: Hispanic Images and Counterimages

Radio-Television-Film 365, Topic 4: History of United States Latino Media

Radio-Television-Film 365, Topic 6: Latinos and Media

Radio-Television-Film 370, Topic: Women and Film

RATIONALE: The School of Journalism has added additional J340C courses since the last catalog change and we wanted to make sure that all were listed. All four courses are offered or have been offered in the recent past and fulfill the Communication and Culture Requirement.

APPLICABILITY OF CERTAIN COURSES

[AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE]


[Coursework in American Sign Language may not be used to fulfill any major requirement in the College of Communication and may not be included in the coursework in the college that is counted toward the degree.]

RATIONALE:In the past when American Sign Language was housed under the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, it had a CSD course abbreviation that the degree audit program recognized as communication coursework even though it was a foreign language. This paragraph was inserted into the catalog to inform students that these courses were not communication coursework. Since moving to Liberal Arts with a new department abbreviation, this is no longer an issue. Therefore, this information can be removed from the catalog.
INTERNSHIP CREDIT

Some communication degree programs require an internship; in other programs, students may elect to complete an internship. In either case, the student must be a communication major and must meet the prerequisite for the

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internship course. Up to but no more than four semester hours of credit in internship courses may be counted toward the student’s degree.

RATIONALE: In the past when American Sign Language was housed under the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, it had a CSD course abbreviation that the degree audit program recognized as communication coursework even though it was a foreign language. This paragraph was inserted into the catalog to inform students that these courses were not communication coursework. Since moving to Liberal Arts with a new department abbreviation, this is no longer an issue. Therefore, this information can be removed from the catalog.

{No changes to the sections “Physical Activity Courses and “ROTC Courses.”}

CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT AND CORRESPONDENCE AND EXTENSION COURSES

Credit that a University student in residence earns simultaneously by correspondence or extension from the University or elsewhere or in residence at another school will not be counted toward a degree in the College of Communication unless specifically approved in advance by the dean. Requests to take communication courses by correspondence or extension are normally disapproved. A student in his or her final semester may not enroll concurrently at another institution in any course that is to be counted toward the degree. No more than 30 percent of the semester hours required for any degree offered in the College of Communication may be taken by correspondence.

RATIONALE: This statement is being added to encourage students to take communication coursework in residence.

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On pages 77-78, 79, 81, 83, 85, and 87 under the heading DEGREES, in the respective sections, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ADVERSTISING,BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN COMMUNICATION SCIENCES AND DISORDERS,BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN COMMUNICATION STUDIES,BACHELOR OF JOURNALISM,BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PUBLIC RELATIONS, and BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN RADIO-TELEVISION-FILM, in the College of Communication chapter of the Undergraduate Catalog, 2004-2006, make the following changes:


PRESCRIBED WORK

{No changes in requirements 1 through 4.}

5. Students must [complete four semesters in a single] demonstrate fourth-semester-level proficiency in a foreign language. [These courses] Courses taken to meet this requirement may not be taken on the pass/fail basis.

Students who enter the University with a foreign language deficiency must take the first two semesters in a foreign language without degree credit to remove the deficiency.

The usual course sequence in foreign languages is 406 or 506, 407 or 507 or 508K, 312K, and 312L. For some languages, different course numbers are used; such courses may be counted toward this requirement if they are designed to provide first-semester-level through fourth-semester-level proficiency. [Any part of this requirement may be fulfilled by credit by examination.] Credit may be earned by examination for any part of the sequence.

[Students who enter the University with a foreign language deficiency must take the first two semesters in a foreign language without degree credit to remove the deficiency. Students must then complete two semesters beyond those courses in the same language to fulfill the foreign language requirement.]

An extensive foreign language testing program is available at the University. Students with knowledge of a language are encouraged to take appropriate tests both to earn as much credit as possible and to be placed at the proper level for further study. Students should consult the Measurement and Evaluation Center or the department concerned for information on testing.

RATIONALE: This change is being made to clarify the foreign language requirement.