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DOCUMENTS OF THE GENERAL FACULTY

CHANGES TO THE BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING IN THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING CHAPTER OFTHE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 2006-2008

Dean Ben Streetman of the College of Engineering has filed with the secretary of the Faculty Council the following changes to the Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Engineering in the College of Engineering chapter of the Undergraduate Catalog, 2006-2008. The faculty and the dean of the college approved the proposed changes on October 24, 2005, and November 3, 2005. The dean submitted the changes to the secretary on November 15, 2005. The secretary has classified this proposal as legislation of exclusive application and primary interest to a single college or school.

The edited proposal was received from the Office of Official Publications on April 19, 2006, and was sent to the Committee on Undergraduate Degree Program Review from the Office of the General Faculty on April 20, 2006. The committee forwarded the proposed changes to the Office of the General Faculty on XXX, 2006, recommending approval. The authority to grant final approval on behalf of the General Faculty resides with the Faculty Council.

If no objection is filed with the Office of the General Faculty by the date specified below, the legislation will be held to have been approved by the Faculty Council. If objection is filed within the prescribed period, the legislation will be presented to the Faculty Council at its next meeting. The objection, with reasons, must be signed by a member of the Faculty Council.

To be counted, a protest must be received in the Office of the General Faculty by noon on May xx, 2006.


Sue Alexander Greninger, Secretary
The Faculty Council


This legislation was posted on the Faculty Council Web site on May xx, 2006. Paper copies are available on request from the Office of the General Faculty, WMB 2.102, F9500.


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CHANGES TO THE BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING IN THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING CHAPTER OFTHE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 2006-2008

On pages 151-153, under the heading DEGREES, in the College of Engineering chapter of the Undergraduate Catalog, 2004-2006, make the following changes:

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING

 The mission of the Department of Biomedical Engineering is [to provide a rigorous education at the intersection of engineering and science as these fields relate to the molecular diagnosis and prevention of disease] to develop clinically translatable solutions for human health by training the next generation of biomedical engineers, cultivating leaders, and nurturing the integration of science, engineering, and medicine in a discovery-centered environment. The main educational objective is to provide a thorough training in the fundamentals of engineering science, design, and biology. The curriculum is designed to provide concepts central to understanding living systems from the molecular and cellular levels to the tissue and organismal levels. The curriculum incorporates principles of vertical integration, leading to the choice of a technical area (biomedical imaging and instrumentation, [cell] cellular and biomolecular engineering, or computational biomedical engineering), and culminates in a team capstone design experience. Research, industrial, and clinical internships provide students with novel educational experiences and unique perspectives on biomedical engineering applications. Students are expected to develop an understanding of industrial, research, and clinical biomedical engineering environments; an understanding of regulatory issues and biomedical ethics; the ability to identify, formulate, and solve biomedical engineering problems; the ability to design systems to meet needs in medical/life science applications; an understanding of life processes at the molecular, cellular, tissue, and organismal levels; the ability to use instrumentation and to make measurements and interpret data in living systems; and an appreciation of the interdisciplinary nature of biomedical engineering research[; and the ability to use instrumentation to measure phenomena in living systems].

 RATIONALE: Clarification of mission.

 PROGRAM OUTCOMES

Graduates of the biomedical engineering program are expected to be able to

Apply knowledge of biological and physical sciences, mathematics, and engineering to solve problems at the interface of engineering and biology.

  • Design and conduct experiments and analyze and interpret data to support the understanding of biological systems and processes.
  • Design a biomedical engineering system, component, and/or process that meets specific needs; and demonstrate understanding of relevant technical, professional, and ethical issues.
  • Function on multidisciplinary teams.
  • Communicate effectively in oral, written, and graphical formats.
  • Identify, formulate, and solve biomedical engineering problems that address contemporary issues within a global, societal, and economic context.
  • Recognize the need to pursue continuing educational opportunities in biomedical engineering and have the ability to do so.

PROGRAM EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

Achievement of the preceding program outcomes gives students the foundation for accomplishing the biomedical engineering program educational objectives. A few years after graduation, students are expected to


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be able to

  • Conduct themselves with exemplary professional ethics and highest integrity.
  • Demonstrate a quantitative, analytical, and systems approach to problem solving in their professional practice.
  • Demonstrate a continuous quest for professional excellence and success.
  • Participate in continuing education to expand their knowledge of contemporary professional issues.
  • Exhibit effective scientific, technical, communication, and resource management skills in their professional practice.

CURRICULUM

Course requirements are divided into three categories: basic sequence courses, major sequence courses, and other required courses. The first two years of the curriculum consist of basic sequence core courses for all biomedical engineering students. [Enrollment] Subsequent enrollment in major sequence courses and one of three technical areas is restricted to students who have received credit for all of the basic sequence courses and have been admitted to the major sequence by the College of Engineering Admissions Committee. (Requirements for admission to a major sequence are given on pages 134-135.) Enrollment in other required courses is not restricted by completion of the basic sequence.

[Courses used to fulfill technical and nontechnical elective requirements must be approved by] Prior to registration, students must receive approval from the Biomedical Engineering Undergraduate Advising Office [before the student registers for them] for courses to be used to fulfill technical and nontechnical elective requirements. Courses that fulfill the social science and fine arts/humanities requirements are listed on pages 142-143. The student must take all courses required for the degree on the letter-grade basis and must earn a grade of at least C in each.

COURSES
SEMESTER
HOURS
Basic Sequence Courses
  Biology 205L or 206L, [211, 212,] 311C, Biomedical Engineering 102, 303, 311, 313, 314, 333T, Chemistry 302, 204, [118K,] 318M or 310M,
Mathematics 408C, 408D, 427K,
Physics 303K, 303L, 103M, 103N, Rhetoric and [Composition] Writing 306
52 [45
Major Sequence Courses
  Biomedical Engineering 221, [333T,] 335, 348, 251, 353, [360,] 365R, 365S, 370, 371, Chemistry 369 or 339K
28 [31
  Approved technical electives
21 [18
  Biomedical engineering senior electives
6  
Other Required Courses
 
  Chemistry 118K, 353M or 353, [Electrical Engineering 312,] English 316K
7 [9
  [One of the following
For students in technical areas 1A and 1B: Biomedical Engineering 31,1 Electrical Engineering 322C;
for those in technical area 2: Chemical Engineering 350, Chemistry 369;
for those in technical area 3: Chemistry 369, Electrical Engineering 322C
[6
  American government, including Texas government
6  
  American history
6  
  Approved social science elective
3  
  Approved fine arts or humanities elective
3  
   
MINIMUM REQUIRED
132 [133]  

RATIONALE: Clarification of first two years and addition of ABET Professional Objectives.


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TECHNICAL AREA OPTIONS

The technical area option allows the student to [choose eighteen] build on the biomedical engineering core curriculum by choosing twenty-one semester hours of technical area coursework in biomedical imaging and instrumentation, cellular and biomolecular engineering, or computational biomedical engineering. Each student should choose a technical area by the end of the sophomore year and plan an academic program to meet the area requirements [in] during the next two years.

Preparation for health professions. Students who plan to [go on to] attend medical, veterinary, or dental school in Texas must complete coursework in addition to that required for the BSBmE in order to meet professional school admission requirements; those who plan to attend schools outside Texas may need additional coursework. The student is responsible for knowing and meeting these additional requirements, but assistance and information are available from the Health Professions Office in the College of Natural Sciences, Geography Building 234. Additional information is available at http://www.utexas.edu/cons/hpo/.

Preparation for law. There is no sequential arrangement of courses prescribed for a prelaw program. The Association of American Law Schools puts special emphasis on comprehension and expression in words, critical understanding of the human institutions and values with which the law deals, and analytical power in thinking. Courses relevant to these objectives deal with communication of ideas, logic, mathematics, social sciences, history, philosophy, and the physical sciences. Services for prelaw students are provided by Liberal Arts Career Services, Dorothy Gebauer Building 1.308. Engineering prelaw students may consult the prelaw adviser in LACS. Additional information is available at http://www.lacs.utexas.edu/.

Plan II Honors Program. Students enrolled in the Plan II Honors Program are encouraged to contact the Biomedical Engineering Plan II faculty adviser, the Biomedical Engineering Undergraduate Advising Office, and the Plan II Office to ensure that requirements for both programs are met. Plan II courses may count toward biomedical engineering program requirements.

Certificate programs. Biomedical engineering students may enrich their education through the following certificate programs.

Business Foundations Program. Students who wish to learn about fundamental business concepts and practices may take supplemental coursework that leads to the Business Foundations Certificate, awarded by the Red McCombs School of Business. The Business Foundations Program is described on pages 47-48. For more information, contact the McCombs School or the Biomedical Engineering Undergraduate Advising Office, or visit http://www.mccombs.utexas.edu/udean/major/foundations/.

Elements of Computing. Students who wish to learn about computer sciences may take the coursework that leads to the certificate in the Elements of Computing, awarded by the Department of Computer Sciences. The Elements of Computing Program is described on page 415. For more information, contact the Department of Computer Sciences or the Biomedical Engineering Undergraduate Advising Office, or visit http://academics.cs.utexas.edu/undergraduate/nonmajor/elements.html.

TECHNICAL AREA 1, BIOMEDICAL IMAGING AND INSTRUMENTATION

[The objective of this area is to bring together students with knowledge and skills in the general area of medical instrumentation and imaging science. A solid foundation is established in analog and digital network analysis. Technical area 1A emphasizes instrumentation, while technical area 1B examines biomedical image processing for medical applications.] This technical area is designed for students interested in the general area of medical instrumentation and imaging science. The main objective is to prepare students to design and use biomedical instrumentation for imaging, diagnostic, and therapeutic applications, with focus on the new fields of molecular engineering, cell and tissue engineering, and biotechnology. A solid foundation, practical knowledge, and skills are established in analog and digital network analysis, software and hardware programming, electronic circuits, sensors, data acquisition systems, image and signal processing, and computational analysis of data as it applies to living systems.


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Students must complete the following [four] five courses:

Biomedical Engineering 343, Biomedical Engineering Signal and Systems Analysis
Electrical Engineering 319K, Introduction to Microcontrollers
Electrical Engineering 322C, Data Structures
Electrical Engineering 438, Electronic Circuits I
Electrical Engineering 345S, Real-Time Digital Signal Processing Laboratory

In addition, students must complete six hours of coursework [in one of] chosen from the following [options] list:

Astronomy 376, Topic: Astronomical Instrumentation
Biomedical Engineering 357, Biomedical Imaging Modalities Laboratory
Biomedical Engineering 374K, Biomedical Electronics, and Biomedical Engineering 374L, Applications of Biomedical Engineering Laboratory
Electrical Engineering 345L, Microprocessor Applications and Organization, and Electrical Engineering 345M, Embedded and Real-Time Systems Laboratory
Electrical Engineering 347, Modern Optics
Electrical Engineering 351M, Digital Signal Processing
Electrical Engineering 371R, Digital Image and Video Processing

[Option A: Digital Applications]

[Biomedical Engineering 374K, Biomedical Electronics, and Biomedical Engineering 374L, Applications of Biomedical Engineering Laboratory
or
Electrical Engineering 345L, Microprocessor Applications and Organization, and Electrical Engineering 345M, Embedded and Real-Time Systems Laboratory
]

[Option B: Imaging Applications]

[Astronomy 376, Topic: Astronomical Instrumentation]
[Biomedical Engineering 357, Biomedical Imaging Modalities Laboratory]
[Electrical Engineering 347, Modern Optics]
[Electrical Engineering 351M, Digital Signal Processing]
[Electrical Engineering 371R, Digital Image and Video Processing]

TECHNICAL AREA 2, [CELL]CELLULAR AND BIOMOLECULAR ENGINEERING

 The major objective of this area is to teach students how to integrate knowledge in cell and molecular biology with engineering analysis, so that they can address problems in molecular-based medicine. Three disciplines within this technical area are tissue engineering as it relates to the underlying molecular biology issues; materials science, with an emphasis on bioactive materials and construction of nanoscale devices and probes; and bioengineering analysis of infectious diseases and immunological responses.

Students must take the following [three] four courses:

Biology 325, Genetics
Biomedical Engineering 339, Biochemical Engineering
Biomedical Engineering 352, AdvancedEngineering Biomaterials
Chemical Engineering 350, Chemical Engineering Materials

[In addition, students must complete nine hours of coursework from the following list; at least one course must have a laboratory and at least one must be in engineering.]

[Biology 323L, Laboratory Studies in Cell Biology]


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[Biology 325L, Laboratory Experience in Genetics]
[Biology 226R, General Microbiology: Microbial Cell Structure and Genetics, and Biology 126L, General Microbiology Laboratory]
[Biology 344, Molecular Biology]
[Biomedical Engineering 354, Molecular Sensors and Nanodevices for Biomedical Engineering Applications]
[Biomedical Engineering 379, Cell and Tissue Engineering]
[Chemistry 118L, Organic Chemistry Laboratory, and Chemistry 318N, Organic Chemistry II]

In addition, students must complete nine hours of coursework chosen from the following list; at least three hours must be in biomedical engineering.

Biomedical Engineering 354, Molecular Sensors and Nanodevices for Biomedical Engineering Applications
Biomedical Engineering 379, Cell and Tissue Engineering
Approved upper-division biology courses
Chemistry 318N, Organic Chemistry II, and 118L, Organic Chemistry Laboratory; or 310N, Organic Chemistry II, and 210C, Organic Chemistry Laboratory

TECHNICAL AREA 3, COMPUTATIONAL BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING

The objective of this area is to provide students with the knowledge and skills that will enable them to design and use computational algorithms [and techniques in engineering and information science to study] to address problems in [biomedicine] biomedical research and health care. Examples include (a) designing medical decision aids using statistical and machine learning models, (b) dynamic modeling and computer simulation to study the biomechanics and control of movement, (c) development of thermodynamic models of dynamic processes at the microscopic and macroscopic scales in biological systems, and (d) image processing techniques for quantitative measurement and interpretation of biomedical images.

All students must complete the following [four] six courses:

Biomedical Engineering 341, Engineering Tools for Computational Biology Laboratory,or Biomedical Engineering 346, Introduction to Computational Structural Biology
Computer Sciences 323E, Elements of Scientific Computing
Electrical Engineering 322C, Data Structures
Electrical Engineering 360C, Algorithms
Mathematics 325K, Discrete Mathematics, or Philosophy 313K, Logic, Sets, and Functions
Mathematics 340L, Matrices and Matrix Calculations

In addition, students must complete six hours of coursework chosen from the following list[; at least one of these courses must be in engineering].

Biomedical Engineering 341, Engineering Tools for Computational Biology Laboratory
Biomedical Engineering 342, Computational Biomechanics
Biomedical Engineering 345, Graphics and Visualization [Laboratory]
Biomedical Engineering 346, Introduction to Computational Structural Biology
[Electrical Engineering 332, Computer Graphics]
Computer Sciences 313E, Elements of Software Design
Computer Sciences 327E, Elements of Databases
Other approved computer sciences courses

RATIONALE: After offering the first three years of classes, changes were made to help make smooth transition between first two years and last two years of degree plan. Additional information on Technical Areas and certificates available.


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SENIOR ENGINEERING ELECTIVES

All students must complete six hours in senior engineering electives. At least three hours must be in a lecture or laboratory course. Three hours may be in a research project or an internship. The following may be counted toward this requirement:

An engineering course in any one of the three technical areas. A course may not be counted toward both the technical area requirement and the senior elective requirement.
[With the adviser’s consent, any] An approved upper-division engineering, mathematics, physics, or computer sciences course. A course may not be counted toward both the technical area requirement and the senior elective requirement.
[ 
 Biomedical Engineering 361, Biomedical Engineering Industrial and Business Projects
[ 
Biomedical Engineering 177, 277, 377, Undergraduate Research Project]
[One of the following four courses:] Three hours of coursework chosen from the following list:
  Biomedical Engineering 325L, Cooperative Engineering, or Biomedical Engineering 225M, Cooperative Engineering
Biomedical Engineering 177, 277, 377, Undergraduate Research Project
Biomedical Engineering 377P, Clinical Research Internship
Biomedical Engineering 377Q, Clinical Medical Internship
Biomedical Engineering 377R, Research Internship

[The clinical research internship program allows students to perform research in laboratories at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, or an approved program at another medical school; the clinical medical internship program gives students the opportunity to work directly with a single physician or a team of practicing physicians at either institution. In the clinical medical internship, students participate in clinical inpatient rounds, outpatient visits, operating room procedures, and medical grand rounds. This experience gives them direct knowledge of the medical needs that can be addressed by biomedical engineering. In the research internship program, students perform biomedical research with biomedical engineering faculty members at UT Austin and/or the Texas Medical Center in Houston or with faculty members in an approved program at another medical school. The industrial internship program consists of summer internships at partner biomedical companies or government laboratories.]

RATIONALE: Clarification of elective choice.