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DOCUMENTS OF THE GENERAL FACULTY

CHANGES TO THE BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING IN THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING CHAPTER OF
THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 2006-2008


Dean Ben Streetman of the College of Engineering has filed with the secretary of the Faculty Council the following changes to the Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering in the College of Engineering chapter of the Undergraduate Catalog, 2006-2008. The faculty and the dean of the college approved the proposed changes on October 24, 2005, and November 3, 2005. The dean submitted the changes to the secretary on November 15, 2005. The secretary has classified this proposal as legislation of exclusive application and primary interest to a single college or school.

The edited proposal was received from the Office of Official Publications on April 19, 2006, and was sent to the Committee on Undergraduate Degree Program Review from the Office of the General Faculty on April 20, 2006. The committee forwarded the proposed changes to the Office of the General Faculty on May 1, 2006, recommending approval. The authority to grant final approval on behalf of the General Faculty resides with the Faculty Council.

If no objection is filed with the Office of the General Faculty by the date specified below, the legislation will be held to have been approved by the Faculty Council. If objection is filed within the prescribed period, the legislation will be presented to the Faculty Council at its next meeting. The objection, with reasons, must be signed by a member of the Faculty Council.

To be counted, a protest must be received in the Office of the General Faculty by noon on May 8, 2006.

Greninger signature
Sue Alexander Greninger, Secretary
The Faculty Council


This legislation was posted on the Faculty Council Web site (http://www.utexas.edu/faculty/council/) on May 1, 2006. Paper copies are available on request from the Office of the General Faculty, WMB 2.102, F9500.


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CHANGES TO THE BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ELECTRIC ENGINEERING IN THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING CHAPTER OF
THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 2006-2008


On pages 164-168, under the heading DEGREES, in the College of Engineering chapter of the Undergraduate Catalog, 2004-2006, make the following changes:


BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

Students seeking the Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering pursue one of two curricula--electrical engineering or computer engineering. The electrical engineering curriculum is accredited in electrical engineering by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). The computer engineering curriculum is accredited by ABET in both electrical engineering and computer engineering. Both curricula contain the fundamentals of electrical engineering and computer engineering; they differ in their core and technical area requirements in order to suit different career objectives.

The curricula in electrical engineering and computer engineering are designed to educate students in the fundamentals of engineering, which are built upon a foundation of mathematics, science, communication, and the liberal arts. Graduates should be equipped to advance their knowledge while contributing professionally to a rapidly changing technology. Areas in which electrical and computer engineers contribute significantly are computer and communication systems; control, robotic, and manufacturing systems; power and energy systems; biomedical instrumentation systems; electronic materials; and device design and manufacturing. Typical career paths of graduates include design, development, management, consulting, teaching, and research. Many graduates seek further education in law, medicine, business, or engineering.

The core requirements of the Bachelor of Science [degree in electrical engineering] in Electrical Engineering provide a foundation of engineering fundamentals. Students then build on the core requirements by choosing [two] a primary and a secondary technical [areas] area and a mathematics or science technical elective; students following the electrical engineering curriculum also choose an advanced laboratory course. Once the primary technical area is chosen, the student is assigned a faculty adviser with expertise in that area to help the student select technical area courses that are appropriate to his or her career and educational goals. The curricula thus [ensures] ensure breadth through the core courses and the choice of a technical elective; technical area coursework provides additional depth [in two areas].

PROGRAM EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

{no changes}

CURRICULA

Course requirements are divided into three categories: basic sequence courses, major sequence courses, and other required courses. Enrollment in major sequence courses is restricted to students who have passed the basic sequence courses with acceptable performance. Enrollment in other required courses is not restricted by completion of the basic sequence.

Courses used to fulfill technical area, math or science technical elective, and other elective requirements must be approved by the electrical and computer engineering faculty before the student enrolls in them. Courses that fulfill the social science and fine arts/humanities requirements are listed on pages 142-143.

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ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM

COURSES

SEMESTER
 HOURS


Basic Sequence Courses
  Electrical Engineering 302, 306, 411, 312, 313, 316, 319K, 322C, English 316K, Mathematics 408C, 408D, 427K, 340L, Physics 303K, 303L, 103M, 103N,  
  Rhetoric and [Composition] Writing 306
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Major Sequence Courses

Electrical Engineering 325, 333T, 438, 339, 351K, [155,] 362K, 364D, [464C or 464H or 464K,] 366, and one of the following: 464C, 464G, 464H, 464K, 464R
[27] 29
Approved technical area courses
18 or 1911
Approved mathematics or science technical elective
3

Other Required Courses

  American government, including Texas government
6
  American history
6
  Approved fine arts or humanities elective
3
  Approved social science elective
3
  Approved elective
3
 
MINIMUM REQUIRED
[123 or 124] 125 or 12611


COMPUTER ENGINEERING CURRICULUM

COURSES

SEMESTER
 HOURS


Basic Sequence Courses
  Electrical Engineering 302, 306, 411, 312, 313, 316, 319K, 322C, English 316K, Mathematics 408C, 408D, 325K, 427L, Physics 303K, 303L, 103M, 103N,  
  Rhetoric and [Composition] Writing 306
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Major Sequence Courses

Electrical Engineering 325, 333T, 438, 339, [345L,] 351K, [155,] 362K, 364D, [464C or 464H or 464K,] 366, and one of the following: 464C, 464G, 464H, 464K, 464R
[27] 29
Approved technical area courses
18
Approved mathematics or science technical elective
3

Other Required Courses

  American government, including Texas government
6
  American history
6
  Approved fine arts or humanities elective
3
  Approved social science elective
3
  Approved elective
3
 
MINIMUM REQUIRED
[123] 125


MATHEMATICS OR SCIENCE TECHNICAL ELECTIVE

The math or science technical elective is designed to strengthen a student’s foundation in mathematics or science. This foundation will help graduates adapt to technological change throughout their careers and be better prepared for graduate study in science and engineering. This course must be an upper-division course in one of the following fields of study: mathematics, astronomy, biology, chemistry, and physics. The student may not use a course in one of these fields that is designed for nonmajors. Electrical Engineering 325L may also be used to fulfill this requirement.

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TECHNICAL AREA OPTIONS

[Both electrical engineering and computer engineering students must choose two technical areas from the following list. Electrical engineering students must choose one electrical engineering technical area; the second area may be in either electrical or computer engineering. Computer engineering students must choose one computer engineering technical area; the second area may be in either computer or electrical engineering.]

Both electrical engineering and computer engineering students must choose a primary and a secondary technical area. Electrical engineering students must choose their primary technical area from the electrical engineering technical areas listed below; computer engineering students must choose theirs from the computer engineering areas. For the secondary technical area, students may choose any technical area, including academic enrichment.

[Electrical Engineering Technical Areas]

[•      Biomedical Engineering]
[•      Communications and Networking]
[•      Electromagnetic Engineering]
[•      Electronics]
[•      Electronic Materials and Devices]
[•      Management and Production]
[•      Power Systems and Energy Conversion]
[•      Premedical]
[•      Robotics and Controls]
[•      Signal and Image Processing]

[Computer Engineering Technical Areas]

[•      Computer Design]
[•      Embedded Systems]
[•      Software Development]
[•      System Software]
[•      VLSI Design]

For all technical areas [except premedical,] the student must complete at least three courses in the area on the letter-grade basis. [Because it includes non­engineering courses expected of medical school applicants, the premedical technical area requires completion of thirty-one hours of coursework; all courses must be completed on the letter-grade basis.] A course may not be counted toward more than one technical area.

Electrical engineering students may count [toward the technical area requirement] one of the following advanced laboratory courses toward a technical area requirement: Electrical Engineering 321K, 440, 345L, 345S, 362L, 371C, 372L, and 374L.

[AREA 1, BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING]

[This technical area is designed for students interested in the application of engineering to medicine; it may serve as a foundation for graduate study in biomedical engineering. A related technical area is premedical, described on page 167.]

[Students must complete the following two courses:]

[Electrical Engineering 374K, Biomedical Electronics]
[Electrical Engineering 374L, Applications of Biomedical Engineering]

[They must also complete at least one course from the following list:]


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[Electrical Engineering 325K, Antennas and Wireless Propagation]
[Electrical Engineering 345L, Microprocessor Applications and Organization12]
[Electrical Engineering 347, Modern Optics]
[Electrical Engineering 351M, Digital Signal Processing]
[Mechanical Engineering 354, Introduction to Biomedical Engineering]

[AREA 2, COMMUNICATIONS AND NETWORKING ]

[Electrical Engineering 345S, Real-Time Digital Signal Processing Laboratory]
[Electrical Engineering 360K, Introduction to Digital Communications]
[Electrical Engineering 371M, Communication Systems]
[Electrical Engineering 372N, Telecommunication Networks]
[Electrical Engineering 379K, Topic 18: Network Security]
[Electrical Engineering 379K, Topic 19: Network Engineering Laboratory]
[Electrical Engineering 379K, Topic 21: Information and Cryptography]
[Mechanical Engineering 366L, Operations Research Models]

[AREA 3, COMPUTER DESIGN]

[Students must complete the following two courses:]
[Electrical Engineering 345M, Embedded and Real-Time Systems Laboratory]
[Electrical Engineering 360N, Computer Architecture]

[They must also complete at least one course from the following list:]

[Computer Sciences 375, Compilers]
[Electrical Engineering 345L, Microprocessor Applications and Organization12]
[Electrical Engineering 360M, Digital Systems Design Using VHDL]

[AREA 4, ELECTROMAGNETIC ENGINEERING]

[Electrical Engineering 321K, Mixed Signal and Circuits Laboratory]
[Electrical Engineering 325K, Antennas and Wireless Propagation]
[Electrical Engineering 347, Modern Optics]
[Electrical Engineering 348, Laser and Optical Engineering]
[Electrical Engineering 363M, Microwave and Radio Frequency Engineering]
[Electrical Engineering 363N, Engineering Acoustics]
[Electrical Engineering 379K, Topic: Radio Frequency Circuit Design]
[Physics 355, Modern Physics for Engineers]

[AREA 5, ELECTRONICS]

[Electrical Engineering 321K, Mixed Signal and Circuits Laboratory]
[Electrical Engineering 338K, Electronic Circuits II]
[Electrical Engineering 338L, Analog Integrated Circuit Design]
[Electrical Engineering 362L, Power Electronics]
[Electrical Engineering 374K, Biomedical Electronics]
[Electrical Engineering 379K, Topic: Radio Frequency Circuit Design]
[Mathematics 346, Applied Linear Algebra]

[AREA 6, ELECTRONIC MATERIALS AND DEVICES]

[Students must complete the following course:]

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[Electrical Engineering 440, Microelectronics Fabrication Techniques]

[They must also complete at least two courses from the following list:]

[Electrical Engineering 334K, Theory of Engineering Materials]
[Electrical Engineering 347, Modern Optics]
[Electrical Engineering 348, Laser and Optical Engineering]
[Physics 355, Modern Physics for Engineers]

[AREA 7, EMBEDDED SYSTEMS]

[Students must complete three of the following courses, including at least one course in group 1 and one course in group 2.]

[Electrical Engineering 360N, Computer Architecture]

[Group 1: Embedded Hardware]

[Electrical Engineering 360M, Digital Systems Design Using VHDL]
[Electrical Engineering 360R, Computer-Aided Integrated Circuit Design]

[Group 2: Embedded Software]

[Electrical Engineering 345L, Microprocessor Applications and Organization12]
[Electrical Engineering 345M, Embedded and Real-Time Systems Laboratory]
[Electrical Engineering 345S, Real-Time Digital Signal Processing Laboratory]
[Electrical Engineering 360P, Concurrent and Distributed Systems]

[AREA 8, MANAGEMENT AND PRODUCTION]

[Electrical Engineering 366K, Engineering Economics II]
[Electrical Engineering 366L, Statistics for Manufacturing]
[Electrical Engineering 367L, Topic 5: Engineering Entrepreneurship]
[Electrical Engineering 367L, Topic: Total Quality Management]
[Electrical Engineering 370L, Introduction to Manufacturing Systems Automation]
[Electrical Engineering 379K, Topic 20: Computer Architecture: Personal Computer Design]
[Electrical Engineering 379K, Topic 22: System Design Metrics]
[Mechanical Engineering 366L, Operations Research Models]

[AREA 9, POWER SYSTEMS AND ENERGY CONVERSION]

[Electrical Engineering 341, Electric Drives and Machines]
[Electrical Engineering 362L, Power Electronics]
[Electrical Engineering 368, Electrical Power Transmission and Distribution]
[Electrical Engineering 369, Power Systems Engineering]
[Electrical Engineering 379K, Topic: Power Quality Harmonics]
[Mechanical Engineering 337C, Introduction to Nuclear Power Systems]
[Mechanical Engineering 374S, Solar Energy Systems Design]

[AREA 10, PREMEDICAL]

[Students who plan to go on to medical, veterinary, or dental school must complete coursework in addition to that required for the BSEE in order to meet professional school admission requirements. For example, medical school applicants must have completed twelve semester hours of biological science and sixteen hours of chemistry. The premedical technical area, which incorporates some of these admission requirements, is

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designed for such students. Choosing biomedical engineering as the other technical area will also help the premedical, preveterinary, and predental student to complete the BSEE degree more quickly. A sample four-year program available from the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering illustrates how electives may be used to meet medical school admission requirements.]

[Students pursuing this option must have a grade point average of at least 3.00 at the end of the sophomore year.]

[Students must complete all of the following courses:]

[Biology 206L, Laboratory Experiments in Biology: Structure and Function of Organisms]
[Biology 211, Introductory Biology: Cell Biology]
[Biology 212, Introductory Biology: Genetics and Evolution]
[Biology 214, Introductory Biology: Structure and Function of Organisms]
[Biology 325, Genetics]
[Biology 365R, Vertebrate Physiology I]
[Chemistry 302, Principles of Chemistry II]
[Chemistry 204, Introduction to Chemical Practice]
[Chemistry 310M, Organic Chemistry I]
[Chemistry 310N, Organic Chemistry II]
[Chemistry 210C, Organic Chemistry Laboratory]
[Electrical Engineering 374K, Biomedical Electronics]
[Electrical Engineering 374L, Applications of Biomedical Engineering]

[AREA 11, ROBOTICS AND CONTROLS]

[Electrical Engineering 345L, Microprocessor Applications and Organization 12]
[Electrical Engineering 362K, Introduction to Automatic Control 13]
[Electrical Engineering 370K, Computer Control Systems]
[Electrical Engineering 370L, Introduction to Manufacturing Systems Automation]
[Electrical Engineering 370N, Introduction to Robotics and Mechatronics]
[Electrical Engineering 371D, Introduction to Neural Networks]
[Electrical Engineering 371R, Digital Image and Video Processing]
[Mathematics 374, Fourier and Laplace Transforms]

[AREA 12, SIGNAL AND IMAGE PROCESSING]

[Electrical Engineering 345S, Real-Time Digital Signal Processing Laboratory]
[Electrical Engineering 351M, Digital Signal Processing]
[Electrical Engineering 371D, Introduction to Neural Networks]
[Electrical Engineering 371R, Digital Image and Video Processing]
[Mathematics 374, Fourier and Laplace Transforms]

[AREA 13, SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT]

[Students must complete the following course:]

[Electrical Engineering 360F, Software Engineering Processes]

[They must also complete at least two courses from the following list:]

[Electrical Engineering 360C, Algorithms]
[Electrical Engineering 360P, Concurrent and Distributed Systems]
[Computer Sciences 345, Programming Languages]
[Computer Sciences 373, Software Engineering]



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[AREA 14, SYSTEM SOFTWARE]

[Computer Sciences 347, Data Management]
[Computer Sciences 375, Compilers]
[Electrical Engineering 345L, Microprocessor Applications and Organization12]
[Electrical Engineering 345M, Embedded and Real-Time Systems Laboratory]
[Electrical Engineering 360P, Concurrent and Distributed Systems]
[Electrical Engineering 372N, Telecommunication Networks]
[Mathematics 373K, Algebraic Structures I]

[AREA 15, VLSI DESIGN]

[Students must complete the following two courses:]

[Electrical Engineering 360R, Computer-Aided Integrated Circuit Design]
[Electrical Engineering 360S, Digital Integrated Circuit Design]

[They must also complete at least one of the following courses:]

[Electrical Engineering 338L, Analog Integrated Circuit Design]
[Electrical Engineering 440, Microelectronics Fabrication Techniques]

ACADEMIC ENRICHMENT TECHNICAL AREA

A student may choose the academic enrichment technical area as his or her secondary technical area. For this area, the student selects nine hours of coursework to support his or her personal or career goals. Before registering for these courses, the student must prepare a career plan statement and a list of relevant electives in consultation with a faculty mentor; this plan must be approved by the student, the faculty mentor, and the undergraduate adviser. The faculty mentor must be a full-time faculty member in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

These electives may include traditional upper-division technical courses in electrical engineering and other engineering fields; courses in other fields at the University, such as business, economics, communication, music, and philosophy; or research done with a faculty member for course credit via Electrical Engineering 360. The courses must be completed in residence; courses in an approved study abroad program require the approval of the undergraduate adviser. The nine hours must include at least six hours of upper-division coursework; they may include no more than three hours in Electrical Engineering 125S, Internship in Electrical and Computer Engineering.

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING TECHNICAL AREAS

Biomedical Engineering

Electrical engineers working in biomedical engineering have traditionally been involved in the design and analysis of electronic instruments and therapeutic devices, collection and analysis of biomedical signals and data, and interactions between tissues and electromagnetic fields. Typical medical instruments include biopotential amplifiers (ECG, EMG, and EEG signals), stimulators of electrically excitable tissues (including pacemakers), defibrillators, and devices to measure physical variables such as temperature, pressure, flow, and tissue impedance and admittance. Therapeutic devices include surgical lasers and radio frequency devices and radio frequency, microwave, and ultrasound diathermy. Students should choose the biomedical engineering area if they are interested in applying their electrical engineering expertise to patient care or biological research. Graduates should be prepared for graduate study and for career opportunities in industrial board-level (or chip-level) circuit design and in information and signal processing applications.

Students must complete the following course:



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Electrical Engineering 374K, Biomedical Electronics

and one of the following laboratory courses:

Electrical Engineering 345M, Embedded and Real-Time Systems Laboratory
Electrical Engineering 345S, Real-Time Digital Signal Processing Laboratory
Electrical Engineering 374L, Applications of Biomedical Engineering


and one course from the following list:

Electrical Engineering 325K, Antennas and Wireless Propagation
Electrical Engineering 345M, Embedded and Real-Time Systems Laboratory
Electrical Engineering 345S, Real-Time Digital Signal Processing Laboratory
Electrical Engineering 347, Modern Optics
Electrical Engineering 351M, Digital Signal Processing
Electrical Engineering 374L, Applications of Biomedical Engineering
Biomedical Engineering 365R, Quantitative Engineering Physiology I
Biomedical Engineering 365S, Quantitative Engineering Physiology II
Mechanical Engineering 354, Introduction to Biomechanical Engineering


Communications and Networking

Communications and networking broadly encompasses the principles underlying the design and implementation of systems for information transmission. The field considers how information is represented, compressed, and transmitted on wired and wireless links and how communication networks can be, and are, designed and operated. A student who chooses this technical area should recognize that communications and networking is a broad application domain where many engineering tools come into play: from circuit design for wireless phones to embedded network processors to system and application software for networked systems.

Students must complete three of the following courses:

Electrical Engineering 345S, Real-Time Digital Signal Processing Laboratory
Electrical Engineering 360K, Introduction to Digital Communications
Electrical Engineering 371C, Wireless Communications Laboratory
Electrical Engineering 371M, Communication Systems
Electrical Engineering 372L, Network Engineering Laboratory
Electrical Engineering 372N, Telecommunication Networks
Electrical Engineering 372S, Cryptography and Network Security
Mechanical Engineering 366L, Operations Research Models


Electromagnetic Engineering

This technical area exposes students to different aspects of applied electromagnetics, including antennas, radio wave propagation, microwave and radio frequency circuits and transmission structures, optical components and lasers, and engineering acoustics. A student should choose the electromagnetic engineering area if he or she is interested in engineering that involves the physical layer in modern communication and radar systems. Graduates are well positioned for jobs in antenna design and testing, propagation channel characterization, microwave and RF circuit design, electromagnetic emission testing from electronic devices and systems, radar system design and development, optical telecommunication, optical information and signal processing systems, and component design and development.

Students must complete three of the following courses:

Electrical Engineering 321K, Mixed Signal and Circuits Laboratory
Electrical Engineering 325K, Antennas and Wireless Propagation
Electrical Engineering 347, Modern Optics


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Electrical Engineering 348, Laser and Optical Engineering
Electrical Engineering 361R, Radio Frequency Circuit Design
Electrical Engineering 363M, Microwave and Radio Frequency Engineering
Electrical Engineering 363N, Engineering Acoustics
Physics 355, Modern Physics for Engineers


Electronics

Electronics involves the design and analysis of the circuits that provide the functionality of a system. The types of circuits that students encounter include analog and digital integrated circuits, radio frequency circuits, mixed signal (combination of analog and digital) circuits, power electronics, and biomedical electronics. A student should choose the electronics area if he or she is interested in chip-level integrated circuit design, as opposed to system-level design, and in career opportunities in either chip-level circuit layout, analysis, and design or circuit design management.

Students must complete three of the following courses:

Electrical Engineering 321K, Mixed Signal and Circuits Laboratory
Electrical Engineering 338K, Electronic Circuits II
Electrical Engineering 338L, Analog Integrated Circuit Design
Electrical Engineering 360S, Digital Integrated Circuit Design
Electrical Engineering 361R, Radio Frequency Circuit Design
Electrical Engineering 362L, Power Electronics
Electrical Engineering 374K, Biomedical Electronics
Mathematics 346, Applied Linear Algebra


Electronic Materials and Devices

Within electronic materials and devices, students learn about the materials and devices used in modern electronic and optoelectronic systems. With a heavy emphasis on semiconductors, courses in this area include the fundamentals of charge transport and interactions with light. Devices studied begin with p-n junctions and transistors, the building blocks of integrated circuits. Later courses concentrate on semiconductor lasers and detectors used in optoelectronics. With exposure to the topics in this area, students are well positioned to work in a wide variety of areas that rely on semiconductor technology, such as computers, telecommunications, the automotive industry, and consumer electronics.

Students must complete the following course:

Electrical Engineering 440, Microelectronics Fabrication Techniques

and two of the following courses:

Electrical Engineering 334K, Theory of Engineering Materials
Electrical Engineering 338L, Analog Integrated Circuit Design
Electrical Engineering 347, Modern Optics
Electrical Engineering 348, Laser and Optical Engineering
Electrical Engineering 360S, Digital Integrated Circuit Design
Physics 355, Modern Physics for Engineers


Power Systems and Energy Conversion

This area provides the foundation for a career in electric power systems, generation, grid operation, motors and drives, and renewable energy sources. Power systems involves the study and design of reliable and economic electric power systems, including both traditional and renewable resources; energy conversion involves conversion to and from electrical energy, including the study and design of electrical machines and the conversion of various sources of energy into electrical energy.


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Students must complete three of the following courses:

Electrical Engineering 341, Electric Drives and Machines
Electrical Engineering 362L, Power Electronics
Electrical Engineering 362Q, Power Quality and Harmonics
Electrical Engineering 368, Electrical Power Transmission and Distribution
Electrical Engineering 369, Power Systems Engineering
Mechanical Engineering 337C, Introduction to Nuclear Power Systems
Mechanical Engineering 374S, Solar Energy Systems Design


Premedical

The premedical technical area is designed to allow students preparing for medical school to count some of their premedical requirements toward the electrical engineering degree.

Students must complete the following course:

Electrical Engineering 374K, Biomedical Electronics

and one of the following laboratory courses:

Electrical Engineering 345M, Embedded and Real-Time Systems Laboratory
Electrical Engineering 345S, Real-Time Digital Signal Processing Laboratory
Electrical Engineering 374L, Applications of Biomedical Engineering


and one of the following courses:

Biology 325, Genetics
Biology 365R, Vertebrate Physiology I
Chemistry 310M, Organic Chemistry I
Chemistry 310N, Organic Chemistry II


Robotics and Control

The focus of this technical area is robotics and computer controlled systems. The field of robotics includes designing precession control systems. Today, all robots have highly reliable microcontrollers or computers used as controllers. Control systems are present in many important forms of transportation, including automobiles, aircraft, and ships, and in manufacturing plants, especially in technologically advanced areas like integrated circuit fabrication. Students with a background in robotics and control will be prepared to seek employment involving design and management of projects within these industries.

Students must complete three of the following courses:

Electrical Engineering 345L, Microprocessor Applications and Organization11a
Electrical Engineering 362K, Introduction to Automatic Control11b
Electrical Engineering 370, Automatic Control II
Electrical Engineering 370K, Computer Control Systems
Electrical Engineering 370N, Introduction to Robotics and Mechatronics
Electrical Engineering 371D, Introduction to Neural Networks
Mathematics 374, Fourier and Laplace Transforms


Signal and Image Processing

Signal and image processing involves the improvement of signals, images, and videos by digital means. The reasons for improvement include analysis, information extraction, communication, display, detection, and

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recognition. Students who have exposure to this technical area will be well positioned for software and hardware jobs in digital signal processing and digital image processing.

Students must complete three of the following courses:

Electrical Engineering 345S, Real-Time Digital Signal Processing Laboratory
Electrical Engineering 351M, Digital Signal Processing
Electrical Engineering 371C, Wireless Communications Laboratory
Electrical Engineering 371D, Introduction to Neural Networks
Electrical Engineering 371R, Digital Image and Video Processing
Mathematics 374, Fourier and Laplace Transforms


COMPUTER ENGINEERING TECHNICAL AREAS

Computer Design

Computer design involves understanding the operation and design of computers on many levels, including the instruction set, microarchitecture, logic design, and low?]level system software. The student who chooses computer design as a technical area will be well positioned to join the microprocessor design industry as a logic designer or a circuit designer. After a good deal of experience on the job, the student should be well positioned to become the chief architect of a new design.

Students must complete the following two courses:

Electrical Engineering 345M, Embedded and Real-Time Systems Laboratory
Electrical Engineering 360N, Computer Architecture


and one of the following courses:

Electrical Engineering 345L, Microprocessor Applications and Organization11a
Electrical Engineering 360M, Digital Systems Design Using VHDL
Electrical Engineering 360R, Computer-Aided Integrated Circuit Design
Computer Science 375, Compilers


Embedded Systems

Embedded systems are combinations of software and hardware designed to perform specific functions. These systems may stand alone, or they may be integral parts of a larger system. Within this technical area, students are exposed to logic design, programming, computer architecture, systems design, and digital signal processing. Exposure to these topics positions students for jobs with small, medium, and large companies. These jobs involve defining, designing, and fabricating application-specific processors and computers in areas such as automotive electronics, consumer devices, and telecommunications.

Students must complete three of the following courses, including at least one course in group 1 and one course in group 2:

Group 1: Embedded Hardware

Electrical Engineering 360M, Digital Systems Design Using VHDL
Electrical Engineering 360R, Computer-Aided Integrated Circuit Design


Group 2: Embedded Software

Electrical Engineering 345L, Microprocessor Applications and Organization11a
Electrical Engineering 345M, Embedded and Real-Time Systems Laboratory
Electrical Engineering 345S, Real-Time Digital Signal Processing Laboratory


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Electrical Engineering 360P, Concurrent and Distributed Systems

At-Large Course in Embedded Systems

Electrical Engineering 360N, Computer Architecture

Software Engineering: Foundations

Courses in this area cover the engineering lifecycle of software systems, including requirement analysis and specification, design, construction/programming, testing, deployment, maintenance, and evolution. Area courses are intended to teach students theory, practical methods, and tools for designing, building, delivering, maintaining, and evolving software to meet stakeholder requirements.

Students must complete the following courses:

Electrical Engineering 360C, Algorithms
Electrical Engineering 360F, Software Engineering Processes


and one of the following courses:

Electrical Engineering 360P, Concurrent and Distributed Systems
Electrical Engineering 361Q, Requirements Engineering
Computer Sciences 345, Programming Languages


Software Engineering: Systems

Every software engineer must understand how software systems operate and how they can be used to solve engineering problems and deliver solutions. The courses in this area are designed to educate students about a diverse and relevant set of technologies and about the ways that technology can be used to design and build software systems.

Students must complete the following course:

Electrical Engineering 360C, Algorithms

and two of the following courses:

Computer Sciencea 347, Data Management
Computer Sciences 375, Compilers
Electrical Engineering 345L, Microprocessor Applications and Organization 11a
Electrical Engineering 345M, Embedded and Real-Time Systems Laboratory
Electrical Engineering 360P, Concurrent and Distributed Systems
Electrical Engineering 372N, Telecommunication Networks


VLSI Design

VLSI design involves the design and implementation of circuits and systems using analog and digital building blocks. A student would choose this technical area if he or she were interested in designing chips for applications such as computing, telecommunications, and signal processing. A student who is exposed to topics in VLSI design is well positioned to design state-of-the-art chips.

Students must complete two of the following courses:

Electrical Engineering 338L, Analog Integrated Circuit Design
Electrical Engineering 360R, Computer-Aided Integrated Circuit Design
Electrical Engineering 360S, Digital Integrated Circuit Design


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and one of the following courses:

Electrical Engineering 338L, Analog Integrated Circuit Design
Electrical Engineering 440, Microelectronics Fabrication Techniques
Electrical Engineering 360M, Digital Systems Design Using VHDL
Electrical Engineering 360N, Computer Architecture
Electrical Engineering 360R, Computer-Aided Integrated Circuit Design
Electrical Engineering 360S, Digital Integrated Circuit Design


_____________
11. Students who take Electrical Engineering 440 as a technical area course complete nineteen hours of technical area coursework and a total of [124] 126 hours counted toward the degree; others complete eighteen hours of technical area coursework and a total of [123] 125 hours counted toward the degree.
11a. Only students following the electrical engineering curriculum may count Electrical Engineering 345L in this technical area.
11b. Only students following the computer engineering curriculum may count Electrical Engineering 362K in this technical area.

[12. Electrical Engineering 345L may not be counted as a technical area elective by students following the computer engineering curriculum.]
[13. Electrical Engineering 362K may not be counted as a technical area elective by students following the electrical engineering curriculum.]


RATIONALE: The faculty of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department wanted to strengthen our graduate’s foundation in math and science. In order to be better prepared to adapt to technology changes over a long-term career and to be better prepared for graduate studies, the Technical Elective was changed to Math/Science Technical Elective.
Creation of Academic Enrichment Technical Area: In this technical area, a student has nine hours of electives that can be used to support his or her personal or career goals. We believe that this is important for quality control.
Clearer definition of primary and secondary technical areas: All students are required to do two technical areas. We want to make it clear that that advisor is assigned in the primary technical area and not the secondary technical area. This clarification also allows us to define the Academic enrichement technical area as a secondary technical area only.