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DOCUMENTS OF THE GENERAL FACULTY

CHANGES TO THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING CHAPTER OF
THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 2006-2008


Dean Ben Streetman of the College of Engineering has filed with the secretary of the Faculty Council the following changes to the College of Engineering chapter of the Undergraduate Catalog, 2006-2008. The faculty and the dean of the college approved the proposed changes on October 24, 2005, and November 3, 2005. The dean submitted the changes to the secretary on November 15, 2005. The secretary has classified this proposal as legislation of exclusive application and primary interest to a single college or school.

The edited proposal was received from the Office of Official Publications on April 20, 2006, and was sent to the Committee on Undergraduate Degree Program Review from the Office of the General Faculty on April 20, 2006. The committee forwarded the proposed changes to the Office of the General Faculty on May 1, 2006, recommending approval. The authority to grant final approval on behalf of the General Faculty resides with the Faculty Council.

If no objection is filed with the Office of the General Faculty by the date specified below, the legislation will be held to have been approved by the Faculty Council. If objection is filed within the prescribed period, the legislation will be presented to the Faculty Council at its next meeting. The objection, with reasons, must be signed by a member of the Faculty Council.

To be counted, a protest must be received in the Office of the General Faculty by noon on May 8, 2006.

Greninger signature
Sue Alexander Greninger, Secretary
The Faculty Council


This legislation was posted on the Faculty Council Web site (http://www.utexas.edu/faculty/council/) on May 1, 2006. Paper copies are available on request from the Office of the General Faculty, WMB 2.102, F9500.

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CHANGES TO THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING CHAPTER OF
THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 2006-2008


On page 131, under the heading GENERAL INFORMATION , in the College of Engineering chapter of the Undergraduate Catalog, 2004-2006, make the following changes:


GLOBAL ENGINEERING EDUCATION

Each semester, a growing number of students in the [college] College of Engineering pursue [their interest] interests in traveling abroad and studying in a foreign country. Practicing engineers who are undergraduates today are likely to work with foreign nationals and to be involved professionally in international projects. [Several exchange programs, with various language requirements, offer courses that may be counted toward the engineering degree.] There are several programs that allow students to take courses that will count toward their degrees. Some programs require proficiency in a foreign language, while others allow for study in English.

Students are able to earn a certificate in international engineering studies (IES) by completing the following requirements: [that include a study abroad experience and associated cultural enrichment studies.]

1. Students must apply to the IES program through the Office of Student Affairs.

2. As part of the application, the student must submit an IES program plan for approval by the Office of Student Affairs. The plan must provide for the student to complete at least three of the following requirements:
a. Language training
b. Study of local culture
c. Academic courses in engineering
d. Work experience or internship


RATIONALE:For more information, contact the Global Engineering Education Adviser, Ernest Cockrell Jr. Hall 2.200, or see [http://www.engr.utexas.edu/students/handbook/services/studyabroad.cfm] http://www.engr.utexas.edu/current/services/studyabroad.cfm.


On page 134, under the heading GENERAL INFORMATION , in the College of Engineering chapter of the Undergraduate Catalog, 2004-2006, make the following changes:


GUIDELINES FOR TRANSFER STUDENTS

1. Students who wish to transfer to the University from another college or university must apply to the Office of Admissions as described in General Information. Requirements for admission as a transfer student vary, but all transfer applicants must submit transcripts of all college and high school coursework.

2. Only courses listed in the student’s engineering degree program, or equivalent courses accepted by the department chair and approved by the dean, may be counted toward an engineering degree. A course may therefore be accepted for transfer credit but not be applicable toward an engineering degree.

3. Courses that are common to all degree programs in the College of Engineering are listed on page 144. These may be taken at any school offering courses acceptable for transfer to the University.

4. Transfer students [are expected to have completed at least one year of calculus] must have completed at least the equivalent of Mathematics 408C.

5. Completion of sequences of technical courses in the major area sometimes requires five or more semesters.


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  Therefore, most transfer students should anticipate a minimum of five semesters or the equivalent in residence at the University.

6. Transfer students with more than forty semester hours of credit in an engineering or pre-engineering program may be eligible for admission to a major sequence as explained in the following section.


RATIONALE: Requiring M408C simply states what is currently considered in the transfer admission process (i.e. Transfer students who have completed M408C or higher are much more likely to be admitted.)


On page 142, under the heading DEGREES, before the section "ABET CRITERIA" in the College of Engineering chapter of the Undergraduate Catalog, 2004-2006, make the following changes:


THE MINOR

While a minor is not required as part of any engineering degree program, the student may choose to complete a minor in a field outside the college. A student may complete only one minor. The minor consists of at least twelve semester hours in a single field, including at least six hours of upper-division coursework. Six of these hours must be completed in residence. A course to be counted toward the minor may not be taken on the pass/fail basis, unless the course is offered only on that basis. Only one course counted toward the standard requirements of the student’s degree may also be counted toward the minor.

If the minor is in a foreign language other than that used to fulfill the basic education foreign language requirement, the twelve hours may be lower-division but must include at least six hours completed in residence and at least six hours beyond course 507 or the equivalent.

All minors must be approved by the student’s major department faculty adviser and the Office of the Dean.

The College of Engineering allows the student to minor in any field outside of the college in which the University offers a major. However, prerequisites and other enrollment restrictions may prevent the student from pursuing a minor in some fields. Before planning to use specific courses to make up the minor, the student should consult the department that offers those courses.


RATIONALE: An engineering student may want to broaden her or his educational experience to include a foreign language, a concentration in economics, or a better understanding of art. He or she may want a deeper experience in mathematics, biology, or physics. He or she may want a focus on business. Any of these wants can be accomplished, at least in part, with a minor. The minor gives the student a formal approach to an expanded education as well as the formal recognition of an approved curriculum.
Additionally, a number of students wanted the opportunity to have a minor and several faculty asked why we did not have minors. As the process proceeded it was welcomed by students and faculty.




On page 142, under the heading DEGREES, in the College of Engineering chapter of the Undergraduate Catalog, 2004-2006, make the following changes:


LIBERAL EDUCATION OF ENGINEERS

Courses in social sciences, humanities, and related nontechnical areas must be an integral part of all engineering degree programs, so that engineering graduates will be aware of their social responsibilities and the effects of technology on society. All degree programs must include the following nontechnical courses.


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1. Three semester hours of [English composition] writing (Rhetoric and [Composition] Writing 306) [and at least two courses, one of which must be upper-division, certified as having a substantial writing component].

2. Three semester hours of humanities (English 316K).

3. Two courses, one of which must be upper-division, certified as having a substantial writing component.

4. Three semester hours of engineering communication (Aerospace Engineering 333T, Biomedical Engineering 333T, Chemical Engineering 333T, Civil Engineering 333T, Electrical Engineering 333T, Mechanical Engineering 333T, Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 333T, or another course approved by the department).

[5. Three semester hours of humanities (English 316K).]

[2.] 5. Six semester hours of American government (Government 310L and 312L, or equivalent courses that fulfill the legislative requirement described in chapter 1).

[3.] 6. Six semester hours of American history (History 315K and 315L, or equivalent courses that fulfill the legislative requirement described in chapter 1).

[6.] 7. Three semester hours of social science (anthropology, economics, geography, linguistics, psychology, or sociology).

[7.] 8. Three semester hours of fine arts or humanities (archaeology, architecture, art [[excluding design and studio art]], art history, [classics[including] classical civilization, [Greek, Latin,]] fine arts, humanities, music [excluding instruments and ensemble], philosophy [excluding courses in logic], or theatre and dance).


Courses used to satisfy requirements [6 and 7] 7 and 8 must fulfill the ABET accreditation criteria given above as well as the University’s basic education requirements. Lists of courses that fulfill these requirements are given below. Students preparing for the professional practice of engineering are encouraged to elect coursework in economics to fulfill requirement [6] 7 and coursework in professional ethics to fulfill requirement [7] 8.


RATIONALE: These are shown to complete the Basic Education requirements of the university without conflicting with ABET accreditation requirements.
If this proposal is approved, the same change to the fields that fulfill the fine arts/humanities requirement will be made to the section “Requirements Included in All Engineering Degree Plans,” page 144.