DEGREES

[The College of Natural Sciences offers the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I, and several bachelor of science degrees. The requirements of the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I, begin on page 422. For this degree students may major in any of the departments of the College of Liberal Arts or the College of Natural Sciences; these majors are listed on pages 5-7. The Bachelor of Arts, Plan II, a broad liberal arts honors program for outstanding students, is described on pages 281-283. Plan II emphasizes the humanities but also permits a concentration equivalent to a major in science.]

[A student may not earn more than one Bachelor of Arts degree from the University.]

[The bachelor of science degrees are listed on pages 6-7. The requirements of these degrees are given on pages 427-456.]

APPLICABILITY OF CERTAIN COURSES

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY COURSES

Physical activity (PED) courses and Kinesiology 119 may not be counted toward a degree in the [College of Natural Sciences] Jackson School. However, they are counted among courses for which the student is enrolled, and the grades are included in the grade point average.

ROTC COURSES

[ROTC units are maintained on campus by the Departments of Air Force Science, Military Science, and Naval Science.] The Departments of Air Force Science, Military Science, and Naval Science maintain ROTC units on campus. For information about each program, consult the chair of the department concerned.

Nine semester hours of coursework in air force science, military science, or naval science may be counted toward any degree in the [College of Natural Sciences] Jackson School. Such credit may be used only as electives and/or to fulfill the substantial writing component requirement, and only by students who are commissioned by the University ROTC program.

BIBLE COURSES

No more than twelve semester hours of Bible courses may be counted toward a degree.

[ADMISSION DEFICIENCIES]

[Students admitted to the University with deficiencies in high school units must remove them by the means prescribed in General Information.]

[CORRESPONDENCE AND EXTENSION COURSES]

[Credit that a University student in residence earns simultaneously by correspondence or extension from the University or elsewhere or in residence at another school will not be counted toward a degree in the College of Natural Sciences unless specifically approved in advance by the dean. No more than 30 percent of the semester hours required for any degree offered in the College of Natural Sciences may be taken by correspondence.]

[COURSES TAKEN ON THE PASS/FAIL BASIS]

[No more than sixteen semester hours taken on the pass/fail basis may be counted toward the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I. In general, only electives may be taken on the pass/fail basis. Complete rules on registration on the pass/fail basis are given in General Information.]

[COURSES IN A SINGLE FIELD]

[No more than thirty-six hours may be counted in any one subject, including the major, unless major requirements state otherwise. No more than thirty-six hours may be counted in any one college or school other than the College of Liberal Arts or the College of Natural Sciences.]

BACHELOR OF ARTS[, PLAN I] IN GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES

The Bachelor of Arts in Geological Sciences (BAGeoSci) is a classical arts and sciences degree with a strong component of liberal arts courses and a nearly equal number of courses in geological sciences, other sciences, and mathematics. Because of its breadth, the BAGeoSci is not normally considered a professional degree for a working geologist, but it is appropriate preparation for fields with a substantial geology component, such as resource management, environmental law, and certain types of business. The requirements for the Bachelor of Arts [under Plan I] in Geological Sciences are designed to give each student flexibility in the selection of courses to meet individual needs.

[SUMMARY]

[The following is a brief overview of the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I; for detailed regulations see “Degree Requirements, Specific,” pages 422-427.]

A total of 120 semester hours is required for the degree. Of the 120 hours, thirty-six must be in upper-division courses. At least sixty hours, including eighteen hours of upper-division coursework, and at least twenty-four of the last thirty hours, must be taken in residence at the University. [Provided] As long as these residence rules are met, credit may be earned by examination, by extension, by correspondence (up to 30 percent of the hours required for the degree), or, with the approval of the dean, by work transferred from another institution. [A maximum of sixteen semester hours of classroom and/or correspondence coursework may be taken on the pass/fail basis.]

The coursework to be counted toward the degree may include no more than thirty-six hours in any one subject in the College of Liberal Arts or the College of Natural Sciences; and no more than thirty-six hours in any other single college or school of the University, including the Jackson School.

No coursework to be counted toward the degree may be taken on the pass/fail basis.

Three categories of work must be completed: prescribed work[;], major and minor requirements, [including minor requirements, if any;] and electives [to provide a total of 120 semester hours]. In addition, the student must fulfill the University requirements for graduation given in chapter 1 and the requirements of the Jackson School given on page ###.

[PRESCRIBED WORK ]

[For all majors for the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I, there are four specific area requirements that make up about half of the degree program.]

[Area A (English composition and literature, writing, and foreign language): Rhetoric and Composition 306 and English 316K and two courses certified as having a substantial writing component are required. The foreign language requirement is stated in terms of proficiency; the actual number of hours varies with the language selected and previous knowledge of the language.]

[Area B (social sciences): Eighteen semester hours must be completed, including courses in four subjects. Of these eighteen hours, six hours must be in American history and six hours must be in American government, including Texas government.]



[Area C (natural sciences): Eighteen semester hours are required, including three hours of mathematics. Lists of courses that may be used to fulfill this requirement are available in the Student Division Office.]

[Area D (general culture): Six semester hours are required. Lists of courses that may be used to fulfill this requirement are available in the Student Division Office.]

[Courses in the major may be used to fulfill area requirements unless expressly prohibited. A course taken to meet the requirements of one area may not also be used to fulfill the requirements of another area. The only exception to this rule is that a course taken to fulfill another area requirement may also be used to fulfill the requirement for courses having a substantial writing component, if the course is so certified. No courses used to fulfill area requirements may be taken on the pass/fail basis.]

[MAJOR]

[Each candidate must select a major. The number of semester hours required in the major varies with the field selected. Some majors require specific courses in other subjects as well. At least eighteen hours of coursework in the major, including six hours of upper-division coursework, must be completed in residence at the University.]

[ELECTIVES]

[The remaining coursework to make the required total of 120 semester hours consists of electives. A maximum of sixteen hours of elective work may be taken on the pass/fail basis.]

[DEGREE REQUIREMENTS, SPECIFIC]

[Specific requirements for the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I, are divided into four areas: A, B, C, and D.With the dean’s approval, interdepartmental courses, courses offered by other colleges and schools of the University, and credit by examination may be used to meet these requirements; however, these courses may not be used to meet the requirements of special programs or majors without the approval of the program director or the department chair. A course taken to meet the requirements of one area may not also be used to fulfill the requirements of another area; the only exception to this rule is that a course taken to fulfill the Area A foreign language requirement or the Area B, C, or D requirement may also be counted toward the writing requirement in Area A if the course is certified as having a substantial writing component. No courses used to fulfill area requirements may be taken on the pass/fail basis.]

[In addition to the following requirements, the student must fulfill the University requirements for graduation given in chapter 1 and the requirements of the College of Natural Sciences on page 421.]

PRESCRIBED WORK

The prescribed work is divided into four areas: A, language and literature; B, social sciences; C, natural sciences; and D, general culture. Together these courses make up about half of the degree program.

A course taken to meet the requirements of one area may not also be used to fulfill the requirements of another area. The only exception to this rule is that a course taken to fulfill the Area A foreign language requirement or the Area B, C, or D requirement may also be counted toward the writing requirement in Area A if the course is certified as having a substantial writing component.

Area A, Language and Literature

English composition and literature: Rhetoric and [Composition] Writing 306 and English 316K.



Writing
: In addition to Rhetoric and [Composition] Writing 306 and English 316K, [in taking courses to fulfill other degree requirements,] each student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component. One of these courses must be upper-division. If the writing requirement is not fulfilled by courses specified for the degree, the student must fulfill it either with electives or with coursework taken in addition to the number of semester hours required for the degree. Courses used to fulfill the writing requirement may be used simultaneously to fulfill other area requirements or major and minor requirements. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.

Foreign language: Students must complete four semesters in a single foreign language.

The foreign language requirement is the attainment of a certain proficiency rather than the completion of a specified number of hours[; however, the courses taken to gain this proficiency are not electives and may not be taken on the pass/fail basis]. [Any part of the requirement may be fulfilled by credit by examination.] Students may accelerate their progress at any point in the sequence by means of credit by examination.

To achieve proficiency in a foreign language as rapidly as possible, qualified students are urged to take advantage of [the] intensive foreign language [study program] courses. Information [about this program] is available [from] in the appropriate language department. Courses used to fulfill the foreign language requirement must be language courses; literature-in-translation courses, for example, may not be counted.

Area B, Social Sciences

Eighteen semester hours are required, distributed among at least four of the fields of study listed below. [None of the courses used to fulfill Area B requirements may be taken on the pass/fail basis.Courses in anthropology, geography, linguistics, and psychology used to fulfill Area B requirements may not also be used to fulfill Area C requirements.]

1. Six semester hours in each of the following fields of study:
a. American government, including Texas government
b. American history


2. Three semester hours each from any two of the following fields of study:
a. Anthropology
b. Economics
c. Geography
d. Linguistics
e. Psychology
f. Sociology


Area C, Natural Sciences

Each student must have credit for three semester hours in a course offered by the University of Texas at Austin Department of Mathematics, excluding Mathematics 301, 316K, and 316L. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the Area C requirement or toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 without degree credit to remove their deficiency.

Fifteen additional semester hours are required, with no more than nine in any one department, from the fields of study listed below. No more than nine hours of mathematics and computer sciences combined may be included in these fifteen hours. Nine of these fifteen hours must be taken in courses in the College of Natural Sciences, items 1 through [10] 9 below, with at least six hours taken in one subject from items 1 through [8] 7; these nine hours may include no more than three hours of mathematics or computer sciences. The remaining six hours may be chosen from courses in the natural sciences listed below or from [the list of] approved alternative courses in subjects [11 through 16] 10 through 15 [that]; a list of approved courses is available [from the Student Division Office] in the Undergraduate Advising Office. Of these six hours, a maximum of three [semester] hours in courses in either the history of science or the philosophy of science may be used.



[A course listed in two or more departments may be used as a course in only one department in fulfilling requirements under Area C. Courses in anthropology, geography, linguistics, and psychology used to fulfill Area C requirements may not also be used to fulfill Area B requirements. Courses in philosophy used to fulfill Area C requirements may not also be used to fulfill Area D requirements.]

1. Astronomy
2. Biology
3. Chemistry
[4. Geological sciences]
[5.] 4. Marine science
[6.] 5. Nutrition
[7.] 6. Physical science
[8.] 7. Physics
[9.] 8. Mathematics
[10.] 9. Computer sciences
[11.] 10. Experimental psychology
[12.] 11. Physical anthropology
[13.] 12. Physical geography
[14.] 13. Philosophy (courses in logic)
[15.] 14. History of science and philosophy of science
[16.] 15. Other science courses approved by the dean


[Students should confer with the staff in their advising center or the Student Division Office to determine which courses are included in items 11 through 16.]

Students, counselors, and advisers are urged to make careful selection of Area C courses in order to develop a meaningful pattern and a coherent sequence.

Area D, General Culture

Six semester hours from the [fields of study] areas listed below. Three of these six hours must be chosen from subarea 1, 2, 3, or 4 (excluding courses in logic).

A student who uses Greek or Latin to meet the Area A foreign language requirement may use additional coursework in the same language to meet the Area D requirement, but only courses beyond the fourth semester proficiency level may be used.

1. Architecture
2. Classics, including classical civilization, Greek, Latin
3. Fine arts, including art history, design, ensemble, fine arts, instruments, music, studio art, theatre and dance, visual art studies
4. Philosophy
5. Approved interdisciplinary courses including, but not restricted to, those in programs of special concentration cutting across specific departments, schools, or colleges. Lists of approved courses are available in the [advising centers and the Student Division Office] Undergraduate Advising Office.


[SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS ]

[Elective Requirements and Limitations]

[In addition to the area requirements given above and the major requirements given below, the student must take enough elective coursework to complete the 120 semester hours required for the degree. These 120 hours may include no more than twelve hours of Bible; nine hours of air force science, military science, or naval science; sixteen hours taken on the pass/fail basis; thirty-six hours in any one subject offered in the College of Natural Sciencesor the College of Liberal Arts, unless major requirements state otherwise; and thirty-six hours in courses offered in any other single college or school of the University.]

[Minimum Scholastic Requirements]


[The student must earn a grade point average of at least 2.00 in all courses taken at the University of Texas at Austin (including credit by examination, correspondence, and extension) for which a grade or symbol other than Q, W, X, or CR is recorded; in addition, the student must earn a grade point average of at least 2.00 in courses taken at the University and counted toward the major requirement.]

[The student should also refer to the description of his or her major program in the section “Majors and Minors” below, since some majors include higher minimum scholastic requirements.]

[For more information about grades and the grade point average, see General Information.]

[CONCENTRATIONS]

[Within the general requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Arts and the requirements of the major, a student may also complete a concentration in cultural studies; European studies; science, technology, and society; or wom­en’s and gender studies. These concentrations, administered by the College of Liberal Arts, are described on pages 271-272. Students may also pursue a concentration in actuarial studies, administered by the Department of Mathematics and described on page 488.]

[MAJORS AND MINORS ]

[Major requirements. The Bachelor of Arts, Plan I, requires the completion of all requirements for one major. Requirements for majors offered by the College of Natural Sciences are given below; those for majors offered by the College of Liberal Arts are given in chapter 8.]

[The major subject is not shown on the diploma. It is not possible for a student to receive a second Bachelor of Arts degree from the University.]

[Advising of majors. A student who has chosen a major is advised in the advising center for his or her major before registration each semester. Students who have not chosen a major must be advised in the Student Division Office, College of Natural Sciences. For matters concerning degree requirements, specific academic problems, petitions, and academic advice in general, the student should consult his or her advising center or the Student Division Office, Will C. Hogg 2.112.]

[Hour requirements for the major. A major consists of at least twenty-one but no more than forty-two semester hours, with at least twelve hours in upper-division courses. Of these twelve semester hours, six must be taken in residence. These restrictions exist in the context of the general residence requirement for the major of eighteen semester hours.]

[Unless otherwise indicated, a course taken to fulfill the requirements under “Prescribed Work,” pages 422-424, may also be counted toward fulfillment of the major requirements.]

[A student who earns credit by examination with a grade of C or better will be given the appropriate grade and degree credit, including hours required in the major.]

[Minors. Most departments require completion of a minor to accompany the major. These requirements, if any, are given below.]

[Geological Sciences] THE MAJOR AND MINOR

[Geological sciences majors must make a grade of at least C in each semester of each course used to fulfill the requirements for the degree. They may not enroll in any geological sciences course more than twice without written consent of the undergraduate adviser of the department.]

With the exception of courses that fulfill the Area A writing requirement, a course taken to fulfill the requirements under “Prescribed Work” above may not also be counted toward fulfillment of the major and minor requirements.

Residence requirements for the major. At least eighteen semester hours of coursework in geological sciences, including six hours of upper-division coursework, must be completed in residence at the University.

[Major:] Course requirements for the major. Geological Sciences 401 or 303 or 312K, 404C or 405, 416K, 416M, 420K, 422K, 428, and enough additional [approved] upper-division coursework in geological sciences to make a total of thirty-two semester hours[.2]; six semester hours in biology; Chemistry 301 and 302; and three semester hours in physics.

Minor [for geological sciences majors:]. Twelve semester hours, of which at least six must be in upper-division coursework, in any one of the following disciplines: anthropology, astronomy, biology, business, computer sciences, chemistry, education, engineering, geography, mathematics, and physics. Other disciplines may be chosen with written approval of the [chair of the Department of Geological Sciences] undergraduate adviser.

ELECTIVES

In addition to the prescribed work and the major and minor, the student must take enough elective coursework to complete the 120 semester hours required for the degree. These 120 hours may include no more than twelve semester hours of Bible and no more than nine hours of air force science, military science, or naval science.

MINIMUM SCHOLASTIC REQUIREMENTS

The student must earn a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.00 in all courses taken at the University of Texas at Austin (including credit by examination, correspondence, and extension) for which a grade or symbol other than Q, W, X, or CR is recorded. In addition, the student must earn a grade point average of at least 2.00 in geological sciences courses taken at the University and counted toward the major requirement.

The student must earn a grade of at least C in each semester of each course used to fulfill any of the requirements for the degree.

For more information about grades and the grade point average, see General Information.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES

The Bachelor of Science in Geological Sciences serves as a professional degree for students planning careers as geologists, geophysicists, or teachers, as well as for those planning to pursue graduate work in the geosciences [and related areas] or a profession such as law or business. [Employment opportunities for students with this degree are dominated by] Careers are available in the petroleum and related energy industries, [but include the gamut of jobs that relate knowledge of the earth to resources, the environment, and human use of raw materials] resource evaluation, mineral exploration, geologic hazard monitoring, environmental control and reclamation, building foundation evaluation, groundwater contamination studies, soil testing, regional planning, watershed management, climate modeling, and college or secondary school teaching. [When finite resources are in increasing demand, professional geologists trained to seek and develop raw materials serve a vital role in industrial society. Professional employment is also available in state and federal agencies, with consulting firms, and with service companies subsidiary to the energy and mineral industries. Careers include such areas as resource evaluation, environmental control, reclamation concerns, building foundation evaluation, groundwater contamination studies, soil testing, regional planning, watershed management, and mineral exploitation.] Graduates may also work in state or federal agencies, in universities or museums, with consulting firms, or with service companies to the energy and mineral industries.

Students seeking the Bachelor of Science in Geological Sciences degree must choose one of four options--I, general geology; II, geophysics; III, hydrogeology/environmental geology[,]; or IV, teaching.

PRESCRIBED WORK COMMON TO ALL OPTIONS

1. Rhetoric and [Composition] Writing 306 and English 316K. In addition, in taking courses to fulfill other degree requirements, the studentmust complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component; one of these courses must be upper-division. If the writing requirement is not fulfilled by courses specified for the degree, the student must fulfill it either with electives or with coursework taken in addition to the number of semester hours required for the degree. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.

2. Courses 506 and 507 (or the equivalent) in a single foreign language, and a three-semester-hour course in the same language for which 507 or the equivalent is a prerequisite; or as much of this coursework as required by the student’s score on the appropriate language placement test. [Students in the teaching option are exempt from this requirement.]
For students who enter the University with fewer than two high school units in a single foreign language, the first two semesters in a language may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree.

3. Six semester hours of American government, including Texas government.

4. Six semester hours of American history.

5. Three semester hours of coursework in economics, upper-division coursework in anthropology, or upper-division coursework in geography.

6. Three semester hours in architecture, art (including art history, design, studio art, visual art studies), classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts, music (including music, instruments, ensemble), philosophy (excluding courses in logic), or theatre and dance.

7. Thirty-six semester hours of upper-division coursework must be completed in residence at the University. For students in options I, II, and III, at least eighteen of these hours must be in geological sciences; for students in option IV, at least twelve hours must be in geological sciences. For all students, at least twelve of the thirty-six hours must be outside geological sciences.


ADDITIONAL PRESCRIBED WORK FOR EACH OPTION

OPTION I: GENERAL GEOLOGY

8. Mathematics 408C and 408D, or 408K, 408L, and 408M. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 without degree credit to remove their deficiency.

9. Physics 301, 101L, 316, and 116L; or Physics 303K, 103M, 303L, and 103N.

10. Six semester hours of biology. Biology [211, 212, and 213] 311C and 311D are suggested.

11. Chemistry 301, 302, and 204.

12. Geological Sciences 401 or 303 or 312K, 404C or 405, 416K, 416M, 420K, 422K, 426P, 428, 346C, 660 (completed in residence), 468K, and enough additional approved upper-division coursework in geological sciences to make a total of forty-nine semester hours.[10]

13. Nine semester hours chosen from [the following courses: Aerospace Engineering 201, Civil Engineering 319F, 341, 357, 374K, Engineering Mechanics 311M, 319, Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 323, 424, 362, 365, 368, 369, and any course in aerospace engineering, architectural engineering, civil engineering, engineering mechanics, or mechanical engineering for which Engineering Mechanics 311M, 319, or Mathematics 427L is a prerequisite; any upper-division astronomy course for which Physics 316 and 116L are prerequisites; Biology 406D, 322 and 122L, 324 and 124L, 325, 126L, 226R, 226S, 226T, 327 and 127L, 328 and 128L, 448L, 349, 456L, 357, 262 and 262L, 363, 365R, 365S, 370, 373 and 373L, and 478L; Chemical Engineering 317, 322, and 353; Chemistry 210C, 310M, 310N, 353 and 153K, and any upper-division chemistry course for which Chemistry 310N or 353 is a prerequisite; Computer Sciences 303E, 313E, 323E, 324E, 326E, 327E, 329E; Geography 334, 334C, 334K, 335C, 335K, 339, 356, 360L, 462K, and 366K; Geological Sciences 325K; Marine Science 440, 348, 352C, 354, 354C, and 354F; any upper-division mathematics course for which Mathematics 408D or the equivalent is a prerequisite; and any upper-division physics course except Physics 341.] a list of approved courses in aerospace engineering, architectural engineering, astronomy, biology, chemical engineering, chemistry, civil engineering, computer sciences, engineering mechanics, geography, marine science, mathematics, mechanical engineering, petroleum and geosystems engineering, and physics. Geological Sciences 325K may also be counted toward requirement 13.

This requirement is intended to function as an unspecified minor. Courses used to fulfill the requirement do not have to be taken in the same [department] field of study, but they should form a self-reinforcing sequence related to geological sciences. Courses [not listed above] not on the list of approved courses will be considered upon petition to the undergraduate adviser.

14. Enough additional coursework[, outside geological sciences,] to make a total of 126 semester hours.


OPTION II: GEOPHYSICS

8. Mathematics 408C and 408D, or 408K, 408L, and 408M; 427K; and 427L. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 without degree credit to remove their deficiency.

9. Physics 301, 101L, 315, 115L, 316, and 116L.

10. Computer Sciences 303E.

11. Chemistry 301 and 302.

12. Geological Sciences 401 or 303 or 312K, 416K, 416M, 420K, 325K, 428, 354, 660 (completed in residence) or [an approved six-semester-hour geophysics field camp] 679G, 465K, and six additional approved hours of upper-division coursework ingeological sciences. (Geological Sciences 365N is recommended.)

13. Nine semester hours chosen from [the following courses: Aerospace Engineering 366K, Astronomy 352K, 353, Chemistry 353, Civil Engineering 319F, 341, 357, 374K, Computer Sciences 303E, 313E, 323E, 324E, 326E, 327E, Electrical Engineering 411, 351K, 351L, 351M, Geography 335C, Mathematics 328K, 333L, 340L, 343K, 361, 361K, 362K, 364K, 364L, 365C, 365D, 367K, 367L, 368K, 372, 373K, 373L, 374, 374K, 378K, Mechanical Engineering 326, Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 322K, 323, 424, 368, Physics 333, 336K, 336L, 338K, 352K, 453, 362K, 362L, 369, 373, 474, 375P, and 375S.] a list of approved courses in aerospace engineering, astronomy, chemistry, civil engineering, computer sciences, electrical engineering, geography, mathematics, mechanical engineering, petroleum and geosystems engineering, and physics.

This requirement is intended to function as an unspecified minor. Courses used to fulfill the requirement do not have to be taken in the same [department] field of study, but they should form a self-reinforcing sequence related to geological sciences. [Courses not listed above will be considered upon petition to the undergraduate adviser. If the student chooses computer sciences courses to fulfill this requirement, these courses may also be counted toward a certificate in the elements of computing. The Elements of Computing Program is described on page 415.] Courses not on the list of approved courses will be considered upon petition to the undergraduate adviser.

14. Enough additional coursework to make a total of 126 semester hours.


OPTION III: HYDROGEOLOGY/ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY

8. Mathematics 408C and 408D, or 408K, 408L, and 408M; and 427K. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 without degree credit to remove their deficiency.

9. Physics 301, 101L, 316, and 116L; or Physics 303K, 103M, 303L, and 103N.

10. Chemistry 301, 302, and 204.

11. Biology [211] 311C.

12. Geological Sciences 401 or 303 or 312K, 416K, 416M, 420K, 428, 346C, [660 or 679J,] 476K, and 476M[, and]. Also required is one of the following: Geological Sciences 660A and 660B, or 376L and 660B, or 679J. The student must also complete six additional [approved] semester hours of upper-division coursework in geological sciences. [Geological Sciences 376L is strongly recommended.]

13. Nine semester hours chosen from [the following courses: Biology 212 and 213, Chemistry 310M, 353, Civil Engineering 311S, 319F, 341, 357, 374K, Geography 334K, 335C, Marine Science 440, Mathematics 427L, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 326, Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 421K, 322K, 424, 326, and 368.] a list of approved courses in biology, chemistry, civil engineering, geography, marine science, mathematics, mechanical engineering, and petroleum and geosystems engineering.

This requirement is intended to function as an unspecified minor. Courses used to fulfill the requirement do not have to be taken in the same [department] field of study, but they should form a self-reinforcing sequence related to geological sciences. Courses not [listed above] on the list of approved courses will be considered upon petition to the undergraduate adviser.

14. Enough additional coursework to make a total of 126 semester hours.


OPTION IV: TEACHING

This option is designed to fulfill the course requirements for composite science certification as a middle grades or secondary school teacher in Texas with geological sciences as the primary teaching field; however, completion of the course requirements does not guarantee the student’s certification. Composite certification requires twenty-four semester hours of coursework in the primary field, twelve hours in a second field, and six hours each in two additional fields.

To graduate and be recommended for certification, the student must have a cumulative University grade point average of at least 2.50 and must pass the final teaching portfolio review. For information about the teaching portfolio review and additional certification requirements, consult the UTeach-Natural Sciences academic adviser.

8. In place of requirement 2 above, either two years of high school coursework in a single foreign language or course 506 (or the equivalent) in a foreign language.

9. To fulfill requirement 5 above, students in the teaching option may complete three semester hours of lower-division or upper-division coursework in anthropology, economics, geography, linguistics, psychology, or sociology.

10. Mathematics 408C. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 without degree credit to remove their deficiency.

11. To fulfill requirement 6 above, students must complete History 329U or Philosophy 329U.

12. Geological Sciences 401 or 303 or 312K, 404C or 405, 416K, 416M, 420K or 320L, 335, and enough additional upper-division coursework in geological sciences to make a total of at least twenty-eight semester hours.

13. Nine semester hours chosen from [the following courses: Biology 212 and 213, Chemistry 310M, 353, Civil Engineering 311S, 319F, 341, 357, 374K, Geography 334K, 335C, Marine Science 440, Mathematics 427L, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 326, Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 421K, 322K, 424, 326, and 368.] a list of approved courses in biology, chemistry, civil engineering, geography, marine science, mathematics, mechanical engineering, and petroleum and geosystems engineering.
a. Biology [211, 212, and either 213 or 214] 311C and 311D.
b. Chemistry 301 and 302.
c. Physics 302K, 102M, 302L, and 102N; or 301, 101L, 316, and 116L; or an equivalent sequence.
d. Enough additional approved coursework in biology, chemistry, or physics to provide the required twelve hours in a second field.


14. Biology 337 (Topic: Research Methods--UTeach), Chemistry 368 (Topic: Research Methods--UTeach), or Physics 341 (Topic: Research Methods--UTeach).

15. Astronomy 303, 307, or 367M; and Marine Science 307.

16. Eighteen semester hours of professional development coursework, with a grade of at least C in each course: Curriculum and Instruction 650S, UTeach-Natural Sciences 101, 110, 350, 355, 360, 170.

17. Students seeking middle grades certification must complete the following courses, with a grade of at least C in each course: Educational Psychology 363M (Topic 3: Adolescent Development), or Psychology 301 and 304; and Curriculum and Instruction 371 (Topic 10: Secondary School Reading in the Content Subjects).

18. Enough additional coursework to make a total of 128 semester hours.



[SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS]

[The student must fulfill the University-wide graduation requirements given on pages 18-19 and the college requirements given on page 421. He or she must also make a grade of at least C in each course counted toward the degree. Geological sciences majors may not repeat any geological sciences course more than once without written consent of the undergraduate adviser.]

[To graduate and be recommended for certification, students who follow the teaching option must have a University grade point average of at least 2.50. They must earn a grade of at least C in each of the professional development courses listed in requirement 16, and must pass the final teaching portfolio review; those seeking middle grades certification must also earn a grade of at least C in each of the courses listed in requirement 17. For information about the portfolio review and additional teacher certification requirements, consult the UTeach-Natural Sciences academic adviser.]

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN GEOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING AND HYDROGEOLOGY

Geosystems engineers and hydrogeologists are concerned with the development and use of engineering approaches in the management of natural resources from the earth’s surface and subsurface, environmental restoration of subsurface sites, and other processes related to the earth sciences. This degree program, offered [jointly by] under a partnership between the College of Engineering and the [College of Natural Sciences] Jackson School, is designed to teach students the geological and engineering principles needed to solve subsurface resource development and environmental problems. The curriculum includes a fundamental sequence of engineering and geological sciences courses in such areas as multiphase fluid flow, physical and chemical hydrology, heat and mass transfer, field methods, and engineering design. This interdisciplinary systems approach, combining engineering and geological sciences, is increasingly required to address complex real-world problems such as characterization and remediation of aquifers. The degree program is designed to prepare graduates for employment with environmental, water resource management, and energy companies in addition to many government agencies. Better-qualified graduates of the program may pursue graduate study in subsurface environmental engineering, petroleum engineering, geology, and other related fields.

The objective of the degree program is to prepare graduates for successful careers in subsurface environmental engineering, oil and gas production and services, and similar fields. Graduates are expected to understand the fundamental principles of science and engineering behind the technology of geosystems engineering and hydrogeology so that their education will not become outdated and so that they will be capable of self-instruction after graduation. They should also be prepared to serve society by applying the ideals of ethical behavior, professionalism, and environmentally responsible stewardship of natural resources.

Containing the following elements, the technical curriculum provides both breadth and depth in a range of topics.


  • A combination of college-level mathematics and basic sciences (some with experimental work) that includes mathematics through differential equations, probability and statistics, physics, chemistry, and geology.

  • Basic engineering and geologic topics that develop a working knowledge of fluid mechanics, strength of materials, transport phenomena, material properties, phase behavior, and thermodynamics.
  • Engineering and geosciences topics that develop competence in characterization and evaluation of subsurface geological formations and their resources using geoscientific and engineering methods, including field methods; design and analysis of systems for producing, injecting, and handling fluids; application of hydrogeologic and reservoir engineering principles and practices for water and energy resource development and management; contamination evaluation and remediation methods for hydrologic resources; and use of project economics and resource valuation methods for design and decision making under conditions of risk and uncertainty.
  • A major capstone design experience that prepares students for engineering and hydro­geologic practice, based on the knowledge and skills acquired in earlier coursework and incorporating engineering and geological standards and realistic constraints.
  • A general education component that complements the technical content of the curriculum.
CURRICULUM

Course requirements are divided into three categories: basic sequence courses, major sequence courses, and other required courses. Enrollment in major sequence courses is restricted to students who have received credit for all of the basic sequence courses and have been admitted to the major sequence by the College of Engineering Admissions Committee. (Requirements for admission to a major sequence are given on pages 134-135.) Enrollment in other required courses is not restricted by completion of the basic sequence.

Courses used to fulfill technical and nontechnical elective requirements must be approved by the petroleum and geosystems engineering faculty and the geological sciences faculty before the student enrolls in them. Courses that fulfill the social science and fine arts/humanities requirements are listed on pages 142-143.

Students must fulfill the foreign language requirement given on page 143. They must also remove any admission deficiencies in mathematics as described in General Information.

COURSES

SEMESTER
 HOURS


Basic Sequence Courses
  Chemistry 301, 302, Engineering Mechanics 306, 319, Geological Sciences 312K, 416K, 416M, 420K, Mathematics 408C, 408D, 427K, Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering [310,] 210, 312, 322K, 333T, Physics 303K, 303L, 103M, 103N, Rhetoric and [Composition] Writing 306
[59] 61

Major Sequence Courses

Civil Engineering 357, [English 316K,] Geological Sciences 428, 468K, 476K, 376L, 376S, Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering [322K, 323,] 323K, 323L, 323M, 424, 326, [331,] 365, 368, [373K,] 373L
[52] 46

Other Required Courses

  English 316K
3
  American government, including Texas government
6
  American history
6
  Approved fine arts or humanities elective
3
  Approved social science elective
3
 
MINIMUM REQUIRED
[129] 128


[SUGGESTED ARRANGEMENT OF COURSES]

[First Year -- Fall Semester]

[COURSES]

[SEMESTER
 HOURS
]


  [CH 301, Principles of Chemistry I
3]
  [GEO 312K, Geology of Engineering
3]
  [M 408C, Differential and Integral Calculus
4]
  [RHE 306, Rhetoric and Composition
3]
  [Approved social science elective
3]
 
[TOTAL
16]


[First Year -- Spring Semester]

[COURSES]

[SEMESTER
 HOURS
]


  [CH 302, Principles of Chemistry II
3]
  [GEO 416M, Sedimentary Rocks
4]
  [M 408D, Sequences, Series, and Multivariable Calculus
4]
  [PHY 303K, Engineering Physics I
3]
  [PHY 103M, Laboratory for Physics303K
1]
  [American government
3]
 
[TOTAL
18]


[Second Year -- Fall Semester]

[COURSES]

[SEMESTER
 HOURS
]


  [E M 306, Statics
3]
  [GEO 416K, Earth Materials
4]
  [M 427K, Advanced Calculus for Applications I
4]
  [PGE 310, Formulation and Solution of Geosystems Engineering Problems
3]
  [American history
3]
 
[TOTAL
17]


[Second Year -- Spring Semester]

[COURSES]

[SEMESTER
 HOURS
]


  [E M 319, Mechanics of Solids
3]
  [GEO 420K, Introduction to Field and Stratigraphic Methods
4]
  [PGE 312, Physical and Chemical Behavior of Fluids I
3]
  [PGE 333T, Engineering Communication
3]
  [PHY 303L, Engineering Physics II
3]
  [PHY 103N, Laboratory for Physics 303L
1]
 
[TOTAL
17]


[Third Year -- Fall Semester]

[COURSES]

[SEMESTER
 HOURS
]


  [GEO 476K, Groundwater Hydrology
4]
  [PGE 322K, Transport Phenomena in Geosystems
3]
  [PGE 424, Petrophysics
4]
  [PGE 326, Thermodynamics and Phase Behavior
3]
  [American history
3]
 
[TOTAL
17]


[Third Year -- Spring Semester]

[COURSES]

[SEMESTER
 HOURS
]


  [C E 357, Geotechnical Engineering
3]
  [E 316K, Masterworks of Literature
3]
  [PGE 323, Fluid Flow through Permeable Media
3]
  [PGE 365, Resource Economics and Valuation
3]
  [American government
3]
 
[TOTAL
15]


[Third Year -- Summer Session]

[COURSES]

[SEMESTER
 HOURS
]


  [GEO 376L, Field Methods in Groundwater Hydrology
3]
 
[TOTAL
3]


[Fourth Year -- Fall Semester]

[COURSES]

[SEMESTER
 HOURS
]


  [GEO 428, Structural Geology
4]
  [GEO 376S, Physical Hydrology
3]
  [PGE 331, Fundamentals of Reservoir Engineering
3]
  [PGE 368, Fundamentals of Well Logging
3]
  [PGE 373K, Geosystems Engineering Design and Analysis I
3]
 
[TOTAL
16]


[Fourth Year -- Spring Semester]

[COURSES]

[SEMESTER
 HOURS
]


  [GEO 468K, Geophysics for Geological Sciences Majors
4]
  [GEO 476M, Chemical Hydrogeology
4]
  [PGE 370, Fundamentals of Subsurface Environmental Engineering
3]
  [PGE 373L, Geosystems Engineering Design and Analysis II
3]
  [Approved fine arts/humanities elective
3]
 
[TOTAL
17]


A suggested arrangement of courses by semester is given on page 181.


[2. “Approved upper-division coursework in geological sciences” includes all upper-division University geological sciences courses except those with descriptions containing the statement that they may not be counted toward a geological sciences degree. A student who wishes to use transfer credit for unspecified advanced hours in geological sciences to fulfill this requirement must submit a petition to the undergraduate adviser for approval.]

[10. “Approved upper-division coursework in geological sciences” includes all upper-division University geological sciences courses except those with descriptions containing the statement that they may not be counted toward a geological sciences degree. A student who wishes to use transfer credit for unspecified advanced hours in geological sciences to fulfill this requirement must submit a petition to the undergraduate adviser for approval.]


GENERAL INFORMATION

ADMISSION AND REGISTRATION

ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

DEGREES