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4739


DOCUMENTS OF THE GENERAL FACULTY

CHANGES IN REQUIREMENTS FOR THE
BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE WITH A MAJOR IN
LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES IN
THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS CHAPTER OF
THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2006-2008


Dean Richard Lariviere of the College of Liberal Arts has filed with the secretary of the Faculty Council the following changes to the Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in Latin American studies in the College of Liberal Arts of the Undergraduate Catalog, 2006-2008. The faculty of the school and the dean approved the proposed changes on November 4, 2005. The dean submitted the changes to the secretary on November 21, 2005. The secretary has classified this proposal as legislation of exclusive application and primary interest to a single college or school.

The edited proposal was received from the Office of Official Publications on April 10, 2006, and was sent to the Committee on Undergraduate Degree Program Review from the Office of the General Faculty on April 11, 2006. The committee forwarded the proposed changes to the Office of the General Faculty on May 1, 2006, recommending approval. The authority to grant final approval on behalf of the General Faculty resides with the Faculty Council.

If no objection is filed with the Office of the General Faculty by the date specified below, the legislation will be held to have been approved by the Faculty Council. If objection is filed within the prescribed period, the legislation will be presented to the Faculty Council at its next meeting. The objection, with reasons, must be signed by a member of the Faculty Council.

To be counted, a protest must be received in the Office of the General Faculty by noon on May 1, 2006.

Greninger signature
Sue Alexander Greninger, Secretary
The Faculty Council


This legislation was posted on the Faculty Council Web site (http://www.utexas.edu/faculty/council/) on XXX, 2006. Paper copies are available on request from the Office of the General Faculty, WMB 2.102, F9500.

4740


CHANGES IN REQUIREMENTS FOR THE
BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE WITH A MAJOR IN
LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES IN
THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS CHAPTER OF
THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2006-2008


On pages 277-278, under the heading DEGREES, in the MAJORS AND MINORS subsection in the College of Liberal Arts chapter of the Undergraduate Catalog, 2004-2006, make the following changes:


Latin American Studies

All Latin American studies majors must take the following five core courses:

1. Latin American Studies 301.

2. Geography 319 or any other geography course cross-listed with Latin American studies, or Economics 355.

3. Government 328L.

4. History 346K or another upper-division history course on colonial Latin America (before 1810).

5. History 346L or another upper-division history course on either modern Latin America (since 1810) or an individual Latin American nation since independence.


A list of courses that will fulfill requirements 4 and 5 is available in the Latin American studies advising office. Spanish 322K or Portuguese 341 may be substituted for either History 346K or 346L, but not for both.

In addition, all Latin American studies majors must take twenty-one semester hours in a single discipline chosen from the following: anthropology, art history, business, economics, geography, government, history, [Latin American literature and civilization,] sociology, Portuguese, or Spanish. A concentration in another area may be organized with the approval of the Undergraduate Program Committee of the Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies. The twenty-one hours must include at least twelve hours of Latin American content coursework and at least twelve hours of upper-division coursework.

Students must complete the equivalent of at least two years in Spanish or Portuguese. Credit used to fulfill this requirement may also be used to fulfill the foreign language requirement for the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I.


RATIONALE: To streamline the major. The Latin American literature and civilization discipline is redundant with the Spanish and Portuguese disciplines and in practice is seldom (or never) used by majors.