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DOCUMENTS OF THE GENERAL FACULTY

CHANGES TO ALLOW UNDERGRADUATE FOREIGN LANGUAGE COURSES TO COUNT TOWARD THE JD DEGREE IN THE DEGREES CHAPTER OF THE LAW SCHOOL CATALOG 2006-2008


Dean William C. Powers of the School of Law has filed with the secretary of the Faculty Council the following to allow undergraduate foreign language courses to count toward the JD degree in the Doctor of Jurisprudence section of The Law School Catalog, 2006-2008. The faculty of the school approved the proposed changes on May 5, 2004. The dean approved the proposed changes on May 7, 2004, and submitted the changes to the secretary on August 17, 2005. The secretary has classified this proposal as legislation of exclusive application and primary interest to a single college or school.

The edited proposal was received from the Office of Official Publications on October 12, 2005, and was sent to the Committee on Undergraduate Degree Program Review from the Office of the General Faculty on October 13, 2005. The committee forwarded the proposed changes to the Office of the General Faculty on October 17, 2005, recommending approval. The authority to grant final approval on behalf of the General Faculty resides with the Faculty Council.

If no objection is filed with the Office of the General Faculty by the date specified below, the legislation will be held to have been approved by the Faculty Council. If objection is filed within the prescribed period, the legislation will be presented to the Faculty Council at its next meeting. The objection, with reasons, must be signed by a member of the Faculty Council.

To be counted, a protest must be received in the Office of the General Faculty by noon on October 28, 2005.

<signed>

Sue Alexander Greninger, Secretary
The Faculty Council



This legislation was posted on the Faculty Council Web site (http://www.utexas.edu/faculty/council/) on October 19, 2005. Paper copies are available on request from the Office of the General Faculty, WMB 2.102, F9500.

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CHANGES TO ALLOW UNDERGRADUATE FOREIGN LANGUAGE COURSES TO COUNT TOWARD THE JD DEGREE IN THE DEGREES CHAPTER OF THE LAW SCHOOL CATALOG 2006-2008


On page 53 of The Law School Catalog 2004-2006, under the Doctor of Jurisprudence section, make the following changes.


To qualify for the Doctor of Jurisprudence (JD) degree, a student must meet the following requirements:

1. The student must have completed a period of resident study equivalent to at least three academic years.

2. The student must have taken (and, if failed, repeated once) all courses required by the faculty of the School of Law at the time of the student’s initial enrollment, except those that have been removed from the list of required courses since the student’s initial enrollment. The student must pass at least one seminar as described in the section “Seminars” below.

3. Eighty-six semester hours are required for graduation. With the permission of the dean, a student may enroll in a course in another school or college of the University. To count toward graduation from the School of Law, the course [must be a graduate course and] must be related to a course of study offered in the School of Law. If the course is in a foreign language, it may be either undergraduate or graduate; in all other fields, only graduate courses may be counted. (Except in the College of Pharmacy and the School of Law, graduate courses at the University are identified by numbers with “8” or “9” as the second digit.) No more than [six] twelve semester hours of such work may be counted.

Students who complete undergraduate foreign language courses may apply one credit hour toward the JD degree per two and a half credit hours earned.

4. The student must have a grade point average of at least 1.90 on all work taken in the School of Law.


RATIONALE:

1. To encourage students to take an interdisciplinary approach to the study of law, it is recommended that the number of non-law credits that students can apply to the JD degree be increased from six to twelve.

2. Due to the growing importance of international law, students must be bi- or multi-lingual. To learn a foreign language, most students must begin with undergraduate language courses. Since such courses are related to the student’s future practice, it is recommended that such credit be allowed to apply to the JD degree but at a pro rated amount.