View in portable document format.

4578


DOCUMENTS OF THE GENERAL FACULTY

CHANGES TO THE MATHEMATICS PROGRAM
IN THE COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES CHAPTER OF
THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 2006-2008



Dean Mary Ann Rankin of the College of Natural Sciences has filed with the secretary of the Faculty Council proposed changes to the mathematics program in the College of Natural Sciences chapter in The Undergraduate Catalog, 2006-2008. The faculty of the college approved the changes on May 16, 2005. The dean approved the proposed changes on December 1, 2005, and submitted them to the secretary on December 12, 2005. The secretary has classified this proposal as legislation of exclusive application and primary interest to a single college or school.

The edited proposal was received from the Office of Official Publications on March 13, 2006, and was sent to the Committee on Undergraduate Degree Program Review from the Office of the General Faculty on March 30, 2006. The committee forwarded the proposed changes to the Office of the General Faculty on April 10, 2006, recommending approval. The authority to grant final approval on behalf of the General Faculty resides with the Faculty Council.

If no objection is filed with the Office of the General Faculty by the date specified below, the legislation will be held to have been approved by the Faculty Council. If an objection is filed within the prescribed period, the legislation will be presented to the Faculty Council at its next meeting. The objection, with reasons, must be signed by a member of the Faculty Council.

To be counted, a protest must be received in the Office of the General Faculty by noon on April 21, 2006.

Greninger signature

Sue Alexander Greninger, Secretary
The Faculty Council



This legislation was posted on the Faculty Council Web site (http://www.utexas.edu/faculty/council/) on April 13, 2006. Paper copies are available on request from the Office of the General Faculty, WMB 2.102, F9500.

4579


CHANGES TO THE MATHEMATICS PROGRAM
IN THE COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES CHAPTER OF
THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 2006-2008



On page 427, under the heading DEGREES, in the BACHELOR OF ARTS, PLAN I section in the College of Natural Sciences chapter of The Undergraduate Catalog, 2004-2006, make the following changes:


Mathematics

Undergraduates seeking a Bachelor of Arts degree in mathematics must choose either the standard option or the middle grades or secondary school teaching option.

Major, standard option: At least twenty-four semester hours of upper-division coursework in mathematics. Mathematics 301, 302, 303D, 305G, and equivalent courses may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. The student must earn a grade of at least C in Mathematics 408C and 408D and in each mathematics course used to fulfill the major requirement.

The student must complete the following:

1. Mathematics 408C and 408D.

2. Mathematics 340L or 341.

3. Mathematics 328K, 343K, or 373K.

4. Mathematics 361K or 365C.

5. Mathematics 362K.

6. At least one course chosen from the following: Mathematics 333L, 339J, [339U,] 343L, 343M, 344K, 348, 358K, 361, 367K, 368K, 372K, 474M, 376C, 378K. This requirement is intended to broaden the student’s training.


Major, mathematics for middle grades and secondary school teaching options: At least twenty-four semester hours of upper-division coursework in mathematics. Mathematics 301, 302, 303D, 305G, and equivalent courses may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. The student must earn a grade of at least C in Mathematics 408C and 408D and in each mathematics course used to fulfill the major requirement.

The middle grades and secondary school teaching options are designed to give students the mathematical background appropriate for teaching middle grades and secondary school mathematics, but students must meet additional requirements, including grade point average requirements, to obtain certification. Lists of the combined requirements of the UTeach-Natural Sciences certification programs and these options are available from the UTeach-Natural Sciences academic adviser. The UTeach-Natural Sciences program is described on pages 414-415.

The student must complete the following:

1. Mathematics 408C and 408D.

2. Mathematics 340L or 341.

3. Mathematics 315C, 325K, 333L, 358K, and 362K.

4. Mathematics 326K or 360M or Science 360 (Topic: Math Domain). Students seeking middle grades mathematics certification must complete Mathematics 326K.

5. Mathematics 361K or 365C .

6. 328K, 343K, or 373K .


4580


RATIONALE: M 339J is now a prerequisite for M 339&. M 343M is a new course in applied number theory that is different in content bus similar in spirit to M 343L.

This requirement is intended to make sure students in this option take a three hour upper division math course that explicitly focuses on acquiring depth in mathematics relevant to secondary or middle grades teaching. When the requirement was written, the only two courses fitting that description were M326K and M360M. Recently, Jennifer Smith in Math Education has been offering SCI 360 (Topic: Math Domain), a course which uses the textbook intended for capstone courses for prospective math teachers. This course thus also fits the intent of the requirement. Since I have routinely been signing petitions for students to apply this course to this requirement, it seems sensible to add it to the catalogue. However, students seeking middle grades certification should take M326K, since this is the only course explicitly including topics relevant to middle grades math teaching. I believe this is being enforced by UTeach as a prerequisite to recommendation for middle grades certification, but it seems wise to include the caution in the catalogue to alert students seeking middle grades certification of the requirement.


On pages 446-449, under the heading DEGREES, in the College of Natural Sciences chapter of The Undergraduate Catalog, 2004-2006, make the following changes:


BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MATHEMATICS

As an alternative to the Bachelor of Arts degree, the Bachelor of Science in Mathematics is designed with a twofold purpose: to offer students a more extensive scientific program that may better prepare them for graduate study or employment, and to recognize students who choose to pursue a more demanding program. Students are given the opportunity to develop greater breadth and depth in their mathematical programs as well as to combine mathematics with a concentration in another scientific discipline.

To accomplish these goals, the minimum number of semester hours is increased and the maximum limit is removed. Specialization in one additional scientific area is encouraged, and the foreign language requirement is shortened by one semester.

Students seeking the Bachelor of Science in Mathematics must select one of six options: actuarial science, applied mathematics, mathematical sciences, pure mathematics, mathematics for secondary teaching, and mathematics honors. Students who choose the option in mathematical sciences must also select a specialization in either scientific computation or statistics, probability, and data analysis. Admission to option VI, mathematics honors, requires completion of the application process described on page 418.

None of the following courses may be counted toward the degree: Mathematics 301, 302, 303D, 305G.

PRESCRIBED WORK COMMON TO ALL OPTIONS

1. Rhetoric and [Composition] Writing 306 and English 316K. In addition, in taking courses to fulfill other degree requirements, the student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component; one of these courses must be upper-division. If the writing requirement is not fulfilled by courses specified for the degree, the student must fulfill it either with electives or with coursework taken in addition to the number of hours required for the degree. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.


4581


2. Options I-V: Courses 506 and 507 (or the equivalent) in a single foreign language, and a three-semester-hour course in the same language for which 507 is a prerequisite; or as much of this coursework as required by the student’s score on the appropriate language placement test. Students in option VI are exempt from this requirement.
For students in all options who enter the University with fewer than two high school units in a single foreign language, the first two semesters in a language may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree.

3. Six semester hours of American history.

4. Six semester hours of American government, including Texas government.

5. Three semester hours in anthropology, economics, geography, linguistics, psychology, or sociology.

[6. Options I-V: Eight semester hours in one of the following areas: astronomy, biology, chemistry, geological sciences, and physics.
Option VI: Fifteen semester hours in the following fields of study, including coursework in at least three fields: biology, chemistry, computer sciences, and physics.
]

[7. Options I-V: Six semester hours in architecture, classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts (including art history, design, ensemble, fine arts, instruments, music, studio art, theatre and dance, visual art studies), philosophy, or programs of special concentration.
For students in option V, teaching, three of these hours must consist of History 329U or Philosophy 329U. For students in options I through IV, three of these hours must be taken in architecture, classics, fine arts, or philosophy (excluding courses in logic).
Option VI: Three semester hours in one of the fields listed above.
]
[8. Options I-V: Mathematics 408C and 408D, or Mathematics 408K, 408L, and 408M.
Option VI: An honors-designated mathematics course that is restricted to those who have earned credit on the College Board Advanced Placement (AP) Examination in Calculus.
]

[9.] 6. Forty-two semester hours of upper-division coursework.

[10. Options I-V: At least six hours of upper-division coursework must be outside both mathematics and the subject areas listed in requirement 6. Philosophy courses in logic, computer sciences courses in discrete mathematics, and engineering courses may not be used to fulfill this requirement.
Option VI: Students in option VI are exempt from this requirement.
]

[11.] 7. Eighteen semester hours in mathematics must be completed in residence at the University.

[12. Options I-V: Enough additional coursework to make a total of 126 semester hours.
Option VI: A total of at least 120 semester hours.
]


ADDITIONAL PRESCRIBED WORK FOR EACH OPTION

At least eighteen semester hours of upper-division coursework, including at least twelve semester hours of upper-division coursework in physics, must be completed in residence at the University.

OPTION I: ACTUARIAL SCIENCE

This option is designed to give the student a strong foundation for graduate study or work in physics and for further study or work in a variety of other areas.

8. Eight semester hours in one of the following areas: astronomy, biology, chemistry, geological sciences, and physics.

9. Six semester hours in architecture, classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts (including art history, design, ensemble, fine arts, instruments, music, studio art, theatre and dance, visual art studies), philosophy, or programs of special concentration. Three of the hours must be taken in architecture, classics, fine arts, or philosophy (excluding courses in logic).

10. Mathematics 408C and 408D, or 408K, 408L, and 408M.

[13.] 11. Actuarial Foundations 329.

[14.] 12. Economics 304K[,] and 304L[, and 420K].

[15.] 13. Accounting 310F or both 311 and 312.

[16.] 14. Finance 357.

15. Economics 420K or Finance 377 (Topic 2: Financial Risk Management).


4582


[17.] 16. At least thirty-two semester hours of upper-division coursework in mathematics and supporting areas, consisting of
a. One of the following courses: Mathematics 328K, 343K, 361, 361K, 365C, 367K, 373K.
b. Mathematics 340L or 341.
c. Mathematics 362K and either 358K or 378K.
d. At least three courses chosen from the following: Mathematics 339J, 339U, 339V, 449P, [349T,] 349R.
e. Enough additional coursework to provide a total of at least thirty-two hours. In addition to upper-division mathematics courses, the following courses in supporting areas may be counted toward this requirement: Economics 420K, Finance 354, 367, 377 (Topic 2: Financial Risk Management), Legal Environment of Business 320F, 323, Management Information Systems 325, Risk Management 357E, 369K, 377. Courses used to satisfy this requirement may not be counted toward requirement [10 above] 17.


17. At least six semester hours of upper-division coursework must be outside both mathematics and the subject areas listed in requirement 8. Philosophy courses in logic, computer sciences courses in discrete mathematics, [and] engineering courses, and courses counted toward requirement 16e may not be used to fulfill this requirement.

10. Enough additional coursework to make a total of 126 semester hours.


RATIONALE: M 349R is replacing 349T in the program’s offering. The actuarial organizations have reduced the requirement from three semesters of economics to two semesters of economics. Many actuaries still recommend additional economics as useful, and many also recommend more knowledge of investments (especially options). The Finance Department has agreed to let actuarial students take its options class FIN 377.2 (Financial Risk Management).


OPTION II: APPLIED MATHEMATICS

8. Eight semester hours in one of the following areas: astronomy, biology, chemistry, geological sciences, and physics.

9. Six semester hours in architecture, classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts (including art history, design, ensemble, fine arts, instruments, music, studio art, theatre and dance, visual art studies), philosophy, or programs of special concentration. Three of the hours must be taken in architecture, classics, fine arts, or philosophy (excluding courses in logic).

10. Mathematics 408C and 408D, or 408K, 408L, and 408M.

[13.] 11. Computer Sciences 303E or the equivalent.

[14.] 12. Thirty-two semester hours of upper-division coursework in mathematics, consisting of the following courses. The student should consult the applied mathematics adviser for information on other courses that may be counted toward this requirement.
a. Mathematics 340L or 341.
b. Mathematics 427K, 348, 362K, and 474M.
c. Mathematics 361 and 365C.
d. Mathematics 343K or 373K.
e. Enough of the following coursework to provide a total of at least thirty-two hours: Mathematics 346, 365D, 368K, 372K, 376C.


13. At least six semester hours of upper-division coursework must be outside both mathematics and the subject areas listed in requirement 8. Philosophy courses in logic, computer sciences courses in discrete mathematics, and engineering courses may not be used to fulfill this requirement.

14. Enough additional coursework to make a total of 126 semester hours.


OPTION III: MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES

Specialization in Statistics, Probability, and Data Analysis

8. Eight semester hours in one of the following areas: astronomy, biology, chemistry, geological sciences, and physics.


4583


9. Six semester hours in architecture, classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts (including art history, design, ensemble, fine arts, instruments, music, studio art, theatre and dance, visual art studies), philosophy, or programs of special concentration. Three of the hours must be taken in architecture, classics, fine arts, or philosophy (excluding courses in logic).

10. Mathematics 408C and 408D, or 408K, 408L, and 408M.

[13.] 11. Computer Sciences 303E or the equivalent.

[14.] 12. At least thirty-two semester hours of upper-division coursework in mathematics and related areas, consisting of
a. Mathematics 325K or Computer Sciences 336.
[a.] b. Mathematics 427K and 362K.
[b.] c. Mathematics 340L or 341.
[c.] d. Mathematics 361K or 365C.
[d.] e. Mathematics 358K and 378K.
f. Mathematics 328K, 343K, 346, or 373K.
[e.] g.

Additional coursework chosen from the following: Civil Engineering 352, Computer Sciences 327E or 347, Economics 341K, 350K (Topic 4: Advanced Econometrics), 350K (Topic 6: Advanced Microeconomic Theory), 350K (Topic 7: Applied Economic Analysis), 354K, Electrical Engineering 366L, 379K (Topic 2: Quality and Reliability Engineering), 379K (Topic 15: Information Theory), Geography 360G, 360L, [Mathematics 325K or Computer Sciences 336,] Mathematics 339J, 339U, 339V, 343L, 343M, 346, 348, 449P, 349R, 365D, 368K, 373L, 374G, 474M, Mechanical Engineering 366L, 366Q, 366R, 367S, Psychology 325K, Risk Management 357E. Courses used to satisfy this requirement may not be counted toward requirement [10 above] 17.
Most of these courses have substantial prerequisites, sometimes including courses in other departments. Some have restricted enrollment. The student is responsible for meeting prerequisites and other requirements for enrollment in the courses selected to fulfill this requirement. Courses should be chosen in consultation with the specialization adviser to form a coherent program consistent with the student’s background and goals.
Educational Psychology 371 may not be counted toward this degree if it is taken after Mathematics 358K or 378K.



13. At least six semester hours of upper-division coursework must be outside both mathematics and the subject areas listed in requirement 8. Philosophy courses in logic, computer sciences courses in discrete mathematics, engineering courses, and courses counted toward requirement 12g may not be used to fulfill this requirement.

14. Enough additional coursework to make a total of 126 semester hours.


RATIONALE: a. Most students fulfill this requirement anyhow as part of the prerequisite to the Requirement 14(d) (analysis) courses. These courses help prepare students for therequired M362K as well as analysis courses.
f. This will correct several problems. First, the degree plan has had no algebra requirement beyond linear algebra. An additional algebra course is desirable not only as preparation for further work in statistics but also as part of a well-rounded math major. This is especially important to make sure that students who decide to take this degree plan as a second major have a strong math background. Second, this change will make it easier for students to change to this degree plan from others that have an algebra requirement. Third, the coding theory courses M 343L and M 343M, which are appropriate for this degree plan, have one of these courses as a prerequisite; this requirement will allow students to count the prerequisite as part of their degree.
g. Mathematics 325K or Computer Sciences 336: This has been moved to Requirement 14(a). Mathematics 343L, 343M, 349R: These are new courses which are appropriate options for this degree plan. Mathematics 373L: Adding this choice is consistent with the inclusion of M365D and the addition of Requirement 14(f).
h. Despite its high course number, EDP 371 is a very low level statistics course, lower level than our M316, let alone M358K or M378K. Thus a student in the probability/statistics specialization should not be allowed to count the lower level course taken after the higher level courses.

4584


Specialization in Scientific Computation

Students who complete this specialization may simultaneously fulfill the requirements of the Elements of Computing Program and may apply to the director of that program for a certificate of completion. The Elements of Computing Program is described on page 415.

8. Eight semester hours in one of the following areas: astronomy, biology, chemistry, geological sciences, and physics.

9. Six semester hours in architecture, classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts (including art history, design, ensemble, fine arts, instruments, music, studio art, theatre and dance, visual art studies), philosophy, or programs of special concentration. Three of the hours must be taken in architecture, classics, fine arts, or philosophy (excluding courses in logic).

10. Mathematics 408C and 408D, or 408K, 408L, and 408M.

[13.] 11. Computer Sciences 303E and 313E, or 307 and 315.

[14.] 12. At least thirty-two semester hours of upper-division coursework in mathematics and related areas, consisting of
a. Mathematics 340L or 341.
b. Mathematics 427K, 348, 362K, and 368K.
c. Mathematics 361K or 365C.
d. Students who fulfill the requirements of the Elements of Computing Program may count up to six hours of upper-division coursework in that program toward this requirement. Computer Sciences 323E may not be counted toward this requirement. Courses used to satisfy this requirement may not be counted toward requirement [10 above] 13.
e. Additional coursework chosen from the following: Mathematics 325K or 328K (but not both), 427L, 343K or 373K (but not both), 343L, 346, 358K, 361, 365D, 372K, 474M, 376C, 378K.


13. At least six semester hours of upper-division coursework must be outside both mathematics and the subject areas listed in requirement 8. Philosophy courses in logic, computer sciences courses in discrete mathematics, engineering courses, and courses counted toward requirement 12e may not be used to fulfill this requirement.

14. Enough additional coursework to make a total of 126 semester hours.


OPTION IV: PURE MATHEMATICS

8. Eight semester hours in one of the following areas: astronomy, biology, chemistry, geological sciences, and physics.

9. Six semester hours in architecture, classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts (including art history, design, ensemble, fine arts, instruments, music, studio art, theatre and dance, visual art studies), philosophy, or programs of special concentration. Three of the hours must be taken in architecture, classics, fine arts, or philosophy (excluding courses in logic).

10. Mathematics 408C and 408D, or 408K, 408L, and 408M.

[13.] 11. At least thirty-two semester hours of upper-division coursework in mathematics, consisting of
a. Mathematics 340L or 341.
b. Mathematics 427K, 361, 362K, 365C, and 373K.
c. One of the following two-course sequences: Mathematics 427K and 372K, 358K and 378K, [362K and 339U,] 362K and 339J, 348 and 368K, 365C and 365D, 367K and 365G, 367K and 367L, 373K and 373L.
d. Additional hours of upper-division coursework in mathematics chosen with the approval of the mathematics adviser. Either Mathematics 343K or 361K may be counted toward this requirement, but not both.

12. At least six semester hours of upper-division coursework must be outside both mathematics and the subject areas listed in requirement 8. Philosophy courses in logic, computer sciences courses in discrete mathematics, and engineering courses may not be used to fulfill this requirement.
13. Enough additional coursework to make a total of 126 semester hours.


RATIONALE: Omit M 362K and 339U because 362 and 339J is also on the list and (as mentioned

4585


above) 339J is now a prerequisite for 339U. M 367K and 365G added to give more choices to students.

OPTION V: TEACHING

This option is designed to fulfill the course requirements for certification as a middle grades or secondary school mathematics teacher in Texas; however, completion of the course requirements does not guarantee the student’s certification. For information about additional certification requirements, consult the UTeach-Natural Sciences academic adviser.

Students are encouraged to become familiar with a variety of mathematical software relevant to middle grades or secondary teaching, such as computer geometry systems, spreadsheets, and statistical software. Whenever possible, the student should take courses and sections of courses that use these types of software in place of those that do not.

8. Eight semester hours in one of the following areas: astronomy, biology, chemistry, geological sciences, and physics.

9. Six semester hours in architecture, classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts (including art history, design, ensemble, fine arts, instruments, music, studio art, theatre and dance, visual art studies), philosophy, or programs of special concentration. Three of these hours must consist of History 329U or Philosophy 329U.

10. Mathematics 408C and 408D, or 408K, 408L, and 408M.

11. At least six semester hours of upper-division coursework must be outside both mathematics and the subject areas listed in requirement 8. Philosophy courses in logic, computer sciences courses in discrete mathematics, and engineering courses may not be used to fulfill this requirement.

[13.] 12. Mathematics 315C.

[14.] 13. Biology 337 (Topic: Research Methods--UTeach), Chemistry 368 (Topic: Research Methods--UTeach), or Physics 341 (Topic: Research Methods--UTeach). The course used to fulfill this requirement may also be counted toward requirement [6] 8 above if it is in the same field of study as the other courses counted toward requirement [6] 8 . Students are encouraged to take at least one course to fulfill requirement [6] 8   before taking research methods.

[15.] 14. At least thirty-two semester hours of upper-division coursework in mathematics, consisting of
a. Mathematics 340L or 341.
b. Mathematics 325K, 333L, 358K, and 362K.
c. Mathematics 326K or 360M or Science 360 (Topic: Math Domain). Students seeking middle grades mathematics certification must complete Mathematics 326K.
d. Mathematics 361K or 365C.
e. Mathematics 328K, 343K, or 373K.
f. Mathematics 427K or 378K.
g. Enough of the following coursework to provide a total of at least thirty-two semester hours: Mathematics 326K, 427K, 328K, 339J, 339U, 343K, 343L, 348, 360M, 361, 365C, 365D, 368K, 373K, 373L, [175] 175T (Topic: Seminar for Prospective Teachers), 378K. A course used to fulfill requirements [15a through 15f] 14a through 14f may not also be counted toward requirement [15g] 14g.

[16.] 15. A three-semester-hour supporting course that uses mathematics but is in a field other than mathematics. The following courses may be used to fulfill this requirement: Accounting 310F or 311, Architectural Engineering 323K, Astronomy 307, 352K, 352L, 358, 367M, Chemistry 301, 303, Civil Engineering 321, 341, 352, Computer Sciences 307, Economics 420K, Electrical Engineering 302, 366, 366L, Geological Sciences 346C, 354, 476K, Geography 360L, Government 341M, Human Development and Family Sciences 322, Mechanical Engineering 320, 326, 366L, 366Q, 366R, Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 310, Physics 301, 303K, 303L, Psychology 325K, 332, 334C, 345, Sociology 369L. The supporting course may not also be counted toward [requirements 2 through 7 of] other requirements in the prescribed work.

[17.] 16. Eighteen semester hours of professional development coursework: Curriculum and Instruction 650S, UTeach-Natural Sciences 101, 110, 350, 355, 360, 170.


4586


[18.] 17. Students seeking middle grades certification must complete the following courses: Educational Psychology 363M (Topic 3: Adolescent Development), or Psychology 301 and 304; [and] Curriculum and Instruction 371 (Topic 10: Secondary School Reading in the Content Subjects), and Mathematics 326K.

18. Enough additional coursework to make a total of 126 semester hours.


RATIONALE: These courses fit the intent of this requirement and have been approved by petition to satisfy the requirement.


OPTION VI: MATHEMATICS HONORS

8. Breadth requirement: An honors mathematics course; and fifteen semester hours chosen from the following courses, including coursework in three fields of study: Biology 315H, 325H, Chemistry 301H, 302H, Computer Sciences 315H, Physics 301, 315, 316.

9. Three semester hours of architecture, classics, (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts (including art history, design, ensemble, fine arts, instruments, music, studio art, theatre and dance, visual art studies), philosophy (excluding courses in logic), or programs of special concentration.

[13.] 10. An honors section of Mathematics 427K, and six semester hours of coursework chosen from Mathematics 365C, 367K, and 373K.

[14.] 11. Twenty additional semester hours of upper-division coursework in mathematics approved by the departmental faculty adviser.

[15.] 12. Natural Sciences 301C (Research Methods).

[16.] 13. [An honors] A section of Rhetoric and [Composition] Writing 309S that is restricted to Dean’s Scholars.

[17.] 14. Mathematics 379H and a three-semester-hour upper-division research course approved by the departmental honors adviser.

[18.] 15. Thirty additional semester hours of coursework approved by the departmental honors adviser.

[18.] 16. Six semester hours of coursework in the College of Liberal Arts or the College of Fine Arts.

17. Enough additional coursework to make a total of 120 semester hours.


SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS

The student must fulfill the University-wide graduation requirements given on pages 18-19 and the college requirements given on page 421. He or she must also make a grade of at least C [in the courses counted toward requirement 8 of the common prescribed work and] in each course completed at the University and counted toward the prescribed work requirements for his or her option.

To graduate and be recommended for certification, students who follow the teaching option must have a University grade point average of at least 2.50. They must earn a grade of at least C in each of the professional development courses listed in requirement [17] 16 and must pass the final teaching portfolio review; those seeking middle grades certification must also earn a grade of at least C in each of the courses listed in requirement [18] 17. For information about the portfolio review and additional teacher certification requirements, consult the UTeach-Natural Sciences academic adviser.



To graduate under option VI, students must earn grades of A in the departmental research and thesis courses described in requirement [17] 14 above and must present their research in an approved public forum, such as the annual College of Natural Sciences Poster Session. Students must also have a grade point average at graduation of at least 3.50 in coursework taken in residence at the University. Students who fail to maintain an in-residence grade point average of at least 3.25 will usually be academically dismissed from option VI; under special circumstances and at the discretion of the departmental honors adviser, a student may be allowed to continue under academic review.


RATIONALE:Degree plan was re-ordered to include and define the breadth requirement which is an integral part of the Honor’s Option.