Appendix C

Flag Guidance
Undergraduate Studies Dean Paul Woodruff


Faculty Council Legislation (from D 5155-5163 of the General Faculty)
with UGSAC Interpretations


April 10, 2008

Guidance for all Flags

Courses of three or more credit hours that meet the following criteria will be flagged. Note that flagged courses need not be devoted entirely to the respective skills and experiences. Some courses will receive more than one flag. All appropriate courses should be flagged, including those restricted to majors and those following prerequisites that are also flagged.

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Writing


Faculty Council Legislation:

Courses that carry the writing flag must:

  • Require students to write regularly--several times during the semester--and to complete writing projects that are substantial. It is only through the practice of writing that students learn to improve their writing.
  • Be structured around the principle that good writing requires rewriting. Students must receive meaningful feedback from the instructor (or teaching assistant) so they can improve successive drafts.
  • Include writing assignments that constitute at least one-third of the final grade in the course. These assignments must be graded on writing quality as well as content.
  • Provide an opportunity for students to read each other's work in order to offer constructive criticism. Careful reading and analysis of the writing of others is a valuable part of the learning process.

UGSAC Interpretations:
[To be determined by the Writing Subcommittee of UGSAC. Each college or school that teaches undergraduates will be represented on the committee.]
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Quantitative Reasoning

Faculty Council Legislation:

To satisfy the quantitative reasoning flag, at least half of the course grade must be based on the use of quantitative skills (e.g., data analysis and modeling, simulation, statistics, probability, and quantitative decision analysis) to analyze real-world problems.


UGSAC Interpretations:
The aim of the course is to help students become informed citizens who are able to use quantitative information in making practical decisions. Therefore every course should have real-life applications. Not every math, science, or statistics course may be counted.

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Global Cultures

Faculty Council Legislation:

To satisfy the Global Cultures flag, at least one-third of the course grade must be based on content dealing with the cultures and perspectives of a non-U.S. community, country, or coherent regional grouping of countries, past or present.

UGSAC Interpretations:

This is quite broad as defined by the Faculty Council. Representatives of the Educational Policy Committee tell us the breadth was intentional. As in the case of Cultural Diversity, the course should go beyond art appreciation to reach an understanding of a culture.

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Cultural Diversity in the United States

Faculty Council Legislation:

To satisfy the Cultural Diversity in the United States flag, at least one-third of the course grade must be based on content dealing with the culture, perspectives, and history of one or more underrepresented cultural groups in the United States.

UGSAC Interpretations:
“Underrepresented cultural groups” include women. The course should go beyond art appreciation. Social issues are relevant, especially those dealing with the effects of differences in power.

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Ethics and Leadership

Faculty Council Legislation:

To satisfy the Ethics and Leadership flag, at least one-third of the courses grade must be based on work in practical ethics, i.e., the study of what is involved in making real-life ethical choices.

UGSAC Interpretations:

Courses in professionalism may be counted. The flagging form in every case must show specifically how the content of the course meets the requirement.

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Independent Inquiry

Faculty Council Legislation:

To satisfy the Independent Inquiry flag, at least one-third of the course grade must be based on the students’ independent investigation and presentation of their own work. The presentation of their work can take place in many venues including presentations in a capstone course, a performance, independent research or a thesis.

UGSAC Interpretations:

Studio courses may be counted, but not those at an introductory level. When possible, the course should serve as a capstone or fall near to the capstone level in a major.

Return to the minutes of April 14, 2008.