View in portable document format.

7004


DOCUMENTS OF THE GENERAL FACULTY

PROPOSED CHANGES TO THE ELEMENTS OF COMPUTING PROGRAM CERTIFICATE AND REQUEST FOR RECOGNITION ON THE UNIVERSITY TRANSCRIPT

Dean Mary Ann Rankin of the College of Natural Sciences has filed with the secretary of the Faculty Council the proposed changes to the elements of computing program certificate and the request to recognize it on the University transcript. The change will appear in the in the College of Natural Sciences chapter in the Undergraduate Catalog, 2010-2012. The dean of the college approved the request on March 25, 2009. The secretary has classified this proposal as legislation of general interest to the University.

The Committee on Undergraduate Degree Program Review approved the proposal at its meeting on April 14, 2009, and forwarded the proposed changes to the Office of the General Faculty. The Faculty Council has the authority to approve this legislation on behalf of the General Faculty. The authority to grant final approval on this legislation resides with the executive vice chancellor for academic affairs with notification to the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board1.

If no objection is filed with the Office of the General Faculty by the date specified below, the legislation will be held to have been approved by the Faculty Council. If an objection is filed within the prescribed period, the legislation will be presented to the Faculty Council at its next meeting. The objection, with reasons, must be signed by a member of the Faculty Council.

To be counted, a protest must be received in the Office of the General Faculty by noon on May 1, 2009.


Greninger Signature
Sue Alexander Greninger, Secretary
The Faculty Council


This legislation was posted on the Faculty Council web site on April 21, 2009.

1 Amended on April 22, 2009.

7005


PROPOSED ADDITION OF THE SCIENTIFIC COMPUTATION CERTIFICATE AND REQUEST FOR RECOGNITION ON THE UNIVERSITY TRANSCRIPT

OFFICIAL CERTIFICATE NAME: Undergraduate Certificate: Elements of Computing

ADMINISTRATIVE UNIT AWARDING THE CERTIFICATE: Department of Computer Sciences

STATEMENT OF OBJECTIVE: (Include pages in Undergraduate Catalog where changes will be made):

To recognize successful completion of the Elements of Computing certificate program on University transcripts.

This change affects page 488 of the Undergraduate Catalog.

NEED (EXPECTED DEMAND): Since 2000, about 375 informal Elements of Computing certificates (for completing 12 hours of courses) have been awarded. In fall 08, 423 students enrolled in elements classes.

COMPLETION REQUIREMENTS: 18 hours.

ACADEMIC COURSE AND OTHER REQUIREMENTS:
Background
The Department of Computer Science created the Elements of Computing program in 2000 to meet the needs of University students majoring in other disciplines. The program consists of a set of courses intended to help students understand and apply a variety of computing techniques and technologies, especially ones that employers find valuable. Since 2000, the department has awarded informal certificates to students who complete 12 hours of elements courses.
The elements program has been successful and popular. In the fall’08 semester alone, for example, 423 students enrolled in elements classes. Since 2000, about 375 informal elements certificates (for completing 12 hours of courses) have been awarded. Students earning the certificates have majored in a wide variety of disciplines across the University. The most common majors (comprising about half of the total) are, in descending order: mathematics, economics, biology, biochemistry, RTF, history, and engineering.
Proposed Requirements
To earn a certificate that is recognized on the University transcript, students must complete 18 semester hours of elements courses, including CS 303E or its equivalent and at least 9 hours of upper-division courses. All classes submitted for the certificate must be completed with a grade of C- or better:
  • One (1) core course:
    • CS 303E Elements of Computers and Programming or equivalent
  • Five of the following elective courses, three of which must be upper-division:
    • CS 301K Foundations of Logical Thought
    • CS 302 Computer Fluency
    • CS 313E Elements of Software Design
    • CS 320N Topics in Computer Science (approved topics only)
    • CS 324E Elements of Graphics and Digital Media
    • CS 326E Elements of Cyberspace
    • CS 327E Elements of Databases
    • CS 329E Topics in Elements of Computing
With the approval of the certificate program faculty committee, other appropriate courses may be counted toward the elective requirement.


7006


CERTIFICATE PROGRAM ACADEMIC COMMITTEE (Designate committee chair):
Name of Faculty Member College Highest Degree and Awarding Institution Courses Assigned % Time Assigned to Program
Bruce Porter (chair)* CNS Ph.D. – U.C. Irvine NA NA
Alan Cline* CNS Ph.D. – U. of Michigan NA NA
Steve Keckler* CNS Ph.D. –M.I.T. NA NA
J.S. Moore* CSE Ph.D. – U. of Edinburgh NA NA
Mike Scott CSE M.S. – Rennselaer Polytechnic Institute NA NA
David Zuckerman CSE Ph.D. – U.C. Berkeley NA NA


GIVE A DETAILED RATIONALE FOR CHANGE(S):
The Elements of Computing program was created to serve students outside of the computer science major. It has proven to be very popular with students. However, we have anecdotal evidence that the students would benefit from receiving official recognition for completing the program.

COLLEGE/SCHOOL APPROVAL PROCESS:
Mary Ann Rankin, dean
College of Natural Sciences
Date: March 25, 2009



THE ELEMENTS OF COMPUTING PROGRAM

The Elements of Computing Program is designed to support computational work in other disciplines and to provide students with skills in the use of computer applications. Any non–computer sciences major may take any elements of computing course for which he or she meets the prerequisite. No application process is required.
[Non–computer sciences majors who wish to build a concentration in computing may request certification in the elements of computing. Students who complete the following certification requirements and submit a request to the Computer Sciences Undergraduate Advising Office receive a certificate of completion and a letter listing the courses taken. Additional information about the Elements of Computing Program is given at http://www.cs.utexas.edu/academics/non_majors/elements/.]
[The certification requirements are]
[1. Computer Sciences 303E or 305J, with a grade of at least C.
2. Computer Sciences 307 or 313E, with a grade of at least C.
3. Two of the following courses, with a grade of at least C in each: Computer Sciences 323E, 324E, 326E, 327E, 329E. The student must complete these two courses in residence.]


To earn a certificate that is recognized on the University transcript, students must complete 18 semester hours of elements courses, including CS 303E or its equivalent and at least 9 hours of upper-division courses. All classes submitted for the certificate must be completed with a grade of C- or better:
  • One (1) core course:
    • CS 303E Elements of Computers and Programming or equivalent
  • Five of the following elective courses, three of which must be upper-division:
    • CS 301K Foundations of Logical Thought
    • CS 302 Computer Fluency
    • CS 313E Elements of Software Design
    • CS 320N Topics in Computer Science (approved topics only)
    • CS 324E Elements of Graphics and Digital Media

7007


    • CS 326E Elements of Cyberspace
    • CS 327E Elements of Databases
    • CS 329E Topics in Elements of Computing
With the approval of the certificate program faculty committee, other appropriate courses may be counted toward the elective requirement.

Undergraduates who complete the certificate requirements in conjunction with, or within one year after completing the requirements of their degree program, will receive a certificate and recognition on their transcript. A maximum of nine credit hours in the certificate program may be taken after completion of the undergraduate degree. At least half of the required course work in the certificate program must be completed in residence at The University of Texas at Austin.